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Cassie_Bee
01-15-2012, 22:04
Hi everyone,

I love books and I don't go anywhere without them. I have an amazon kindle and I'm contemplating taking it on the trail with me to save on space and money; I could put as many books as I liked on it along with audiobooks if I wished as well.

Has anyone else done/considered this? Is it worth doing if someone is an avid enough reader? On typical hikes I bring dead tree format books and usually plow through them quickly, so I know from experience I still read quite a lot while hiking. I'm mostly concerned about durability and whether I'd be able to keep a consistent charge on the e-reader.

Wise Old Owl
01-15-2012, 22:06
solar power and keep in mind theres an app for that...


14905

OutdoorsMan
01-15-2012, 22:19
I have the same interest as you. I would think that with care (keeping it in a waterproof and impact resistant container) it would last the duration of your hike. I could go without for awhile if the battery drained and wait until the next town I resupplied in to recharge it. My limited research indicates that the fewer features it has the longer the battery life.

SCRUB HIKER
01-15-2012, 22:53
One of my hiking partners on the AT last year brought a Kindle for the entire thru-hike. Anytime someone asked him how he liked it, he would say, "It's the best decision I made for the whole hike." He kept it double-ziplocked and in the water bladder sleeve against his back on his (framed) pack and it lasted the whole way. I got one for Christmas and I'm bringing it on all my future hikes, short and long. I think it's an increasingly common practice.

SCRUB HIKER
01-15-2012, 22:54
I should have said "internal framed."

birdygal
01-15-2012, 23:37
I got a fire for Christmas and gave my husband my old kindle, I am going to take my husbands on my Thru , I love the fire but the old one you can read a whole book before the battery needs recharging, my new fire is good for maybe 3 hours those times are for both with the Wifi in Off position. Though to read at night I will end up having to use my headlamp

jj2044
01-15-2012, 23:52
@birdgal, you should look into http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-Lighted-Leather-Cover-Keyboard/dp/B003DZ165W/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1326685844&sr=1-4 it has a light and the cover will help protect it....

Cassie_Bee
01-16-2012, 00:24
I would also like a cover/light for my kindle! I have a neat leather case for it but it's bulky and probably doesn't do as good a job as some of the others out there.

Cassie_Bee
01-16-2012, 00:24
Actually scratch that, maybe my case will be fine, and I can just use the headlamp I am bringing to read on the kindle.

Northern Lights
01-16-2012, 00:50
I took mine on a three week hike. It usually holds a charge for about a month. So long as you are heading to town once a month you should be good. I enjoyed curling up in my bag every night and reading myself to sleep. I have an older model and just read by headlamp. I did put it in a plastic bag and wrapped it in a handkerchief during the day.

Slo-go'en
01-16-2012, 01:35
lots of people had kindles on the trail last year, including me. The e-ink version will go a long time. The only problem is the pages turn slow when its cold out. The new Fire looks interesting since it has a better web browser, but down side is short battery life. Get a padded case, a big zip lock and try not to sit on it while it's in the pack and your good to go.

darkage
01-16-2012, 01:56
Yup, cept it'll be kindle on my iphone ... all in one. =)

Wil
01-16-2012, 03:39
I was always reluctant because my Kindle 3 is long enough that without stiff protection I feared it was vulnerable to damage from the torque it might be subject to. The newer Kindle (the non-intrusive ad-supported one at $79) is shorter and easier to stow, protected in existing gear. And the cheaper price would make it a little less painful to lose from damage.

quilteresq
01-16-2012, 11:08
I started Kindle reading on my I pod - read some LONG books on that thing before my husband started feeling bad and got me a Kindle for Christmas last year. I love the Kindle, but it's the one with the keyboard - too heavy for my tastes on the trail. On the other hand, I hope to have an Iphone for the trail, with a Kindle reader on it. And extra power source would be nice so I could read in the tent and/or hammock before bed without running out of power between town visits. That may or may not happen.

The Ipod Kindle app is harder on the eyes because of the backlight. Hubby got me a lighted leather Kindle case, which is much easier on the eyes than the Ipod reading, but again, I'm willing to bring the lighter option. I figure I'll be too tired to read for hours, which is sometimes what I do at home.

BigHodag
01-16-2012, 16:28
How about 1 hour of sun equals 3 days reading for just $79?

