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Wyatt
08-27-2012, 03:30
Here's an article that provides an overview of different kinds of stoves, sorted by the type of fuel used.

http://www.realisticpreparedness.com/index.php/preparedness-articles/80-portable-stove-options

It gives the pros and cons for each kind of stove.

Maddog
08-27-2012, 08:15
Pmags has some great info on his site as well! http://www.pmags.com/stove-comparison-real-world-use
Maddog:D

colorado_rob
08-27-2012, 10:49
That last article is absolutely fantastic. One note though: It is a bit out of date on Jetboils. The newest (2012) "Sol titanium" is significantly lighter and seemingly even more efficient than the original. I just can't believe how little fuel this puppy uses. The system weighs 8.8 ounces, including the burner, pot, lid and cozy (LOSE the stupid little cup and stability stand). vs. 14.0 ounces for the older Jetboil. Add in a 7 ounce (4 oz fuel) cannister, and the total is 15.8 ounces for a very convenient stove with fuel to last about 7 days (my experience with two or three boils a day). If you only have 4-5 days between resupplies, maybe an Alchie comes in slightly better. But man, is the Jetboil fast and convenient. Everything I hear is that canisters are readily available, right?

Mags
08-27-2012, 11:06
That last article is absolutely fantastic. One note though: It is a bit out of date on Jetboils. The newest (2012) "Sol titanium" is significantly lighter and seemingly even more efficient than the original. I just can't believe how little fuel this puppy uses. The system weighs 8.8 ounces, including the burner, pot, lid and cozy (LOSE the stupid little cup and stability stand). vs. 14.0 ounces for the older Jetboil. Add in a 7 ounce (4 oz fuel) cannister, and the total is 15.8 ounces for a very convenient stove with fuel to last about 7 days (my experience with two or three boils a day). If you only have 4-5 days between resupplies, maybe an Alchie comes in slightly better. But man, is the Jetboil fast and convenient. Everything I hear is that canisters are readily available, right?

I'll have to quickly update it..but man, $150 to save 5 ounces? Ouch.

Seems like it was made to compete with the MSR Reactor.

Odd Man Out
08-27-2012, 13:46
I'll have to quickly update it..but man, $150 to save 5 ounces? Ouch.

Seems like it was made to compete with the MSR Reactor.

+1 - Nice article. I also appreciate including the campfire and no-cook options. Both common and viable alternatives in the right circumstances.

Longstrike
08-27-2012, 21:27
I plan to hike with minimal mail drops.
Is stove fuel readily available along the trail, or will I need to pack extra canisters between resupply points?
I would consider switching fuel types and stoves for convenience if anyone has suggestions

Treton
08-28-2012, 21:58
seems to me like the alcohol based bottle-type stoves take the cake in simplicity, effectiveness, and supply of fuel.

Starchild
08-29-2012, 09:57
One thing that I have not heard much about is use in real world conditions. I have used a jetboil with a electronic start which would ignite fast and hold a flame well in rain and wind. The flame was pretty well shielded from the worst of the elements and boil times in my experience are unaffected. In short it just worked each and every time and I didn't even have to consider it not working.

For the AT I have a alcohol stove, which I also have a windscreen, but I really can see that there may be difficulty under some conditions getting it to get to full burn and also not having the wind/rain extinguish the flame. I am planning a few short backpacks to help answer some of these issues and if alcohol proves difficult in poor conditions I may just go with the jetboil.

Anyone have some real world experience with alcohol stoves in adverse weather to share?

Mags
08-29-2012, 10:28
Anyone have some real world experience with alcohol stoves in adverse weather to share?

Cold, snowy and at 13k feet. I ate my food in a timely manner.

BrianLe
08-29-2012, 11:39
"Anyone have some real world experience with alcohol stoves in adverse weather to share?"

Wind: like you suggest, use with a wind screen. If particularly bad, I guess it's like putting up a tent: site selection is key. And/or use local rocks or something to block to worst of the wind so the windscreen can do the rest.

Rain: light rain isn't a problem. Heavy rain really not either once the stove is lit and a pot is on top of it, but in such situations I'll typically cook at the edge of (but under) my tent awning. I find this really doesn't happen that often, and I live in the PNW (Pacific NorthWest). I guess my normal approach for really heavy rain would be "munch a trail bar and wait half an hour".

I have a friend who just lo-o-oves his jetboil. It's one of his favorite things, and I could and would never talk him out of it. But I hiked with him a fair bit (260 miles) earlier this month and his pack (base weight) is nearly double mine. Typically each day I would hike my pace and then snooze for literally two or three hours waiting for him to catch up. For trips where I cook, I'm very happy with my puny alcohol stove setup.

10-K
08-29-2012, 11:51
Esbit is king for me.... Esbit, gram cracker stove, and caldera cone.

Shawnson
08-29-2012, 12:10
has anyone ever used a sierra zip stove on the AT?

russb
08-29-2012, 19:25
Anyone have some real world experience with alcohol stoves in adverse weather to share?

negative 22* F in the Adirondacks, zelph fancee feest stove worked like a champ.

NB: not all alcohol stoves would be so easy to use (if at all) at this temp.

10-K
08-29-2012, 19:34
Just read the review that the OP linked to...

It is very (very very) apparent that they have no experience with esbit and didn't try to get any.

FarmerChef
08-30-2012, 16:00
I've used my penny stove (Mark Jurey) in driving rain and it worked like a champ. I carry a piece of aluminum foil folded up in the pot just in case I need a bigger windscreen or other uses. When the wind is really strong, I just unfold it and wrap it around the pot and stove. Plus, if it's really cold, it reflects heat back into the can to bring the fuel to a boil faster.

Another Kevin
08-30-2012, 16:57
negative 22* F in the Adirondacks, zelph fancee feest stove worked like a champ.

NB: not all alcohol stoves would be so easy to use (if at all) at this temp.

Gadzooks! Hiking in the 'Dacks at those temperatures, you must be getting your water by melting snow. How are you lugging around enough alcohol for that? Winter in this part of the world is what white gas stoves are for. (I wouldn't put up with one in less severe conditions.)

Another Kevin
08-30-2012, 17:09
I've used my penny stove (Mark Jurey) in driving rain and it worked like a champ. I carry a piece of aluminum foil folded up in the pot just in case I need a bigger windscreen or other uses. When the wind is really strong, I just unfold it and wrap it around the pot and stove. Plus, if it's really cold, it reflects heat back into the can to bring the fuel to a boil faster.

I've certainly used a Penny Stove in 20 F and squalls of sleet, and had it burn just fine. I use a windscreen made of an aluminum foil cookie sheet, and I use a priming dish in freezing temps; it's a bit cantankerous to get it to prime otherwise. It's reasonably efficient even at those temperatures: I brought 8 oz of fuel, and it did porridge and coffee in the mornings and hot meals at night for 2 people on a 3-day weekend, with enough fuel left over for afternoon tea on the last day.

Yeah, I know, only a clueless weekender would do that much cooking on the trail. But if I can't have coffee I'm Not Going.

russb
08-30-2012, 21:42
Gadzooks! Hiking in the 'Dacks at those temperatures, you must be getting your water by melting snow. How are you lugging around enough alcohol for that? Winter in this part of the world is what white gas stoves are for. (I wouldn't put up with one in less severe conditions.)

Yep to the melting snow. The amount of alcohol needed for a few days isn't that much even in those conditions. Interesting you mention white gas. Once while hiking the Dix range in winter, my partner's white gas stove crapped out so he had to bum hot water from my trusty alky stove. My stove and fuel was less than his white gas kit for that 3 day trip.