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Cherokee Bill
05-04-2012, 07:25
Hoping to do a Thru (NOBO) w/the Class of 2013. I will be 66-yo at that time, having retired this year (2012).
I am a Cancer Survivor and have the standard age challenges: aches/pain, move slower, etc.,etc.
I have however, been hiking the AT off/on since the early 80”s,so I do have some experience.
I wonder what tips/info folks have that completed a Thru,who were at least 60 or older at the time?

Hoop
05-04-2012, 07:42
Cinnamon (80+) 2011?

RETCW4
05-04-2012, 07:43
Hike your own hike. Go as light as you can and enjoy the experience. Hike at your own pace and listen to your body.

Tumbleweed

forrest!
05-04-2012, 08:08
Hike your own hike. Go as light as you can and enjoy the experience. Hike at your own pace and listen to your body.

Tumbleweed

Tumbleweed has good advice.

I'll be hitting the trail next year too, I hope. The biggest improvement I have made is to reduce the weight I am carrying, not only in the pack but on the body. Keep those joints moving between now and next year too - use it or lose it...

rocketsocks
05-04-2012, 08:24
Billyboy,what up yo? While not 60,my body feels 70,but having a since of humor can take a body far(at least that is my hope.....and belief)Judging by your avatar,I'd say you got that licked:pso here's hoping you stay healthy,humble and humorous!And in the words of my generation,"Go for it Yo":)

Moose2001
05-04-2012, 08:45
Try not to laugh at the young guys when you pass them going uphill!

Cookerhiker
05-04-2012, 08:49
Go at your own pace and don't worry about big miles, especially in the beginning i.e. start slowly. Hydration is important as is good nutrition i.e. better than Ramen. Lots of 60+ year-olds hike long distances. Weary was 64 when he hiked nearly the whole AT. Use trekking poles which not only preserve your knees on steep descents but also build up your triceps and help you on uphills.

At 63, I thruhiked the Colorado Trail last year - admittedly not as long as the AT but replete with challenges.

garlic08
05-04-2012, 09:04
When I hiked the AT, I spent my days trying to keep pace with Pickle, who was 64 at the time. Best advice I can think of for an older hiker is to work on lightening your load. Pickle and I both had a base weight (without food and water) of less than 10 pounds. We used our experience to practically eliminate small nagging problems like skin issues, gear issues, resupply problems, etc. We ate, hydrated, and rested very well. The hike went very smoothly and we had a lot of fun. What's the old saying--Age and treachery will overcome youth and skill?

double d
05-04-2012, 11:08
While taking a water break on the LT/AT in 2009, I got passed by a couple in their 60's or 70's and they were moving fast, as I later caught up to them and they were not thru-hiking, but hiking from Mass. border to Hanover, NH, so still a good distance. Go at your own pace, and enjoy the hiking.

oldbear
05-04-2012, 11:29
I too am heading NOBO in 2013 and with any luck I'll be celebrating my 60th birthday on the Presidentials where 40 years ago i got bit hard by the hiking bug
My strategy involves leaving myself over 200 days to do the hike - 208 to be exact
Where practical taking siestas
Reducing my bodyweight from it's current 255 ( I'm 6'2" ) to 235
Using hiking poles
Using a medium weight hiking boot
Being extremely deliberate when it comes to foot placement
One thing that I noticed about getting older is that you get injured faster and heal slower

Old Boots
05-04-2012, 12:45
Use knee support of some kind. It really helps especially on the down hill portions of the trail which I found particularly daunting. Pause at least hourly to take a few deep breaths it really increases your energy. You will find younger hikers are very supportive, respectful and appreciate your presence on the trail. When you get to be our age HYOH applies to a lot more than hiking.

rsmall
05-04-2012, 13:20
I was 61 when I did a thru in 2005. As a cancer survivor with arthritis in my knees and weighing 225 to start, I was wary of how it might go. Went slow early, and improved conditioning day by day. Monitored pack weight, used trek poles, wore light knee braces every day. Lost a lot of body weight along the way and finished at 175 pounds. Only took four zero days, but used neros as well to refresh physically and mentally when needed. The physical challenge was daunting, but the mental aspects were far more significant in being able to continue and complete the trail. My mental set was that I would stop my hike without completion only if a severe family emergency arose or I was carried off the trail in a stretcher. I must say that good luck played a part as well. Overcame numerous painful falls and one near lightning strike that buzzed me pretty good. Enjoy your hike.

peakbagger
05-04-2012, 17:09
I am not there yet but many older hikers swore by daily glucosamine supplements started three months in advance of the hike.