Just announced at CES 2012:

SolarKindle Lighted Cover
http://www.solarmio.com/en/SolarKindleLightedCover.aspx

(http://www.solarmio.com/en/SolarKindleLightedCover.aspx)

Marta
01-16-2012, 17:01
How about 1 hour of sun equals 3 days reading for just $79?Just announced at CES 2012:SolarKindle Lighted Coverhttp://www.solarmio.com/en/SolarKindleLightedCover.aspx (http://www.solarmio.com/en/SolarKindleLightedCover.aspx)That looks like just the ticket!

Papa D
01-16-2012, 17:52
I don't understand why it has become so commonplace to detract from the trail experience by the continual addition of electronics connecting people to the outer world - the trail is a narrow little strip of wild - bringing in kindles and laptops and unnecessary cell phone use really detracts from backpacking for me - besides - the lucky feeling of picking up a used paperback at a shelter is missing too. HYOH

LDog
01-16-2012, 18:06
I've given a little thought to this. I have an older e-ink model with a whole lot of books that would great to read along the way. Plus a lot of reference books that would be great to have. I have the Kindle app on my droid, I use it frequently, have access to all the same books, and it would be nice to have the bigger screen. The long battery life of the Kindle is a big plus, I wouldn't be sucking more power from the droid, and they can share the same charger. In the end, I'm already looking for ways to reduce pack weight, and I'm just not willing to strap on the extra 8 ozs ...

LDog
01-16-2012, 18:08
I don't understand why it has become so commonplace to detract from the trail experience by the continual addition of electronics connecting people to the outer world

Wow! it took 17 posts for the anti-electronics crowd to weigh in!


HYOH

Indeed ...

Marta
01-16-2012, 18:11
I always enjoy reading anti-electronics rants on the Internet...

I got a kindle for Christmas and have become a convert. Good battery life. You can enlarge the print for reading in dim light. Lighter than most paperback books. I've only taken mine out on one short, four-day hike, but it performed like a champ. I've already downloaded enough books to take me through an AT hike, and many of them were free.

Wil
01-16-2012, 18:23
I think the Kindle is more apt to be a private, non-intrusive experience, so I don't see why the objection.

I don't contemplate 17 people walking in circles on every summit you've just used your last breath to get to, waving their Kindles in the air trying to get a signal so they can yell to every single person they know, none of whom could care less, "You'll never guess where I am!"

Is there any real question that electronics are intrusive in the backcountry? That doesn't mean we shouldn't use them all we want; but in company, keep it in your pants.

Rick Hancock
01-16-2012, 18:31
I've used my Kindle on quite a few weekend trips. I was concerned about weather but I double bag it in gallon freezer weight zip lock bags with the nylon padded sleeve and have had no problems. Lowest temps were appx. mid 20's I did wrap it in my fleece overnight. I've also used it on all of my multi day Mt.Bike rides and it's worked fine.

dink
01-16-2012, 21:49
as an avid consumer of anything written, my kindle goes where I go... the solar charging thing sounds like a winner to me!!

Sal-XK
01-16-2012, 22:20
I put all my electronics in pelican cases. I'm a gadget person so I like taking stuff with me. There not the lightest protection I guess but there indestructible. The one I have for my IPhone is .49LBS but my rucks been dropped thrown and soaked and my IPhone was fine no worries.

rustmd
01-16-2012, 22:43
brought my kindle on a hike/canoe in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska) for 4 weeks 2 summers ago. battery held up entire time, i used it 2 hrs/day. double ziplock w/ a neoprene-type cover. i've brought my kindle w/ me on other long distance hike/canoe trips since then and it's always held up very well. for avid readers it's a dream.

dottie

HT1
01-16-2012, 22:44
After breaking every piece of electronic gear I carried on the little outdoor trip my uncle sent me on in beautiful sunny southern Iraq:-? I will be carrying novels on my thru attempt, so if you like westerns, hike a day behind me:) BTW use any reader you like, I just dont trust them not to break on me... Maybe I have a Gremlin in my pack breaking all my electronics:eek:

imscotty
01-16-2012, 22:47
Would love to be able to carry the Peterson Field Guide Series on a Kindle. I do not think they are available yet.

And the complete set of AT Guide Books. Any hope that these will be published in electronic form?

Papa D
01-16-2012, 23:06
I think the Kindle is more apt to be a private, non-intrusive experience, so I don't see why the objection.

