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View Full Version : Rehydrating and eating it cold - stoveless question.



10-K
06-21-2012, 21:19
So my last several hiking trips I've went stoveless and am a convert, at least for warm weather.

So far I've made wraps and more other foods that obviously are not cooked or heated but I'm wanting to experiment.

I bought some red beans and rice mix today at the co-op.. The directions say to boil 1.75 cups of water, add 1 cup of red beans & rice, return to boil for 5 minutes and then simmer for 15 minutes.

What would happen if I just put 1 cup of mix into 1.75 cups of water 2 hours before I stopped for the evening? Would it rehydrate enough to eat cold?

I'm going to experiment but figured I'd ask in case anyone has any tips for this kind of things. Also picked up a bunch of dried veggies and soup mixes I'm going to play with.

Object of the game is to eat relatively healthy and go stoveless on my Long Trail E2E in August....

WingedMonkey
06-21-2012, 21:27
The beans will never
plump" up. As for the rice, unless it says "pre-cooked" on the ingredients label they will never be soft.

In my experience.

10-K
06-21-2012, 21:33
Dangit...

I'll report back.

p.s. what *can* you add water too and have it ready to eat a few hours later?

WingedMonkey
06-21-2012, 21:45
Dangit...

I'll report back.

p.s. what *can* you add water too and have it ready to eat a few hours later?

In your weight per meal range? LOL

10-K
06-21-2012, 21:54
I'm thinking some cold stovetop stuffing made with creek water and a pack of cold chicken. Yummy!

WingedMonkey
06-21-2012, 22:12
Mashed potatoes do fine with air temp water.

Hairbear
06-21-2012, 23:37
The beans will never
plump" up. As for the rice, unless it says "pre-cooked" on the ingredients label they will never be soft.

In my experience.

yup you will crunch rice when eat and toot beans when you sleep

Smooth & Wasabi
06-21-2012, 23:44
I would think most freezer bag meals would rehydrate in a couple hours but I've never tried. Cous-Cous, instant grits, oatmeal, ramen, instant rice, refried beans, etc in addition to the afore mentioned stuffing and potatoes. Powdered hummus works well and is instant. Some deserts too like instant pudding or cheesecake.(oops I missed healthy on my first read) I wonder if you would come out ahead weight wise on average through the day carrying the extra 1/12 -2 cups of water for a couple hours vs the lightest cook kits like a ti trappers mug over a campfire or esbit though I am not up for the math of it and it does not address the very real advantage of simplicity going stoveless provides.

Hairbear
06-21-2012, 23:48
Dangit...

I'll report back.

p.s. what *can* you add water too and have it ready to eat a few hours later? instant pudding, instant cheese cake, cheese sauces poured on chickweed or other found veggies, cup o soup from bouloun cubes, whey protien shakes

Snowleopard
06-22-2012, 00:00
I like this no cook chicken cranberry couscous salad:
http://www.trailcooking.com/recipes/no-cook-chicken-cranberry-couscous-salad (http://www.trailcooking.com/recipes/no-cook-chicken-cranberry-couscous-salad)
Look around the website and there are other recipes that would work. You can also buy Sarah's book:
http://www.trailcooking.com/store/freezer-bag-cooking-trail-food-made-simple (http://www.trailcooking.com/store/freezer-bag-cooking-trail-food-made-simple)
There are instant black beans available that would probably work as no cook.

Different Socks
06-22-2012, 01:59
It can be over 100 on the PCT or anywhere else i am hiking and I will always prefer a cooked meal. That's why I laugh at the people that are eating a cold meal while they salivate as a reaction to my hot food aromas, and they are eating cold food instead.
Just sayin......

Creek Dancer
06-22-2012, 06:24
I make a cold "pasta" salad using ramen noodles. About 2 or 3 hours before you intend to eat, add water and dehydrated veggies to the ramen. (Don't use the flavor pack. Nothing but chemicals anyway.) I put the ramen a heavy duty ziplock plastic bag which I then place inside something protective, like my cook pot, to protect the bag from leaking all over everything. When you are ready to eat, drain and squeeze off the water. Add mayo and a small can of chicken and you have cold pasta salad.

