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Tramp
03-04-2012, 21:52
Does anyone hav exp. With these boots ? Thay look good, have good reviews & have all the right stuff. Would like to here from anyone with them. Do thay last? Any problems with them? Tks.

Tinker
03-05-2012, 00:58
Alico makes very decent boots. I have a pair labeled EMS which was made by them. Norwegian welted Vibram soles, stiff cuff and very heavy. They don't fit as well as they used to before I developed foot problems, so I just use them for heavy yard work lately.

Like many folks here, I've discovered low-topped, non-waterproof, breathable lightweight hiking shoes. They're all you'll ever need for the AT unless you plan on hiking in snow.

No one can accurately recommend a brand or model of shoe or boot for your foot online, however. Since all feet are different, I suggest shopping for fit first and then choose between a few models which meet your particular criteria.

The best spec'd boots that don't fit well might end your hike due to blisters.

Tramp
03-05-2012, 09:38
Sound advice tinker, and thank you ! I guess I'm over thinking this. I know it won't be shoes, just don't know how much boot I need. I've always had hunting boots and cowboy boots. Its hard to wrap my head around some of these little light wt. Fabric "boots" . I know fit and comfort is everything, but confidence in your boot is needed also so I'm just going with what I know or think I know.

arson51
05-11-2012, 14:40
It may be a bit late to respond to this post, but I would like to comment provide a counter argument to Tinker.

I do own a pair of Alico's. Those particular boots are a "half shank" type boot, so they are more flexible than other backpacking boots, and they come with a "thinner" vibram sole. They are actually thicker than most modern injection molded boots, but in comparison to other monster boots I own, they are considered thin soled. I usually wear wides, but Alico's are all naturally wider, so I had to switch to a normal width. A great deal I must say from STP.

It is true that more and more of the shoes hiking on the AT and on other trails are increasingly lighter and more focused on fast drying for the summer months. In my very unofficial visual survey of footwear being worn on the AT, a good portion, maybe half of the footwear hitting the trail on the AT are mid top type boots made of leather and Goretex. An even smaller portion of those, myself included wear older style boots that are non Goretex lined leather boots, like the Alico's you have listed, Tramp. Leather boots excel in an early spring hike, and an early autumn hike too, but even in the Summer months, I found that with thin wool socks, leather boots are not horrible for you or uncomfortable by any means. They are in fact leaps and bounds cooler and more moisture wicking than GoreTex. And of course, once my hike of the AT was completed, my full leather boots were resoled, instead of being mailed back to the manufacturer for a free new pair (which most hikers seem to do) , or begging REI for a new set(claiming that a pair of boots should be able to hike for more than 1000+ miles). I had a set of broken in boots, that fit me, and I felt good that I did not send a pair of boots to the landfill. I hope you chose to go with the Alicos! Happy hiking.

sstoots
04-05-2019, 11:40
It may be a bit late to respond to this post, but I would like to comment provide a counter argument to Tinker.

I do own a pair of Alico's. Those particular boots are a "half shank" type boot, so they are more flexible than other backpacking boots, and they come with a "thinner" vibram sole. They are actually thicker than most modern injection molded boots, but in comparison to other monster boots I own, they are considered thin soled. I usually wear wides, but Alico's are all naturally wider, so I had to switch to a normal width. A great deal I must say from STP.

It is true that more and more of the shoes hiking on the AT and on other trails are increasingly lighter and more focused on fast drying for the summer months. In my very unofficial visual survey of footwear being worn on the AT, a good portion, maybe half of the footwear hitting the trail on the AT are mid top type boots made of leather and Goretex. An even smaller portion of those, myself included wear older style boots that are non Goretex lined leather boots, like the Alico's you have listed, Tramp. Leather boots excel in an early spring hike, and an early autumn hike too, but even in the Summer months, I found that with thin wool socks, leather boots are not horrible for you or uncomfortable by any means. They are in fact leaps and bounds cooler and more moisture wicking than GoreTex. And of course, once my hike of the AT was completed, my full leather boots were resoled, instead of being mailed back to the manufacturer for a free new pair (which most hikers seem to do) , or begging REI for a new set(claiming that a pair of boots should be able to hike for more than 1000+ miles). I had a set of broken in boots, that fit me, and I felt good that I did not send a pair of boots to the landfill. I hope you chose to go with the Alicos! Happy hiking.
I just got my pair of Tahoe boots. Just started wearing them around the house and for dog walks. I conditioned them with NiWax and fitted my TurboMed AFO brace on the left boot (bad foot-drop issue). Initially I havenít experienced the leather stiffness many vocalize. I donít find them overtly heavy either (over 2 pounds per boot). That said, Iím not carrying 35 pounds on my back either for 10 hours a day. I did buy them for my upcoming AT Trail hike (the entire Virginia portion of the trail). Iíll also take a pair of much lighter Merrell White Pines . When you consider the boot and the price ($149) as compared to any other handmade leather boot with a Norwegian welt, why spend $300 or more? Read the reviews . There are hundreds out there .