I don't contemplate 17 people walking in circles on every summit you've just used your last breath to get to, waving their Kindles in the air trying to get a signal so they can yell to every single person they know, none of whom could care less, "You'll never guess where I am!"

Is there any real question that electronics are intrusive in the backcountry? That doesn't mean we shouldn't use them all we want; but in company, keep it in your pants.

I more or less agree with this but I have hiked to a few mountaintops to encounter tons of people talking on cell phones - doesn't really thrill me.

Papa D
01-16-2012, 23:13
Wow! it took 17 posts for the anti-electronics crowd to weigh in!



Indeed ...

I don't have a problem with kindles and laptops (as much as I do cell phones) as long as they don't disturb me but a shelter full of people on lap tops and folks talking on their cell phones seems sort of like my office - I want to hear the owls, and the trains in the distance, and so forth. My point was that this obsession to bring the front country to the backcountry takes away from ones own trail experience. Out of full disclosure, I do sometimes listen to my i-pod mini - usually after a few days solo in the winter and I carry a cell phone such that (in an emergency) if I have service, I could perhaps turn it on. I would never consider carrying on a conversation within remote earshot of anyone (barring an emergency).

Theosus
01-17-2012, 23:56
I think the Kindle is more apt to be a private, non-intrusive experience, so I don't see why the objection.Agreed. No more intrusive than a book in my mind... Still I think that I'd rather take a paper book myself, or even a blank notebook and write one. I wouldn't begrudge someone else for using one. I like the solar thing though.

ezNomad
01-19-2012, 03:05
Would love to be able to carry the Peterson Field Guide Series on a Kindle. I do not think they are available yet.

I don't have Peterson on Kindle, but I do have a nature field guide called "Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates: A Guide to North American Species". I plan to purchase soon a few others in the same series (mammals tracking/edible plants).

I'm finding it informative... although on the b/w Kindle Touch some of the small pictures are hard to see.

ezNomad
01-19-2012, 03:08
Would love to be able to carry the Peterson Field Guide Series on a Kindle. I do not think they are available yet.

Not sure about Peterson guides but I have a nature field guide on Kindle called "Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates: A Guide to North American Species". I plan to purchase soon a few others in the same series (mammals tracking/edible plants).

I'm finding it informative... although on the b/w Kindle Touch some of the small pictures are hard to see.

romany
01-19-2012, 07:57
Would love to be able to carry the Peterson Field Guide Series on a Kindle. I do not think they are available yet.

And the complete set of AT Guide Books. Any hope that these will be published in electronic form?


There are several good birding apps for the Kindle....the Mitch Waite Ibird Pro2 or the Audabon series.

Wise Old Owl
01-19-2012, 09:37
[/URL][url]http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=+bird+book&x=0&y=0#/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_20?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=bird+identification+books+for+kindle&sprefix=bird+identification+%2Cdigital-text%2C133&rh=n%3A133140011%2Ck%3Abird+identification+books+f or+kindle (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=peterson+bird+book&x=19&y=17)

Ender
01-19-2012, 10:03
I don't understand why it has become so commonplace to detract from the trail experience by the continual addition of electronics connecting people to the outer world - the trail is a narrow little strip of wild - bringing in kindles and laptops and unnecessary cell phone use really detracts from backpacking for me - besides - the lucky feeling of picking up a used paperback at a shelter is missing too. HYOH

...My point was that this obsession to bring the front country to the backcountry takes away from ones own trail experience...

That's you. For others this just doesn't hold true at all. Like you yourself said, HYOH, and quite worrying about how others are hiking theirs.

Theosus
01-19-2012, 21:37
Would love to be able to carry the Peterson Field Guide Series on a Kindle. I do not think they are available yet.And the complete set of AT Guide Books. Any hope that these will be published in electronic form?It would be a long laborious process, but if you hit the highlights only and left out the unnecessary bits, you could do it. Every kindle account now has an email address assigned. You can email documents to yourself to be displayed in kindle, like PDF and Word Docs. The thing is most email is limited to 10mb. So - get out your scanner. Scan in black and white at a low res, and drop into word.If your scanner will do OCR, and you have adobe acrobat, you can convert the thing to text and using a pdf file saves a LOT of space. email the PDF to Kindle. Done. Like I said though, a LOT of work if you're doing more than 30 pages or so. I coverted our 350 page policy/procedure manual to PDFs for work, 35 separate word docs. Took all day, and that was without scanning and fixing OCR errors.