Cherokee Bill
05-18-2012, 20:20
Thanks so much my friend! Live w/n 20-mi of the Priest (on the AT) so I hiked to the top this past Thursday! Going up was not bad, but coming down my knees cursed me all the way! So I am hitting the "Y" more than normal in an attempt to build up the body!

Will attempt a number of section-hikes to give me an idea of what the body can tolerate at 65-yo! Been doing the AT since the early 80's, but as you know, age, time and cancer (Bladder Cancer "09") seems to take its toll, regardless of how hard we try to take care of our selves!

You know, I cannot find one person my age here in Forest, that wants to Backpack! Seems everyone here over 50 want to play golf!

rainmaker
05-18-2012, 22:23
Hike your own hike. Go as light as you can and enjoy the experience. Hike at your own pace and listen to your body.

Tumbleweed

Amen. Do not get caught up in the need to hike with someone. HYOH.

Nitrojoe
05-19-2012, 15:22
I cracked my right upper femur bone this year on the AT. It was caused by a fall just short of Standing Bear hostel somewhere around mile 240. At first It didnt bother me so I continued on. Just six miles out of Demascus I got this severe pain in my upper femur bone and I hopped into Damascus and off the trail. Iam a thru hiker and in good shape. Work out all the time and try hard to keep my body fit. My pack weight with food and water varies anywere from 25 to 35 lps. I use hiking poles and drink two to three liters of filtered water a day. I eat healthy meals and snacks on the trails. I do tend to lose alot of wieght when I go on long hikes especially thrus. In 08 I lost 50 lbs on the PCT and I gained most of it back in a month. On the AT this year I lost 20 lbs in only 465 miles of hiking. I start very early anywere from 5 to 5:30 am on the trail and finish when Iam tired. My average trail speed is 2 mph and I like to do about 15 mile days. Every now and then Ill hit a 25 or 30 miler, but the conditions have to be just right. Remember to listen to your body and take yourself off the trail when conditions get bad. I plan on coming back in 2013 on April 08 and continuing my AT thru. Ill be 71 then. In 2010 I had a 4 way bypass and in 2011 I had a knee replacement and early this year I was told by my doctor that I have prostate cancer. You can do anything you set your mind and heart to do. In 2011 I saw an 86 year old backpacking the JMT with his three sons who were near my age and his four grand sons and his three great grand sons. Thats where I want to end up. Good luck to you on your adventures in life.

Papa D
05-19-2012, 18:46
Try not to laugh at the young guys when you pass them going uphill!

I'd focus on this post - you'll be just fine - go have fun - forget your age - just do it

Papa D
05-19-2012, 18:51
I'm not going to express my opinion on Ronald Reagan as a president here because my opinion is likely outside the mainstream and is inappropriate here but here is one funny moment for you regarding age:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJhCjMfRndk

rocketsocks
05-20-2012, 00:20
I'm not going to express my opinion on Ronald Reagan as a president here because my opinion is likely outside the mainstream and is inappropriate here but here is one funny moment for you regarding age:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJhCjMfRndk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJhCjMfRndk) +1 Papa D very funny indeed,and so very true.Thinking outside the box can keep a body young,and humor can only help.Many would do well to remember that.Laugh more,argue less.Reagans popularity soared after that debate.

moytoy
05-20-2012, 04:55
Try not to laugh at the young guys when you pass them going uphill!
I always laugh at the young guys when I pass them but they seem to always get the last laugh. Thats when a good sense of humor comes in handy.

tomman
05-20-2012, 07:06
Cherokee Bill,
I would love to do some planning to hike with you. I am 76 years old and have COPD which means I will have to start slow until my lungs get build up to handle the mountains. My Doctor tells me that if i take it easy in the beginning I should be alright. I may have a bit of trouble going up the mountains in the beginning but if I stay after it after a few miles I should be able to hike at a fairly good pace.

I have started working out around here in Texas, the problem being I do not have any mountains to climb for exercise. I ca work out in the gym on weight wand treadmills and may be some stair climbers. I think the main thing I need to do is just walk until I can get up to 5 to 6 miles every day. What are you doing to get into shape?

I have most of my gear and I have been trying to keep it very light with out going so light that I get into trouble. I know what the weather is like on the trail so I plan to dress accordingly. Then when the weather lets up I can send some things home.

Let me know what you think?

