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smsinnh
08-19-2012, 21:11
Hi: are cannisters readily available on the trail for pocket rocket? thanks 2013 hiker wannabe

Donde
08-19-2012, 23:18
Yes they are.

Blissful
08-20-2012, 07:32
Canisters are readily available in most areas, but you can safely mail them also. They must go surface mail (not by air).

Spokes
08-20-2012, 09:17
Most thru hikers know to check the hiker boxes for "empties" which end up being between a quarter to half full when tossed. A fellow I hiked with in 2009 only bought a couple new cannisters for his JetBoil the entire hike. Pays to look......

Aquonehostel
08-31-2012, 12:07
Hi: are cannisters readily available on the trail for pocket rocket? thanks 2013 hiker wannabe
Aquone Hostel Nantahala NC carries canisters 828 321 2340 www.aquonecabins.com/at.html Hiked with the Pocket-Rocket in 2010, loved it! Wiggy Thru-hiker 2010

mountain squid
08-31-2012, 12:27
http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-signs087.gifto WB!

You'll likely find canisters when needed, but mostly only at Outfitters (or occasionally in hiker boxes as mentioned), which may not always be convenient to the trail. Coleman fuel and denatured alcohol, on the other hand, are often available at hostels and other establishments along the trail. You can easily top off your fuel bottle and pay per the ounce.

See you on the trail,
mt squid

maintenance videos (http://www.youtube.com/user/mountainsquid04/videos)

"Atlas"
10-14-2012, 19:00
I never had a hard time finding fuel for my Jet Boil. In fact I found most of mine in Hikers Boxes. You can even find them in a local Walmart and in most stores along the trail. I do wish the canisters had a gauge that told you how much fuel was remaining. You can shake the canister, but really, its a gas and not the liquid type.

perrymk
10-15-2012, 07:32
I do wish the canisters had a gauge that told you how much fuel was remaining. You can shake the canister, but really, its a gas and not the liquid type.
I readily admit that sometimes I have too much time on my hands and crazy notions pop into my head. This project is to help determine how much fuel is left in a canister.

Start with a small postal balance ($5-10 online), a Crunch-It tool ($5-10 online), and a paperclip ($?).
http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee251/perrymk/backpacker/balancestartsmall.jpg

Use the paperclip to hook the CrunchIt tool to the postal scale.
http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee251/perrymk/backpacker/balance0small.jpg

With a 100 gram calibration weight (3.5 ounces), the balance reads 1 ounce.
http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee251/perrymk/backpacker/balance100small.jpg

With a 200 gram calibration weight (7 ounces), the balance reads 2 ounces, with a 300 gram calibration weight (10.5 ounces), the balance reads 3 ounces.

Next is a used IsoPro canister. When new, the canister had 113 grams (4 ounces) of fuel and a total weight of 231 grams (8 ounces). The balance reads 2 ounces, which corresponds to 200 grams (7 ounces). This weight was verified using a digital scale. Thus about 30 grams (1 ounce) of fuel has been used and 90 grams (3 ounces) of fuel remain. http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee251/perrymk/backpacker/balancecanistersmall.jpg

The postal scale itself weights about a 30 grams (1 ounce), the CrunchIt tool weighs about 30 grams (1 ounce). Together they weigh about 60 grams (2 ounces) and provide a range of 0 grams (0 ounces) to over 300 grams (10.5 ounces). That is, 0 to 100 grams (3.5 ounces) with the scale as is, and 100 grams (3.5 ounces) to 300 grams (10.5 ounces) with the addition of the CrunchIt tool.

Besides weighing canisters, think of the fun that could be had at the campsite!
"My tent stakes are lighter than yours, and I can prove it!"
"My wally-world grease pot is lighter than your titanium cookware!".
etc.

Starchild
10-15-2012, 08:44
I readily admit that sometimes I have too much time on my hands and crazy notions pop into my head. This project is to help determine how much fuel is left in a canister.

There is a much easier way and involved carrying nothing extra. Submerge the canister in water, make sure the bottom does not hold a air bubble and see how high it floats. The standard 100g jetboil ones will be close to fully submerged with just the top exposed above water when full of fuel. At about 1/3 fuel left the canister will float about 1/2 above the water. A little experimentation with the canisters you use should help determine how much fuel compared to how high above the water line it floats.


The down side to this method is you need water to do this, and that doesn't always work at the hiker boxes where you need to determine to take canister A or canister B.

Another method to compare in the field you can make a pendulum swing from a short length of string. The heavier one will swing slower and will swing back and forth longer then the lighter one - so count the swings till it dies down to what you consider to be finished swinging. This only really works when directly comparing the same bottle type. However since the swings are determined by density, (the amount of liquid compared to gas in the canister + canister metal weight) there may be a generalized consistency between sizes.

snifur
10-15-2012, 09:55
canisters are every where between GA and MA. no shortage at all. know how long a canister actually burns for you and your needs tho. most hikers i have found have no idea how long they can actually cook on one canister for. test it out in the comfort of your home before you go and cook every meal with it until the canister is empty. track your burn times so you know how long u can burn it for.

Altarboy
10-29-2012, 14:23
And as with any fuel it helps to have markings in your pot that tell you exactly how much water you have, then you only heat up the water you need and don't waste fuel.

perrymk
10-29-2012, 15:42
Another fuel saving tip I heard was to pre-heat the water. Either keep the bottle in your tent or sleeping bag for the morning or leave a bottle in the sun for a while prior to heating in the evening. It's not always practical but when it is, one has less heating to do.

peakbagger
10-29-2012, 16:01
The biggest way to save fuel is never boil the water. Many folks think they need to bring water to a full boil to kill all the nasties. In reality about 160 deg F for a few minutes works. Water takes 1 btu per pound of water to go up 1 degree F, its takes roughly 1000 btu's per pound to convert it to steam. The reason most sources cite bringing the water to a boil is that it is a easy visual way to make sure the water is hot enough. If the pot is too hot to touch without burning a finger its hot enough. Most of the lipton meals and instant rice will cook without boiling.