Papa D
01-19-2012, 21:54
That's you. For others this just doesn't hold true at all. Like you yourself said, HYOH, and quite worrying about how others are hiking theirs.

Ok then, what ARE the limits then? Would you be ok with an ATV following you down the trail to re-supply? How about pack-animals? What about running power to the shelters and having heating and AC? I'm not "worried" personally about electronics as long as they don't bother me or my restful night but my point is that they ARE missing out on some aspects of the common, long standing, shared experience and memories that thru-hikers who have come before them - over-reliance on electronics takes away, plain and simple. Yes, hike your own hike but each person should consider what that means to him or her in the context of an Appalachian Trail thru-hike - if they picked this experience in the first place, there are aspects of nature and self-reliance that must be at least somewhat desirous to them - my point is that these aspects should be celebrated and not darkened by overt use and reliance on electronics.

Slo-go'en
01-19-2012, 22:38
- my point is that these aspects should be celebrated and not darkened by overt use and reliance on electronics.

Hikers have been taking pictures, listening to music and reading books on the trail since forever. The only thing that has changed is now the camara, music and book can all be had in one little device, which also happens to make phone calls. I don't know how this affects one's trail experiance in a negative way - except for the phone part, that can be annoying. But we're talking books here, not phones and books are non-intrusive, no matter how the content is delivered.

Wise Old Owl
01-19-2012, 22:45
Slo-go'en has a point so I use a cricket sound for a ringer.it's hilarious when it goes off in a resturant.... Papa D.... Don't break a sweat - its the Internet... Really is this going to destroy your hike?

Lyle
01-19-2012, 22:46
I'm finding it informative... although on the b/w Kindle Touch some of the small pictures are hard to see.

I just recently found out that any of the graphics can be viewed at full-screen size. Not sure how the Touch works (assume you just double tap it or something), but on the cheap model that I have, I just use the multi-selector to move the cursor to the photo, then hit "ok" and the photo goes to full-screen size. Still gray-scale obviously, but very useful.

Ender
01-20-2012, 09:22
Ok then, what ARE the limits then? Would you be ok with an ATV following you down the trail to re-supply? How about pack-animals? What about running power to the shelters and having heating and AC? I'm not "worried" personally about electronics as long as they don't bother me or my restful night but my point is that they ARE missing out on some aspects of the common, long standing, shared experience and memories that thru-hikers who have come before them - over-reliance on electronics takes away, plain and simple. Yes, hike your own hike but each person should consider what that means to him or her in the context of an Appalachian Trail thru-hike - if they picked this experience in the first place, there are aspects of nature and self-reliance that must be at least somewhat desirous to them - my point is that these aspects should be celebrated and not darkened by overt use and reliance on electronics.

First, an electronic book is not going to lead to the AT being paved over and condos built on the side of it, so stop being so dramatic.

And as far as electronics taking away from the experience, again, that is your opinion. Others would, and have, disagreed with you. Electronics also add to the experience in other ways.

It's just a different experience, not a better or a worse one.

Papa D
01-20-2012, 09:26
Slo-go'en has a point so I use a cricket sound for a ringer.it's hilarious when it goes off in a resturant.... Papa D.... Don't break a sweat - its the Internet... Really is this going to destroy your hike?

ok, whatever. You (and Ender) win - wasn't trying to be dramatic - it's cool BUT I'm still going with my paperback
(and quietly snicker at people carrying laptops if they can't keep up). ;)

joshuasdad
01-20-2012, 10:05
Remember that a Kindle can save you a lot of weight by:

1) Having the ALDHA trail guide in PDF form available
2) There are elevation profile files in PDF form which you can download
3) Maps as well
4) If you get the 3G version, you might be able to use it for emergency communications (provided 3G is available)
5) In town, if wifi is available, you can browse the web, send e-mail, etc.
6) And obviously, no need to carry paperback books

Of course, you can do all of the above with an Android phone or iPhone as well, and those provide a camera (and phone). Which is great, as long as you can carry enough battery power...

Blue Jay
01-20-2012, 20:15
I always enjoy reading anti-electronics rants on the Internet...