Wise Old Owl
06-22-2012, 10:09
The beans will never
plump" up. As for the rice, unless it says "pre-cooked" on the ingredients label they will never be soft.

In my experience.

The rice would be gritty - but I think if you test refried beans and water in the kitchen - it should work. might be more than three hours. ( separate water bottle)

Slo-go'en
06-22-2012, 10:57
I think beans need to be cooked to make them easier to digest.

10-K
06-22-2012, 11:20
My kitchen lab is operational... :)

sarbar
06-22-2012, 12:28
If you beans are precooked and dried, they rehydrate just fine. Harmony House Food's beans are that way or you can dry canned ones (or home cooked). Couscous,, ramen noodles, taters, precooked and dried small pasta, preccoked and dried quinoa all work well.
Rice you have to cook. IMO even instant rice needs to be cooked (ie...boiling water poured over) for best results.

Spokes
06-22-2012, 12:48
Don't forget the infamous "Ramen Noodle Sandwich" trick. It could be a lifesaver!

Mags
06-22-2012, 14:05
That's why I laugh at the people that are eating a cold meal while they salivate as a reaction to my hot food aromas, and they are eating cold food instead.


How does the hot food aroma travel when you are outside of your tent and cooking in the rain? ;)

Being serious, there is no way better than another. Cold food is a good alternate for some people who just want to have a 'no muss, no fuss' approach to backpacking. Thrown down my ground cloth, eat my cous cous with pre-grilled chicken from the night before and take in the sound of silence, the brooks running by and the birds making their evening songs. Works for me, but I don't pretend it is the best way. Heck, most people (myself included) will do different systems depending on the trip. By myself? No cook. With my friend' and his five year old son? Hey, let's bring the stove, hot cocoa and those Mountain House meals. Because to a five year old boy, nothing is more cool than eating out of a bag!


With the very dry conditions found out in my neck of the woods, going cold really has an appeal.

I let you know how it works out this weekend. :)

10-K
06-22-2012, 14:19
Ok.. beans and rice was a failure.. 2 hours of soaking and the beans were ok but the rice (as predicted) was crunchy.

So, I'm thinking instant rice as a base with different mixes for flavoring with some kind of meat added to it.

What I need are some "instant beans" to go along with the instant rice - is there such a thing?

I got the lwrap thing down.. Breakfast is no problem either. I'd like to have something a bit snazzy for dinner though.

10-K
06-22-2012, 14:21
If you beans are precooked and dried, they rehydrate just fine. Harmony House Food's beans are that way or you can dry canned ones (or home cooked). Couscous,, ramen noodles, taters, precooked and dried small pasta, preccoked and dried quinoa all work well.
Rice you have to cook. IMO even instant rice needs to be cooked (ie...boiling water poured over) for best results.

Ah.. I missed this post before I just posted about the "instant beans".

Can you not just buy the base components (rice, beans, veggies, etc.) already dehydrated from some place and make your own meals?

The Cleaner
06-22-2012, 14:54
Heck,just leave all of your gear&go barefoot and live of what you find.Then start a blog....

10-K
06-22-2012, 15:24
Heck,just leave all of your gear&go barefoot and live of what you find.Then start a blog....

I was thinking more along the lines of moving into Jerry Cabin shelter....

The Cleaner
06-22-2012, 15:34
I was thinking more along the lines of moving into Jerry Cabin shelter....

There are a lot of blackberries there and mtn blueberries nearby.....good water there too.I always find it kind of funny when hikers put chemicals in water there...After all it is known as Coldsprings Mtn to the locals...

sarbar
06-22-2012, 16:00
http://www.harmonyhousefoods.com/Dehydrated-Beans_c_2.html This is what you want!