Why did you choose Cherokee Bill? I chose mine because I am part Cherokee and my greatgreatgrandfather was named Cherokee Tom.
Tom Mantooth
Cherokee Tom

Cherokee Bill
05-20-2012, 20:34
Cherokee Bill,
I would love to do some planning to hike with you. I am 76 years old and have COPD which means I will have to start slow until my lungs get build up to handle the mountains. My Doctor tells me that if i take it easy in the beginning I should be alright. I may have a bit of trouble going up the mountains in the beginning but if I stay after it after a few miles I should be able to hike at a fairly good pace.

I have started working out around here in Texas, the problem being I do not have any mountains to climb for exercise. I ca work out in the gym on weight wand treadmills and may be some stair climbers. I think the main thing I need to do is just walk until I can get up to 5 to 6 miles every day. What are you doing to get into shape?

I have most of my gear and I have been trying to keep it very light with out going so light that I get into trouble. I know what the weather is like on the trail so I plan to dress accordingly. Then when the weather lets up I can send some things home.

Let me know what you think?

Why did you choose Cherokee Bill? I chose mine because I am part Cherokee and my greatgreatgrandfather was named Cherokee Tom.
Tom Mantooth
Cherokee Tom

Sent you a PM, but as usual the DAMN server seemed to crash, so I do not know if it got out or not. Happens to me all the time lately, don't know why I renewed my Donating Memberrship?????

Keep in touch by "PM"

rmitchell
05-20-2012, 21:36
You may want to check out trailjournals.com. Listed in 2012 AT hikers is MamawB (Barbara Allen). She is 72 years old and presently doing a thru hike. I met her on the trail around Pearisburg a coulple of weeks ago.

Cherokee Bill
05-21-2012, 20:35
You may want to check out trailjournals.com. Listed in 2012 AT hikers is MamawB (Barbara Allen). She is 72 years old and presently doing a thru hike. I met her on the trail around Pearisburg a coulple of weeks ago.
------------------
2nd try at a response! Damn server crapped on me agin here!

Thanks for the reply! Have read all her posts and have bookmarked it as well.

WhoAh
07-28-2012, 22:00
You might also want to read Hopeful's journal. He has done the Trail twice now, the last time in 2011.

http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=11473

I'm up there with you (63 y/o), and wheras I am not going to attempt another Thru (tried it in 2007 and screwed my knee up in the Smokies), I will be up there in March going for a couple of weeks. Like a the others have said - easy does it from the start (Georgia is the training grounds...), keep you base weight down, rest often, and just have a ball. It's your journey, not the blokes who go rocking by you and are doing the big mileages.

Hairbear
07-29-2012, 00:56
Hoping to do a Thru (NOBO) w/the Class of 2013. I will be 66-yo at that time, having retired this year (2012).
I am a Cancer Survivor and have the standard age challenges: aches/pain, move slower, etc.,etc.
I have however, been hiking the AT off/on since the early 80s,so I do have some experience.
I wonder what tips/info folks have that completed a Thru,who were at least 60 or older at the time?

hope to see you out there good luck

Wil
07-29-2012, 02:27
I've considered doing the AT during just about every post-teenage age decade to date (declined to being in bad shape in my 30s but subsequently smartened up). Unfortunately, Pennsylvania is always there. I'll keep taking a look every once in a while, just in case.

Winds
07-29-2012, 03:36
Hoping to do a Thru (NOBO) w/the Class of 2013.

I have not the wisdom to offer but the presence to think: Wishing you great success in your epic journey!

~ Cheers

Papa D
07-29-2012, 07:41
You can do more than you think you can - - for starters, stop comparing yourself to other people your age and take what naysayers say with a big grain of salt - - sure, start out slowly in GA - probably everybody should do that but I would say that you shouldn't plan on "taking it easy" - the hike will be hard. If you start hiking at 4:30 am most mornings, you will have about an hour+ jump on your younger thru peers - - they might pass you later in the day but you will be surprised how you will end up at the same spot as most almost every night. You won't be the fastest and that's obviously not your goal but don't sell yourself short either. Here is a link to an article about a guy I'm striving to be like when I'm his age - right now, he's probably in better shape than me and he has me by over 30 years!

fatshapetofitshape.blogspot.com/2011/10/don-wildman-profile-circuit-esquire.html

wannahike
07-29-2012, 08:58
[QUOTE=billyboy;1290025]Thanks so much my friend! Live w/n 20-mi of the Priest (on the AT) so I hiked to the top this past Thursday! Going up was not bad, but coming down my knees cursed me all the way! So I am hitting the "Y" more than normal in an attempt to build up the body!