I perfer the more constant electronic rants, hysterical. The battery life on paperbacks is slightly better and you can fall or sit on them. You can burn them as you go, so quickly they weigh nothing. Get them wet, who cares. Almost free at libraries and used book stores, but hay you can carry an over priced, fragile, battery powered lap top if you want. You do look cool, as I walk up behind you with your ear plugs in and you jump out of your skin.

Blue Jay
01-20-2012, 20:19
It would be a long laborious process, but if you hit the highlights only and left out the unnecessary bits, you could do it. Every kindle account now has an email address assigned. You can email documents to yourself to be displayed in kindle, like PDF and Word Docs. The thing is most email is limited to 10mb. So - get out your scanner. Scan in black and white at a low res, and drop into word.If your scanner will do OCR, and you have adobe acrobat, you can convert the thing to text and using a pdf file saves a LOT of space. email the PDF to Kindle. Done. Like I said though, a LOT of work if you're doing more than 30 pages or so. I coverted our 350 page policy/procedure manual to PDFs for work, 35 separate word docs. Took all day, and that was without scanning and fixing OCR errors.

Fiber makes me sad.

Papa D
01-20-2012, 20:27
Remember that a Kindle can save you a lot of weight by:

1) Having the ALDHA trail guide in PDF form available
2) There are elevation profile files in PDF form which you can download
3) Maps as well
4) If you get the 3G version, you might be able to use it for emergency communications (provided 3G is available)
5) In town, if wifi is available, you can browse the web, send e-mail, etc.
6) And obviously, no need to carry paperback books

Of course, you can do all of the above with an Android phone or iPhone as well, and those provide a camera (and phone). Which is great, as long as you can carry enough battery power...

bet it's heaver than three pages torn out of the companion (inc. elevations and miles) and my Garmin Forerunner (with an altimeter) and a copy of The Dharma Bums

Marta
01-21-2012, 08:22
...You do look cool, as I walk up behind you with your ear plugs in and you jump out of your skin.That would not have been me you startled--I don't choose to block one of my senses while hiking. No earplugs. No music but the wind.

But a rant is a rant. If the shoe fits...

Grinder
01-21-2012, 10:00
I carried one the last three years. I also have to read at night to go to sleep.
This year, my phone will also be my reader. A few extra batteries will get me through a week. (I hope)

KeyWest
01-23-2012, 14:32
I took my kindle on the trail last year. Best decision I ever made. Email, guidebooks, internet if you really need it. If you're going to carry more than one book on the trail, get a kindle.
The new ones (gray not white) get phenomenal battery life. The older ones aren't slouching either. I took mine and it was one of the best pieces of gear I had. Used it every day. Here's my breakdown: http://www.atlantisroads.com/gear/kindle/

Do make sure you get some sort of waterproof zip bag for it...and be careful where you pack it (i.e.- not against your cooking pot).

KeyWest
01-23-2012, 14:39
By the way, I think paperbacks (1931) detract from the feel of hardbound print press (1440) books. Actually, I really miss the feel and look handwritten papyrus scrolls...but then again, it's really more about the content than the medium. An e-reader is just another step along the progression...one that makes books much more widely available, in town and on the trail.

I'm glad I was born in this age!

prain4u
01-23-2012, 19:18
I am going to agree with Papa D on this one---I too am not a big fan of electronic devices being used when people are hiking/camping. (A bit of self disclosure--I do bring a small radio with me to listen to the weather report and a cell phone for emergencies)

I am not against electronic devices being used on the trail---WHEN THE PERSONS WHO USE THEM ARE RESPECTFUL OF OTHER PEOPLE AND WHEN THEY TAKE STEPS TO MINIMIZE THE "IMPACT" OF THEIR ELECTRONIC DEVICES UPON OTHER PEOPLE.

I don't mind people hiking with an "e-reader" of some kind. However, in a shelter (or if we are sharing a tent), I don't want to be kept awake to an unreasonable hour by someone reading and using a lighted e-reader or using a headlamp to illuminate an e-reader (or to illuminate a traditional book). If you want to stay up all night reading--or typing your blog--please go somewhere away from people who are trying to sleep.

