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View Full Version : Ideal weight for the "Big Three." Help.



B-Rabbit
11-23-2011, 23:12
Just wondering if anyone had any suggestions on the ideal weight of the big three (Tent, Pack, Sleeping Bag)? Looks like I will be at 9.5 lbs with tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, footprint and pack. Is that too heavy? I'd like to stay under 30 lbs with a loaded pack. Any help would be appreciated!!

Northern Lights
11-23-2011, 23:23
My four are 10.8 pounds. Tent, pack, bag and exped mat

atmilkman
11-23-2011, 23:29
Your right in the average ballpark figure. I'm at 11lbs. with winter bag and 9 with summer bag, but I carry a two-man tent because of my size. I carry the footprint also for when I want to set up without the inner tent, fly and footprint only.

B-Rabbit
11-23-2011, 23:39
Good to hear!!

Lando11
11-24-2011, 02:18
Just wondering if anyone had any suggestions on the ideal weight of the big three (Tent, Pack, Sleeping Bag)? Looks like I will be at 9.5 lbs with tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, footprint and pack. Is that too heavy? I'd like to stay under 30 lbs with a loaded pack. Any help would be appreciated!!

if you are trying to stay under 30 lbs with 4-5 days of food, you will struggle with almost 10 lbs of pack/pad/bag.
get that # closer to 6 lbs for the 'big 3' and you will be well off. my 3 season base this year on my AT thru was about 10 lbs, which wasnt crazy light. the heaviest my pack was when i made most of my upgrades in southern VA was 27 lbs fully loaded entering the 100 mile wilderness out of Monson,, Me. and that was with a hammock as well that added over a pound with my six moon design tent setup.

But, if you are starting with about 3lbs per item, you are doing pretty good. if you would like to really drop your base weight though, be ready to make some adjustments to your gear.

daddytwosticks
11-24-2011, 12:45
Not to be sarcastic, the weight of my big three varies on what I'm carrying at the time. Depends on time of year, lenght of trip, expected weather, etc. :)

B-Rabbit
11-24-2011, 13:01
Well, I guess if I got rid of my footprint (7.0z) and sleeping pad (27 oz). That would take 34 oz off my back and get me in the 7lb range... That pad sure would be nice tho!!

@Lando11- How much of that 27 lbs was food/water on average?

Stir Fry
11-24-2011, 13:06
Back Pack

ULA Catalyst

2lb 12oz
Total 2lb 12oz 44oz



Shelter

Warbonnet Black bird.
Home made Cubin fiber tarp, with 6 Titanium
stakes 10.5X8.5
Home made UQ, 70”X48” ( 800 fill down)
Cubin Momentum 55, 3” loft, good to 15*-20*

24oz

10oz

17oz

Total 3lb 03oz 51oz



Sleeping

Home made Quilt, Cubin Momentum 50, 3” loft
good to 15*-20*

19oz

Total 1lb03oz 19oz

















This is my big three, and you could go lighter without to much trouble. Total is 114oz or 7lb 2oz

JAK
11-24-2011, 13:31
My big 3 are...
1. Sleeping Bags: 40oz, 62oz, or 102oz.
0F rated synthetic bag at 3 pounds 14 ounces.
20F rated cheap down bag at 40oz, of which 20oz is fill and 20oz is polyester shell. Got it for $50 at Mardens.
The 20F is snug on me, and the 0F is loose, so one will nest inside the other very nicely for -30F, MAYBE.
2. Poncho Tarp, Bivy Sack, and Blue Foam Pad: 10oz, 32oz, 10oz for 52oz total if I bring the bivy sack.
3. Pack is a Jam2 at 20oz.

So 40+20+20 in summer = 5.0 pounds, and 62+52+20 in Spring/Fall = 8.4 pounds, and 11 pounds in winter.

mirabela
11-24-2011, 13:31
Don't freak out about it. You're fine. If you go over 30 with 5 days of food, halfway through the second day you're back under anyway. Big deal.

There's a point of diminishing returns, where you can spend a lot more money and/or considerably shrink your margin of comfort and/or safety to save a few pounds. It can become something to obsess over when not out hiking. Not worth it, IMO.

JAK
11-24-2011, 13:53
I like to go 10 pounds in summer, 20 pounds Spring/Fall, 30 pounds in winter, total skin out including food, but I'm willing to go up to 10 pounds over those numbers for a longer trip with extra food or for some other reason, like testing out some funky gear or making and testing some clothing or gear or shelter while out there, or if its winter and could get really really cold. Hiking with daughter will add about 10 pounds also, more in winter. Haven't done overnight in winter with her yet. It would be close to home, backyard first, but it would have to be with a tent and super warm, at least until I break her in. Probably need a tobogan for that trip, and she'll probably want. to ride on it much of the time. I guess I'll make it a trudge, and she can fly along on here skis. Maybe this winter. Here's hoping.

B-Rabbit
11-24-2011, 14:12
Looks like im in a decent range. I just don't want the ounces to add up and end up with a 50lb pack and instantly have to regear. Thanks for the reality check "mirabela", It is hard not to obsess over. Planning for a thru attempt somehow makes you think you don't know anything about hiking even when you do it on a regular basis.

skinewmexico
11-24-2011, 14:34
Not too bad. As you move forward, just replace what you have with something lighter. Replace your pad now with a Neoair, or a Exped Synmat UL7. It's an ongoing process.

Tinker
11-25-2011, 17:05
http://www.bozemanmountainworks.com/?do=showproduct&id=83

Here's a light pad. Couple it with a length of closed cell foam which can double as a sit pad.
Any of the pads on the market which have a compressible insulation will lose most of their insulating value and all of their comfort if they go flat.
All can be patched, but even losing one night of sleep on a long hike will make it less than fun. The extra-loft pads are comfy as long as they don't lose air.

Oops! It looks like that one is no longer available. Check this one instead:\
http://www.prolitegear.com/montbell_ul_comfort_system_pad_90.html