At the gym make sure that you equally exercise your quads and hamstrings, if there is an imbalance it can really mess with your knees.

SawnieRobertson
07-29-2012, 13:02
Granma Soule. She was tiny. I've run across descriptions in trail books about the author's encounter with her on the trail. She would be mistaken for a little boy because of her pace as well as her size. There were all sorts of factors that probably helped her be the hiker she was. For one thing she had a very supportive husband, Ken. He respected her sport; she, his, which was golf. In one conversation she told me that she kept so able by doing a daily 8-mile walk on a course which she had made out. She trusted others. She believed in AT thruhikers. Her pack was not what we would describe as light weight. I visited Shaw's one time, and Mrs. Shaw and I exchanged Granma Soule stories. She described Verna's morning when she was putting on her pack as she began her trek through the 100-mile Wilderness.
Verna was carrying 10 days worth of food. So were the others (men) who were taking off at the same time. They were struggling to get their packs on. Verna just leaned over, threw it over her head, let it settle into place, and was ready to go. A few years later she tried a thru feeling not quite so strong as she had previously. When she got to Hot Springs, Ken came for her. She was exhausted. It was the second time during that attempt that he had come for her at her request. That time though she changed her mind and set out again without his giving her a grumpy bad time of it. (I may have got that out of sequence, but both occurred that year.) A later year, maybe the next, she was going to do a supported thru. She sent me her planned itinerary. Every day from Day One was a 12-mile hike. She did that quite well through Massachusetts. Then Lyme hit her as she approahed Manchester Center. A tiny tick was found in her ear. She went home permanently that time. Then cancer overtook her a year or so later, and she died. From her I learned that it is not how old you are. It is how much you weigh. (Not just the pack.) And how devoted you are to your sport, preparing for it daily. And not being fearful, having faith in other hikers. (Not looking for a "snake" behind every bush.) Doing what you can, not what others can. She remains my inspiration, and I do not blame my being older than the AT for any lack of ability to walk it. It is mostly prep, attitude, devotion to giving it another try.

SawnieRobertson
07-29-2012, 16:34
Hours later after posting the above note about Verna Soule (Granma Soule) I have come across a short letter that she sent me in 1998. In it she says "I have backpacked since 1974. Have done the A. T. (thru hike) in 1987." When she wrote that she was a lot older than most of those who have posted on this thread, being concerned about their age. After that I know of the two attempts she made which I mentioned.

Drybones
07-29-2012, 18:10
Age is a case of mind over matter...if you dont mind it dont matter.

Gettin old seems bad....until you consider the alternative.

Go for the gusto!

Grampie
07-29-2012, 18:32
I thru hiked when I was 66 years old. My advise would be: take your time, do 8 to 10 mile days until you get into trail shape. It will take 4 to 6 weeks . Take a "0" every 5 days until you get into trail shape. Learn to eat something every 2 hours. Start drinking water before you get thirsty. Carry a good sleeping pad. (I used a Thermal Rest). Start taking glucosamine & chondroitin, 1500 mg daily. Start now. Walk bear foot as much as you can to toughen up your feet. Most of all 'hike your own hike." There will be plenty of rabbits out there. You are the hair.

Charlestonyankee
08-20-2012, 17:10
Sounds familiar, I retired May 2012 and will start a AT thru hike in 2013. I will be doing a short hike end of Aug on the Mohawk trail in CT.

Drybones
08-20-2012, 19:58
Billyboy...good luck on your hike. I'm 63, tried a thru hike this spring, made it 414 miles and was forced to stop due to old torn cartilage issues in the knees. I will return in the spring and take up where I left off. I believe I know now how to better care for the knees. Lessons learned: 1) you can still do 20+ miles per day but do it in 10 hours instead of 8. 2) eat better, good food is better than a light pack, more protein. 3) Take glucosimine, it's worth the ounces of weight. 3) When the knees start to flare up, stop and ice them asap. 4) I actually enjoyed hiking more once the knees forced me to slow down...smell the roses. 5) Hike when you feel like hiking, rest when you feel like resting.

GRRRR
08-20-2012, 20:19
I'll be 66 this Dec and part of the class of 2013 in March. Hope to see you then.

BFI
08-21-2012, 14:26
Food... know what your body needs to perform at a high calorie burn rate. I found Pastas the best for me. ( I’m 61). When I got into towns I loaded up on salads and red meat. Lots of people have said it , Hike your own hike, it’s not a race. Do everything possible to stay healthy. Young ones bounce back from illness sooner . Be fastidious about bathroom procedures. Don’t eat from other hikers gorp bags. Use the lightest equipment you can afford & use hiking poles. Most of all enjoy every step you take.

