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Kerosene
05-05-2005, 10:53
I will be doing a section hike from Catawba south to Atkins, Virginia the week after Memorial Day (average low temp. in Bland for late May is 48F, with a record low of 31F). I'd like to bring my Hennessy UL Asym Backpacker, and I'd like opinions on the Hennessy Undercover and Underpad, as well as any other suggestions for keeping comfortable.

The silnyl undercover/open-cell pad adds 13 ounces to the setup, but seems like it would be much more convenient than the 6-oz 1/4" Oware pad I've used which gets scrunched up underneath you at night and gets wet. It sounds like the Underpad fits into the undercover, won't move around very easily, and sufficiently wraps the sleeper to avoid cold spots, correct? I love the hammock comfort and flexibility when it's warm out, but I'm a light sleeper and easily awake if my knee or butt isn't sufficient insulated when it's below 60F.

I was thinking of bringing my 35-degree bag for this trip instead of my 20-degree bag. Do you think I can use it as an overquilt or will my back get uncomfortable?

The Hennessy website says that they're developing a cheap tensioning/water collection device, but they won't be available until June. Do I really need drip lines if I leave the snakeskins on?

I'm not ready to go to a full underquilt at this time, and it doesn't seem like it should get cold enough on this trip to merit one.

Youngblood
05-05-2005, 11:47
... as well as any other suggestions for keeping comfortable. ...
There is a new product that most people probably aren't aware of yet that might interest you. I am involved in this product so I speak with that bias. Anyway, Ed Speer is currently making and selling a Segmented Pad Extender that's primary purpose is for hammock use and may allow you to use stuff you already have for your primary insulation. It can be seen on this link, which also has a little testimonal from me: http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm .

Youngblood

rpettit
05-05-2005, 12:25
I purchased the HH undercover/underpad portion of the SuperShelter system and, after back yard testing, found that the underpad provided inadequate insulation. I added a space blanket, as HH recommends, and found that it made no difference at all. The system might provide enough insulation to keep me warm at 60^.

rpettit
05-05-2005, 12:29
On a positive note, I still use the undercover, but with different insulation. I use a piece of 1.25 thick open cell foam pad cut to the same dimensions as the HH underpad . I found that this set-up, with a 20^ down bag used as a quilt, keeps me warm to 40^. I use a length blue closed-cell foam pad inside the hammock for temps below 40^, I have been down to 35^ with the addition of the closed-cell foam pad and was warm. You only need enough closed-cell foam padding to insulate your butt and back. I found that by reducing the length of the closed-cell foam pad, it eliminated most of the buckling that is commonly associated with using closed cell foam pads inside the hammock. I have never experienced any condensation issues between the hammock and undercover, or with the open-cell foam pad. This is a very warm, comfortable, moderately inexpensive system.

trippclark
05-05-2005, 15:05
From my experience, the Speer Hammock with down Peapod and down top blanket, or a Hennessy Hammock with JRB Nest underquilt and down top blanket, would be comfortable at the temperatures you can expect, especially if you dress warmly when sleeping. I have used both of these systems on the AT with temps in the 30's and 40's with success.

I have not tried the HH Supershelter cold weather system.

austinwilcox
06-03-2005, 18:29
Ive been camping year round (sub freezing temps) in a hammock for years. I have a Big Agnes bag (Storm King) with a .5 in inflatable pad. My hammock is one I made myself starting from a Marine two man camping hammock ($35) stripped off everything but the mesh and rings, re strung it with climbing rope and built colapsable alluminum poles acting as stays like in a big yard hammock. It doesnt wrap around you like a normal nylon bag hammock thanks to the stays and therefore only contacts you under your pad which is insulated. Other hammocks colaps your insulation because they wrap all around you but my style feels more like a cot because I pull it very tight. With this combination, I stay warm and much more comfortable than the nylon bag hammocks (hennessy) etc. Becaus I pull it tight, I can also sleep on my side but thats a more advanced move that I wouldnt try right off the bat.


I will be doing a section hike from Catawba south to Atkins, Virginia the week after Memorial Day (average low temp. in Bland for late May is 48F, with a record low of 31F). I'd like to bring my Hennessy UL Asym Backpacker, and I'd like opinions on the Hennessy Undercover and Underpad, as well as any other suggestions for keeping comfortable.

The silnyl undercover/open-cell pad adds 13 ounces to the setup, but seems like it would be much more convenient than the 6-oz 1/4" Oware pad I've used which gets scrunched up underneath you at night and gets wet. It sounds like the Underpad fits into the undercover, won't move around very easily, and sufficiently wraps the sleeper to avoid cold spots, correct? I love the hammock comfort and flexibility when it's warm out, but I'm a light sleeper and easily awake if my knee or butt isn't sufficient insulated when it's below 60F.

I was thinking of bringing my 35-degree bag for this trip instead of my 20-degree bag. Do you think I can use it as an overquilt or will my back get uncomfortable?