I come to the woods to listen to the sounds of nature--not to listen to you talking on a cellphone. (Did you ever notice how much more loudly people tend to speak when they are talking on a cellphone--as opposed to when they are talking to a person who is sitting next to them?). Please take yourself a respectful distance away from the rest of us when you want to use your phone. Try to speak in a softer voice when using your phone--and please remember how far a sound can travel outdoors under the proper conditions.

I don't usually want to hear the music which is coming from your iPod (either through a speaker or through the noise which happens to escape from your earbuds or headphones). So, please, turn the volume down and unplug the external speaker, (If you are wearing earbuds or headphones--and I can hear your music when I am several feet away from you--your music is probably too loud).

The woods are big enough for all of us. It is my belief, that if your behavior (or my behavior) is going to be potentially disruptive, we have an "obligation" to be courteous to others. We should try to find ways to "Leave No Trace" with our electronic sounds, our lights, our voices and our electronic devices.

Bear Cables
01-26-2012, 23:27
I always bring my kindle. I made a slip cover for it out of bubble wrap to protect it and store it in a ziplock back.

Cassie_Bee
07-14-2012, 12:32
Hi just thought I'd post about my experience with the Kindle being used out here since after making this topic I went ahead and brought it.

It lasted 1000 miles. Now my kindle was a year old and inside a case. I would always be really careful with it when moving my pack; I never dropped my pack to the ground or anything like that, and always made sure the kindle was at the top. The battery always lasted a long time, I never ran out of battery on the kindle before I was near a town to resupply and it always charged up fast enough to not be a big deal.

I read about 35 books while hiking. If I didn't have the kindle, I would have read much less frequently. For instance, I had a copy of Infinite Jest on my Kindle and there would have been no way I was going to bring that in any other form other than electronic on the trail. If the kindle hadn't broken, I was going to put maps on the kindle and use it for that.

It seemed to me that I was extra careful of my Kindle because other people with newer kindles had theirs break sooner. A lot of people I knew had brought kindles, theirs had broken by Damascus. When my Kindle broke, I hadn't dropped it or anything like that. I just took it out one day and the screen was all garbled. From reading online, it seems that Kindles have issues with pressure being put on the screens; if pressure on the screen is too great the e-ink leaks and the screen screws up, and it sounds like a lot of Kindle owners experience these problems without the rigors of hiking. From my surveys of other hikers, it seems that I am definitely one of the only ones to have had a surviving kindle for an extended amount of time.

Now, when I called Amazon to replace my Kindle, since it was out of warranty they will not replace it but will sell me a discounted Kindle. I refused and will probably not have an e-book reader for a very long time, and probably never get a Kindle if I do get one (my kindle was a birthday gift). It just seems like Amazon was normalizing the fact that my Kindle had broken, as it was something to be expected simply from using it. I went very out of my way to keep my Kindle safe and in the end it just up and croaked on me without any visible damage, without impact to the screen or being dropped, and so I would not advise someone to bring a Kindle on a hike unless they were ready to accept it possibly being broken no matter what they do. Again, almost everyone I knew that brought (newer ones than mine, too) kindles had theirs broken months before mine had kicked the bucket, so this is not just my own kindle I am talking about but just e-books on the trail in general.

OzJacko
07-14-2012, 21:23
Thanks for the heads up.
My son and I will be carrying Kindle or similar in 2013. I may look at some sort of "stiffer" packaging for it.
Whilst I prefer paper books and we will carry at least one paper copy data book etc each, we will be travelling with Kindle or similar to have lots more available to read and for reference. We will also be carrying phones (perhaps the same unit but probably not) for texting and journalling.
As most of the people who have an interest in our progress or who need to contact us will be in Australia, we feel this is not negotiable.
We will be hiking with all units switched off except at some highpoints to collect text messages etc and they will mainly be used at night and in towns.
Rest assured I do not like listening to one half of conversations while in a hut and will not subject anybody else to it.

Corporal_Dusty
07-15-2012, 00:37
There's a thru hiker this year named Kindle Ninja. Just ran across him last week when I was on a section hike. We struck up a small conversation as I also carry my kindle touch. I agree with other posters. Hyoh and as long as it doesn't bother/affect others experiences, go for it. There was another thru hiker at a shelter I stayed a night at who had also put his guides and maps on his kindle touch. Seems to be growing in popularity a little bit. Definitely get something so the screen doesn't get shattered and something waterproof for it.

pawee
07-15-2012, 07:43
....(maw here).......paw and i hiked our first thru in 2003....we were out there again this year and noticed an "interesting" technological phenomenon ....hikers are reading more and talking less.....