Spokes
06-22-2012, 16:07
Heck,just leave all of your gear&go barefoot and live of what you find.Then start a blog....

That's what Bigfoot did...... Well everything except start a blog.

10-K
06-22-2012, 16:10
http://www.harmonyhousefoods.com/Dehydrated-Beans_c_2.html This is what you want!

I bought these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001EPPZIW/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00

And Pintos too....

Did I do ok? This is a whole new area of interest - I really know nothing about.

Snowleopard
06-22-2012, 16:51
For me, Taste Adventure instant black beans rehydrate more easily than Harmony House. I haven't tried them without hot water but they should rehydrate pretty quickly:
http://tasteadventure.com/products/beans/index.htm

Rocket Jones
06-22-2012, 20:34
Look for instant refried beans, or dehydrate them yourself if so inclined. While I'm doing a tray of frijoles, I'll also do another of salsa out of a jar. The beans also make a pretty good thickening agent for meals you've added too much water to.

Wise Old Owl
06-23-2012, 08:24
Took some pinto beans that had been dried at the store and soaked them in water -checked last night and forgot about them - 18 hours later they were still somewhat crunchy and inedible.


They need to be precooked and sauced before drying.

Fiddleback
06-23-2012, 12:49
My Primus tea kettle and soda can stove have a combined weight of 6 oz. One ounce of alky is more than enough for a FBC meal, hot beverage and warm water for personal hygiene. For a two-night trip, that's a prorated 2 oz additional weight per hot meal compared to the weight saved by cold meals (although the recipes above seem to have heavier ingredients, i.e., less dehydrated food). I see no other advantage of cold meals aside from the time savings from not heating the water. But that's just my uninformed opinon...if the cold meals are 'preferred' or just taste better, go for it. Feeling full from a pleasant meal is one of the top 'comforts' on the trail...my informed opinion.;)

FB

perrymk
06-24-2012, 07:20
Ok.. beans and rice was a failure.. 2 hours of soaking and the beans were ok but the rice (as predicted) was crunchy.
Was this pre-cooked rice? I've seen that on the grocery shelves buy haven't tried it. Maybe you could try cooking the rice yourself, letting it dry, and then reconstituting with room temp water.

Another thought is, leaving it to soak in the sun. Of course this is a method of cooking that isn't always possible but it is essentially stoveless.

Anyway, I'm enjoying reading this experiment.

10-K
06-24-2012, 09:57
Was this pre-cooked rice? I've seen that on the grocery shelves buy haven't tried it. Maybe you could try cooking the rice yourself, letting it dry, and then reconstituting with room temp water.

Another thought is, leaving it to soak in the sun. Of course this is a method of cooking that isn't always possible but it is essentially stoveless.

Anyway, I'm enjoying reading this experiment.

I tried with instant white Minute Rice and it worked perfectly. Instant brown Minute Rice never got soft enough. I'm waiting on my freeze dried beans and freeze dried meats and veggies and I'm going to experiment with making meals. Should be fun - I think it's awesome to be able to make my own "mountain house" meals....

10-K
06-24-2012, 09:59
My Primus tea kettle and soda can stove have a combined weight of 6 oz. One ounce of alky is more than enough for a FBC meal, hot beverage and warm water for personal hygiene. For a two-night trip, that's a prorated 2 oz additional weight per hot meal compared to the weight saved by cold meals (although the recipes above seem to have heavier ingredients, i.e., less dehydrated food). I see no other advantage of cold meals aside from the time savings from not heating the water. But that's just my uninformed opinon...if the cold meals are 'preferred' or just taste better, go for it. Feeling full from a pleasant meal is one of the top 'comforts' on the trail...my informed opinion.;)

FB

FB, I get just a full from a cold meal and so far I haven't felt like I was missing anything by eating cold instead of hot meals. One of the things I like about being stoveless is having 1 less thing to have to keep up with, pack, and plan around.