The Hennessy website says that they're developing a cheap tensioning/water collection device, but they won't be available until June. Do I really need drip lines if I leave the snakeskins on?

I'm not ready to go to a full underquilt at this time, and it doesn't seem like it should get cold enough on this trip to merit one.

neo
06-03-2005, 19:18
this is what i will be using:cool: neo
http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm

Big Dawg
08-28-2005, 12:14
Any new reports on the HH 4-season undercover/underpad? Based on reports above, the underpad doesn't give enough insulation. Anyone out there had success w/ the undercover/underpad? If this system is for 4-seasons,, seems like it should keep you warm to 20/30 degrees. Rpettit advised above that this HH system only worked down to 60 degrees. That sounds like a 2-season option. Does HH know that this new developed product doesn't work? I would assume they tested this system before selling, & wonder what they're basing their results on?? Any new info would be appreciated.

UCONNMike
08-28-2005, 15:08
RITBlake and I have been freezing in our hennessy hammocks any nite that it has been cold...in Maine we barley survived on some nites and now that it is getting colder, we are again freezing as we make our way into MD....we dont have the 130+ dollars to spend on the hennessey undercover/under-whatever system and we dont wanna carry that crazy pad extender thing that a few of you have suggested, besides getting a -20 degree bag what else can we do so we dont freeze in side our hammocks, cause right now its like sleeping in a meat locker.
peace

rpettit
08-28-2005, 15:11
http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Shelters/Hammocks/Hennessy%20Super%20Shelter/Manufacturer%20Comment/

MedicineMan
08-29-2005, 01:37
I think for people who already have pads your system (well your's and Ed's) looks good and def. has passed the cold tests. I do believe that Sgt Rock was doing this several years ago when we all were exploroing ways to get to lower temps, Sgt correct me if I'm wrong.
RITBlake, you may consider Youngblood's system since you probably already have a thermarest of a blue pad to use, or consider what another poster has done and that's make an underquilt from a cheapo synthetic bag.

Youngblood
08-29-2005, 08:14
I think for people who already have pads your system (well your's and Ed's) looks good and def. has passed the cold tests. I do believe that Sgt Rock was doing this several years ago when we all were exploroing ways to get to lower temps, Sgt correct me if I'm wrong.
RITBlake, you may consider Youngblood's system since you probably already have a thermarest of a blue pad to use, or consider what another poster has done and that's make an underquilt from a cheapo synthetic bag.
Yeah... and Shane was using a system where he wrapped multiple pads in a Neat Sheet and secured them with safety pins while others where using the two-layer hammock approach, etc. There are a lot of ways to make it work and you probably have a sizable percentage of them in your gear room. I don't know what UCONNMike or RITBlake currently are using in terms of bottom side insulation but UCONNMike was understandably frustrated when he made the above post. Cost was expressed as an issue, they are young and doing a sobo thru hike, maybe if we new what they had to work with we could offer better advise or help. (The experience of another recent poster reminded me that not all thermarest are the same in terms of thermal insulation and all closed cell pads aren't either. The bottom side insulation needs to be enough to accomodate the temperatures you will be in or you will still freeze on the bottom side.)

Youngblood

trippclark
08-29-2005, 12:15
RITBlake and I have been freezing in our hennessy hammocks any nite that it has been cold...in Maine we barley survived on some nites and now that it is getting colder, we are again freezing as we make our way into MD....we dont have the 130+ dollars to spend on the hennessey undercover/under-whatever system and we dont wanna carry that crazy pad extender thing that a few of you have suggested, besides getting a -20 degree bag what else can we do so we dont freeze in side our hammocks, cause right now its like sleeping in a meat locker.
peace

Mike and Blake,

I've been following your southbound trip on the web. Sounds like y'all are having a great time traveling as 'Joe's Hole Posse'. Sounds like money is tight, but it is hard to put a price on sleep and comfort. If there is any way possible, I'd encourage y'all to get JRB Nests. An underquilt (or Peapod with Speer hammock) makes a HUGE difference. Yes, it is a significant expense, but with care will last many years. If you can't go that route, reconsider the SPE for a lower cost solution. There is no sense freezing when better options are available. Best of luck! Enjoy the rest of your hike.

Tripp

Just Jeff
08-29-2005, 16:13
Also check out Sgt Rock's Wing Pad and Risk's Overlap Pad. Same thing as the SPE, really...provides insulation around the user's shoulders using CCF pads.

rpettit, I don't recall seeing anything about the additional pads in Hennessy's first descriptions on the website. Actually, the first mention I heard of them was the comment you linked to where he said they were inadvertently left out of the shipments. I still didn't see it on his website when you posted that link. Do you have any further details on the test and these additional pads?