....i'll admit to occasionally "coveting" a few kindles, smart phones...etc ;-) .....there were actually a few nights where i would have loved to curl up under our quilt with a good book!....but i think i enjoy the "banter" among hikers even more, and frankly, it was sometimes a little sad to look around and realize everyone was on their "device"!....(did make for some nice quiet settling in for the night, though!....heh heh)!.........one of my favorite things about a hike is getting to know the other hikers....i figure i have the rest of the year to read....

....however....i think a kindle MIGHT be worth taking....(i dunno....how much does it WEIGH?).....if a paperback book weighs less, just put a few in a bounce box?......i have heard of troubles with kindles "dying" out there......i would say, DEFINITELY keep it protected as much as possible (especially on the AT or other similarly "wet" trails).........

....read on, peeps!

Corporal_Dusty
07-15-2012, 10:55
Agreed maw. In all actuality, I never did turn mine on to read on my section hike (tho I have a ton of books on it, I was much too excited to concentrate on reading). The touch is fairly light at .7 oz. I put a diary application on mine to write the daily journal entry on. Definitely worth the weight savings over carrying a notebook, but it definitely needs to be kept safe. My fiance had a kindle keyboard and the screen shattered on him with barely anything hitting it.
I had anywhere from 1-4 nobo thru hikers at my camp sites, so we enjoyed ourselves by the campfires enjoying stories, sharing pictures (Frodo this year has had some amazing bear encounter stories and videos!), sharing gorp, and just musing over the lack of flowing streams here in NY before we headed to bed. When we all decided to retire to our tents I'd break out the journal application for a few with the headlamp and write out the days journal entry. And the battery on the e-ink kindles lasts forever!

fredmugs
07-15-2012, 15:58
I don't understand why it has become so commonplace to detract from the trail experience by the continual addition of electronics connecting people to the outer world - the trail is a narrow little strip of wild - bringing in kindles and laptops and unnecessary cell phone use really detracts from backpacking for me - besides - the lucky feeling of picking up a used paperback at a shelter is missing too. HYOH

Don't you love it when someone passes judgement on you and then ends their no value added commentary with HYOH?

BrianLe
07-16-2012, 01:38
Cassie_Bee wrote:

"... and so I would not advise someone to bring a Kindle on a hike unless they were ready to accept it possibly being broken no matter what they do."

In contrast, I used a smartphone on all three thru-hikes as well as on other significant backpacking trips with no problem. I used the same one for the PCT and the AT, switched to a newer one with a bigger screen for the CDT. The original one is still functional, just sadly very obsolete compared to what's available now. The newer one is still in excellent shape.

I don't read a lot on the trail, barring early/late season times when the nights are too long to sleep through. But when I do, I'm quite happy to read on the phone screen. My wife owns a Kindle and I've enjoyed using that at home and travelling, but I can't imagine carrying it on the trail in favor of a smaller, lighter and more generally useful smartphone.

freckles
07-17-2012, 16:07
bet it's heaver than three pages torn out of the companion (inc. elevations and miles) and my Garmin Forerunner (with an altimeter) and a copy of The Dharma Bums

I bet it's not. My Nook Simple Touch weighs 7 oz. I'm not sure what exact version of The Dharma Bums you have, but most mass market paperbacks weigh around 6-8 oz. I just weighed a few books- even my lightest one (A Wrinkle in Time, which is a short kids book) is 4 oz.

E-readers aren't for everyone, but they're definitely lighter weight than carrying a couple of paperbacks. I can easily go through 2-3 books a week... that weight adds up quickly.

I suggest getting a nook with the extended protection plan to anyone considering bringing an e-reader on a thru hike. With the extended plan, B&N will replace your device if you break it for ANY reason within 2 years. Some stores can even do same day replacement.

vamelungeon
07-17-2012, 19:05
Weight Kindle 1, 2
10.2 oz (290 g)
Kindle 3
8.7 oz (247 g)
Kindle 3 Wi-Fi only
8.5 oz (241 g)
Kindle Touch
7.8 oz (220 g)
Kindle Touch Wi-Fi only
7.5 oz (213 g)
Kindle DX 2
18.9 oz (540 g)
Kindle 4
5.98 oz (170 g)