FarmerChef
06-24-2012, 11:50
Perhaps chiming in a bit late here...

Beans require heat in order to become soft. Just soaking is the "overnight" method found on many packages of raw beans at the grocery store. In either case, you must cook them at the end. That said, you can save a lot of money by making your own "instant" beans if you're up for dehydrating them. Just select your favorite beans. Cook per the directions or buy them canned and already cooked. Then dehydrate. The beans will split open because the skin dehydrates at a different rate than the starchy interior causing it to break open. This is what allows the bean to rehydrate more quickly. As long as you don't mind that look, the texture of the bean is the same in your mouth as the "normal one."

Also, refried beans are ridiculously easy to make yourself. A 1st generation Mexican family showed me how one afternoon and I've almost never bought them from the store again, blech! Just buy a bag of raw Pinto beans. You can get 'em for a song at an ethnic grocer. Then throw in onions, garlic, salt and chicken stock or bullion to taste. Cook them until soft. Then remove most of the water and pulverize them with a potato masher. Add extra water as needed. Those should dehydrate nicely and rehydrate just as easily, even cold. I'll bet you could run it through the blender once dried to make it even smoother/faster to rehydrate. Will have to test...

Other items that have been mentioned: any flour based product will soften up cold - pastas, tabbouleh, cous cous, stuffing, etc. If you don't have to rehydrate proteins (say foil chicken) then you could assemble a no-cook meal quite easily from that. I also use a tealight to gently warm the water I'm rehydrating in before I throw it on the stove. No muss, no fuss. Just light and go. The only advantage is a faster soak. If you're throwing it in a bottle and hiking it all afternoon then it shouldn't be necessary.

Please report back on your findings!

SheenBean
06-24-2012, 17:17
This isn't on beans, but I wanted to share one of my healthiest cold "breakfast" meals.

Flaxseed, almonds, oats, granola with dried fruit or chocolate pieces, soak 4-8 hrs before consuming to allow the nuts/seeds to soak/sprout. It allows your body to digest them more efficiently. If you want even more of a protein boost add some protein powder right before consumed.

I'll be following this thread closely, I'm doing the same thing next year. :)

10-K
06-24-2012, 17:22
This isn't on beans, but I wanted to share one of my healthiest cold "breakfast" meals.

Flaxseed, almonds, oats, granola with dried fruit or chocolate pieces, soak 4-8 hrs before consuming to allow the nuts/seeds to soak/sprout. It allows your body to digest them more efficiently. If you want even more of a protein boost add some protein powder right before consumed.

I'll be following this thread closely, I'm doing the same thing next year. :)

Dang, that sounds good - I bought some flaxseed not too long ago too. I'm going to give this a try.

LynnMT
06-24-2012, 20:51
There are dehydrated black and refried beans at our health food store. You may want to check out Scott Williamson's blog as he rehydrated like this while hiking the PCT.

Mags
06-24-2012, 21:16
So, I did an overnighter this past weekend. Due to the heat in Colorado (even at elevation!), I am very glad I went cold. Some cous cous, a little sun dried tomato and a tuna packet.

One of my major vices is that I love coffee. So, how to feed my caffiene addicition? Well, Star Bucks Via mixes quite well cold and tastes pretty decent. Mix it with snow from the remnants of snow packs? You have a KILLER backcountry iced coffee. Seriously:




16381

WingedMonkey
06-24-2012, 21:47
So, I did an overnighter this past weekend. Due to the heat in Colorado (even at elevation!), I am very glad I went cold. Some cous cous, a little sun dried tomato and a tuna packet.

One of my major vices is that I love coffee. So, how to feed my caffiene addicition? Well, Star Bucks Via mixes quite well cold and tastes pretty decent. Mix it with snow from the remnants of snow packs? You have a KILLER backcountry iced coffee. Seriously:




16381

Giving 10-K any advice on how to get caffeine in his veins will make you his friend for life.
:p