Patrick
08-29-2005, 16:54
What's the sweat condensation factor using the Hennessy system? It's all silnylon, right? Seems like you'd get wet. Also, Hennessy says they use open cell foam and someone else mentioned using it as well. Doesn't open cell hold water in? What are its advantages?

rpettit
08-29-2005, 17:22
Also check out Sgt Rock's Wing Pad and Risk's Overlap Pad. Same thing as the SPE, really...provides insulation around the user's shoulders using CCF pads.

rpettit, I don't recall seeing anything about the additional pads in Hennessy's first descriptions on the website. Actually, the first mention I heard of them was the comment you linked to where he said they were inadvertently left out of the shipments. I still didn't see it on his website when you posted that link. Do you have any further details on the test and these additional pads?
The only details that I have are what is stated on the gear testing site.

rpettit
08-29-2005, 17:41
What's the sweat condensation factor using the Hennessy system? It's all silnylon, right? Seems like you'd get wet. Also, Hennessy says they use open cell foam and someone else mentioned using it as well. Doesn't open cell hold water in? What are its advantages?
I only use the Supershelter undercover. The HH open cell foam pad is useless, it is only 1/4" thick, it occupies some space in my closet. I replaced it with some open cell foam bedding from Wal-mart. It is 1.5" thick, I cut it to the about same dimensions as the HH under pad, maybe a little wider, so that I can sleep comfortably in any postion without cold spots on the sides. I have never experienced any condensation issues with the undercover. Yes, open cell foam would hold water if it got wet,(so would a down or sythetic underquilt), it is relatively heavy and bulky compared to a down underquilt. Probably the same weight and bulk as a sythetic underquilt of similiar dimensions. It only cost $15.
Undercover $100 + open cell foam $15= $115.

Just Jeff
08-30-2005, 01:47
rpettit,

Did you have to alter your bed pad to fit the HH without buckling? I remember discussions about the HH pad being "custom fit" like it had some 3D shaping or something, but I haven't ever seen one. Did you just cut the shape and stick it in the undercover?

Seems like your bed pad is a great way to increase the temp range of the SuperShelter. Do you have pics? About how small can you compress it to pack up?

MedicineMan
08-30-2005, 02:24
Look at Garlington's bag-o-feathers....the army used to make down sleeping bags that were basically duck feathers, not quite as good as down but still very very warm and very lightweight, the cost is good too......
all you have to do is literally fill a bag of feathers, in this case a bag shaped like a football to accomodate the HH shape, baffles would be good but not a have to thing....sew up a football shaped piece of ripstop, dump in the feathers, sew it shut and sew on some attachment points.....better than nothing.
Agreed if you can get the JRB you are a buying heirlooms in terms of quality and function.

rpettit
08-30-2005, 10:13
Yes, I had to cut some slits in the pad to prevent it from buckling.The open cell foam compresses to the same dimensions of a 40-degree synthetic mummy bag. Ill try post a picture later.

UCONNMike
09-01-2005, 09:20
Hey Gang,
I have a 3/4 length ridge rest as my bottom layer for use in my hammock. I pretty much try and huddle myself on the tiny pad so no part of my body touches the icey cold nylon of the hammock. RITBlake and I are in DC right now and ca get to an oulfitter very easily, so any ideas are appreaciated. Thanks guys.

RITBlake
09-01-2005, 10:04
Just wanted to say that, besides the cold factor, Mike and I LOVE our hammocks. They are so comfortable and we get our best sleep inside them.

Mike has a foam pad (as he said) and I have a 3/4 thermarest prolite pad. Hope you guys can help us!

Just Jeff
09-01-2005, 12:06
any ideas are appreaciated.
Take your pick:
http://www.geocities.com/jwj32542/HammockCampingWarm.html

Youngblood
09-01-2005, 18:17
A 3/4 length ProLite 3 and a 3/4 length RidgeRest... that is not much in a hammock once the temperatures go south of 40 to 50 degrees. How cold do you feel you need to be prepared for?

My estimates for pads are on a chart near the bottom of this link to Speer Hammocks web site: http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm . The RidgeRest is a very comfortable closed cell foam pad to sleep on for closed cell foam and has good insulating capabilities but it wasn't designed to lay on a breathable hammock fabric... that may be giving you some trouble, especially in wind where the air currents may flush the warmed trapped air right out of the bottom side indentations of the pad. If you stack pads put the RidgeRest on the top of the stack and it will work fine while providing the most comfortable arrangement.

One trick that Rick (aka FlyFisher) shared that might help with your 3/4 length pads is to put a small piece of closed cell foam pad inside the foot pocket of your sleeping pad and position your feet on it. A small piece of foam (or some other insulation) placed like that can help a lot if your feet are getting cold against the bottom of the hammock.

Shane wraps pads in a sheet of solid fabric and uses safety pins to hold it together ( http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/hiking/sections/gear/shelter/hhvid02.htm ). That will work as well.

Youngblood