BFI
08-21-2012, 14:30
I met these two this spring just north of Pearisburg one is 82 the other 78 17110

LeConte
08-26-2012, 15:41
I'll be 70 when I start on March 10, 2013. I have hike a lot of the trail but next year I want to thru hike and get this monkey of completed sections here and there off my back! I have hike a lot in the Whites. Believe me everyone, they are to be respected but not to be feared. I fear the Smoky Mountains more then the Whites. The Smokies can make love to you with sunshine in the latter part of March and smack you down with three feet of snow the next day and below zero temperatures. I should be entering the Smokies about April 1...that's a little early but I am not putting off starting until April. If it gets bad in the Smokies, I'll skip them and start at Davenport Gap. Not like I haven't hiked the AT in the Smokies 14 times before. :-)

SouthMark
08-26-2012, 17:14
I'll be 66 next May and I have talked with my wife that if I do not do it now I may never be able to. I had hoped to do the JMT next August but doing the AT was always my first dream.

hermit
08-26-2012, 20:16
I will be 66 in 1/13. I plan on starting 3/1/13 from GA. Hope to run into you on the trail.

Cherokee Bill
11-05-2012, 08:34
Will admit that till today, I had about lost the desire to do a Thru! Seems arthritis in the left foot and new minor pain in the left leg has caused doubts!!!!

But, reading all these posts has re-newed my long-time desire to get that Thru done. That being said, I am behind in planning and so now must get REAL busy, as I would probably be looking at a MARCH start!

Will be looking to meet ALL of you folks along the way!

Happy Holidays, and happy/ safe hiking till we meet!

Cherokee Bill (aka billyboy)

Karma13
11-05-2012, 10:11
Looking forward to meeting you on the trail, Billyboy. Good luck with your preparations!

weary
11-05-2012, 11:02
I observed my 64th birthday two weeks into my long walk in 1993 that ended on Katahdin 6 months and 3 days later. Now 83 I don't climb many mountains, but still work at maintaining my town's land trust trails. I did wander up an unmarked side trail a month ago and ended unexpectedly on the AT on Saddleback. My problem was I couldn't find the "trail" I had come up, so with the help of a couple of long distance AT hikers bivouaced on the trail. To my everlasting embarrassment, two wardens and a member of my party showed up a couple of hours later and guided me back down in the dark. I now only hike trails when there is plenty of daylight left.

SawnieRobertson
11-05-2012, 16:50
I am totally loving this thread. Thanks.

oneoldgoat
11-06-2012, 11:08
Good heavens - I have the same problem! Can't find anyone even interested in going with me for a week! I, too, like Tumbleweed's advice and will take i as well.

Best of luck to you :)

oneoldgoat
11-06-2012, 11:10
I am totally loving this thread. Thanks.

I am loving this thread too! I see you are from Phippsburg - my kids and I camp up on the beach every summer. Beautiful!

Cherokee Bill
11-06-2012, 23:44
My Dr told me today I should forget a Thru hike, for Medical reasons. I have sleep apnea and use a Bipap. I am NOT obese, but rather have a structural weakness of the airway!
He said that to go off the Bipap for months, would entail serious health risks!

Decisions, decisions! :confused:

Sugarfoot
11-07-2012, 08:53
I am so sorry, Cherokee Bill, that you won't be thru-hiking in 2013. I have my annual physical scheduled next week and the thought has already occurred to me, "What if he finds something?" Aging isn't for cowards. It must be really hard for you, since you can see the mountains from Forest.

SawnieRobertson
11-07-2012, 21:58
I learned a long time ago that doctors have lots of knowledge but not necessarily the knowledge that they need for some things. Is your doctor a hiker? That is the #1 question. If you are fortunate enough to have one who has hiked at least some of the AT, you have someone who probably knows exactly what challenges you would face. OTOH, your doctor may just be making a decision about how things could be--you know, the zebra instead of the donkey sort of thing. For something as important to you as this, you probably should get a second and maybe a third opinion. Otherwise, you may regret not having done so later. Good luck

Drybones
11-07-2012, 22:21
I'm not going to express my opinion on Ronald Reagan as a president here because my opinion is likely outside the mainstream and is inappropriate here but here is one funny moment for you regarding age:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJhCjMfRndk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJhCjMfRndk)

I've watched that many times...and it's still funny...RR was a class act.

MuddyWaters
11-09-2012, 19:45
There was a thru this yr I met north of Erwin for a couple days, 74yo went by Padre (retired episcopal minister I think).

MuddyWaters
11-09-2012, 19:50
There are a lot of people with sleep apnea out there in shelters on the trail, not overweight either.

Wise Old Owl
11-09-2012, 21:19
I met these two this spring just north of Pearisburg one is 82 the other 78 17110

I am so glad you posted this... but you failed to mention they started in Georgia some 40 years ago!:eek:

Seriously nice pic...

Wise Old Owl
11-09-2012, 21:22
My Dr told me today I should forget a Thru hike, for Medical reasons. I have sleep apnea and use a Bipap. I am NOT obese, but rather have a structural weakness of the airway!
He said that to go off the Bipap for months, would entail serious health risks!

Decisions, decisions! :confused:


IF you can afford it - go get a ear-nose and throat specialist in your area and get the operation.

I have had several plates in the nose and the uvula removed - it has made a terrific difference and because I have a deviated septum in the nose I breathe better too. Get er done!

form
11-11-2012, 16:37
i'm 67 and hike most days,my base pack is down to the low 20's,i hope to hike the at this spring,i would like to leapfrog with someone if posibble,meaning leave one vehicle at each end every day.traderjoe

Pedaling Fool
11-11-2012, 19:47
I know it's somewhat of a cliche, but I feel better today than I did 20 years ago -- I'm 48 now; I also feel as though I'm getting more healthy every day.

Whatever you do, thru-hike or not, you gotta stay active, even when you don't feel like it. Every activity requires a breakthrough period, in which you're working out through intense boredom. I remember when I was trying to get into running, the first week was always relatively easy, but then the boredom sets in, even if you try and mix it up, such as running a different route, didn't matter, because you were still doing the same boring thing -- running.

I remember those thoughts that would creep into my head, such as, "Maybe I need to take the day off, to rest the body" WRONG! You need to keep running (or whatever you're doing), even if it's at a slower pace than normal, just run, because you're doing something good for your body, even at a slow pace. But more importantly you're developing the discipline needed.

I now don't have to worry about that any more, because I've broken through that barrier and I now know I'm a runner for life.


I also believe weightlifting is crucial for the body, especially the aging body. Here's a very interesting/motivating article of a 93-year old guy that got into it only six years ago http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20048675

Jeff
11-11-2012, 20:51
Good advice JG !!

Snowleopard
11-12-2012, 17:54
'sleep apnea' I'd say see an ENT about that to see if surgery is an option. Your doctor is right that sleep apnea can cause very serious problems. I hope you can come up with a way to do all or part of the AT.

There was some discussion on WB about portable CPAPs quite a while ago. What I recall is that there used to be a portable battery CPAP, but it is no longer produced. It might be worth researching it again.

There was somebody this year who was doing a day hike through hike. He met his wife each night at a road crossing and slept in motels. A car battery might drive an inverter with enough power to run a CPAP, but this would be too heavy to hike with.

Slow n' Steady
11-18-2012, 10:54
The doctors have also told me that I should not do a thru-hke, but they don't hike. When I am out there with my backpack on a long (one month or more) trek, many of the aches and pains that I have on a daily basis somehow disappear. At my advanced age of 61 (and I will turn 62 on the trail), I am more worried than I was in my 40s, but I hold on to the mantra that "Quitting is not an option." All the worries that were stated here have gone through my head, too, but they are just monkeys messing with your mind. I am looking forward to meeting all of you in 2013!

Pedaling Fool
11-18-2012, 12:20
The doctors have also told me that I should not do a thru-hke, but they don't hike. Ha! That reminds me of this I just read before logging on:

"The few ad hoc soulutions I've found would appall your therapist. But does your therapist run?"


In running calendar book, talking about pain, suffering and despair while training.

Abner
11-18-2012, 21:20
Best advice I can give you is go to a gym and work on your quads and all leg muscles. And take many training hikes with a bit more weight and stress than you will encounter over the long haul. If you start now you can do alot to strengthen your legs and the stability of your knees with wieght training in a gym. It is my understanding that many knee problems occur because the stabalizing muscles, quads and others, are too weak. I remember reading several posts as I was struggling with some knee pain from hiking (for the first time in my life!) and discovered that even young folks who don't seriously work on their legs before long descents in the mountains can find themselves straining their connective tissue and cushioning tissue in the knees simply because the large leg muscles are not properly strenghtened and conditioned. Good luck.