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newhampshire camper
05-27-2005, 09:28
Has anyone had any experience with the Trailstove from Status? I was thinking of bringing this with me on my future thru-hike....any comments anyone? The site is www.trailstove.com (http://www.trailstove.com)

neo
05-27-2005, 10:06
i have never used that stove,i do have a seirra zip wood burning stove,it works almost the same way,zip stove has a battery powered fan,the stove you are talking about has a blow tube,you blow air through to get a draft,i would prefer zip stove,no blowing,rather have a battery powered fan:cool: neo

newhampshire camper
05-27-2005, 20:47
i have never used that stove,i do have a seirra zip wood burning stove,it works almost the same way,zip stove has a battery powered fan,the stove you are talking about has a blow tube,you blow air through to get a draft,i would prefer zip stove,no blowing,rather have a battery powered fan:cool: neo
What is the weight of the zip stove that you use, is it comperable to the trailstove?:dance

mrc237
06-01-2005, 10:27
Zip Stoves Go About 1 Lb They Create Alot Of Smoke And Shelter Cooking Is Not Advised I Have Not Used A Ts However But Blowing Thru A Tube Does Not Sound Like Something I'd Be Interested In. I Recently Recieved A Jetboil Stove. Any Feedback?

SGT Rock
06-01-2005, 11:20
I've built a 3.2 ounce wood stove but found that the blow tube method was not the optimal solution. I've been looking at a couple of ideas for a better air feed system.

TDale
06-01-2005, 12:52
What about no air feed?

http://www.garlington.biz/Ray/WoodGasStove/

SGT Rock
06-01-2005, 13:20
I think no air feed is actually a good option if you design a stove to have good air flow - but then you basically have a hobo stove. There are lots of plans out there like the Nimblewill Nomad stove.

newhampshire camper
06-01-2005, 22:23
I've built a 3.2 ounce wood stove but found that the blow tube method was not the optimal solution. I've been looking at a couple of ideas for a better air feed system.
Do you find that you have to blow constantly to keep the flame hot enough to cook with? Why do you say that it is not an optimal solution?

SGT Rock
06-01-2005, 22:37
I found that it required a lot of attention if you want to get the fire hot and keep it hot. The design I came up with didn't let air flow as well as that WoodGas design because I was trying to make it a multiple fuel system, so the chamber was a bit smaller for the wood to burn in - this meant that to keep a fire rolling well you couldn't just throw in some wood and light it. The amount of wood you could get in at one time was not great enough. I could re-design it so that the pot sat on top and you could get more wood in. The other option with mine though was to use it as a box inside a camp fire since the Titanium could hold up - then you would just leave the bottom plate off. See, what I have found when trying to cook on a camp fire the worst part is trying to get a good spot in the fire for cooking without dumping the pot and also having it so you can still get at it too cook.

SunnyWalker
05-29-2007, 02:53
I have a STS and it is great. Follow the directions, it helps. (Place on flat ground, large hole downwind, lightly pack small wood in tube, fill half full, light combustible material underneath through the hole. It will light, wait, blow through tube, wait a few minutes. Its great. I have never had to blow and blow and blow and blow . . . . -SunnyWalker

Two Speed
05-29-2007, 06:29
I have a STS and it is great. . . I've got one, and I'm not all that impressed. My major complaint is packing it. How do you carry yours?

FWIW, the Nimblewell Nomad design looks easier to live with. I use a Westwind stand for my Trangia and have come to like folding style stoves.

SunnyWalker
06-01-2007, 22:48
Well carrying it is more difficult. I just put my Whisperlite inside my pot. Now I usually put it on top of the load (amybe that is why I have a large pack?? Anyway, it seems to do fine. I don't like to tie things on the outside of the pack as they seem to swing around and etc. -SunnyWalker

SunnyWalker
07-25-2007, 17:00
Since I wrote this last post I have switched to a solid fuel stove. The "pellets" one can buy ahead of time and ship ahead to POs. Or one can carry enough for short trips as they were very light. The stove is called an "Esbitt Stove". Worked well and I avoided alcohol leakage as I had no alcohol to carry.
-SunnyWalker

JAK
07-26-2007, 10:33
It seems the old hobbo stove concept is hard to beat. That Garlington stove posted by TDale appears to be a very compact and practical variation on the theme. SgtRocks point about care and attention is noteworthy, as the best fuel is not always available. Sometimes it helps to bring some left over coals from the last fire for the next fire. I would also like to see if the Garlington hobbo stove might work better and be lighter, and perhaps more packable, if it was made of ceramic wool and muffler tape. Hard to beat the hobbo stove though. That Garlington hobbo stove provides a good benchmark to start from. Probably not a bad place to end up either.

zelph
07-26-2007, 11:04
Sometimes it helps to bring some left over coals from the last fire for the next fire. I would also like to see if the Garlington hobbo stove might work better and be lighter, and perhaps more packable, if it was made of ceramic wool and muffler tape. .

Left over coals are useless for starting fires. I've used a propane torch to try and ignite a leftover piece of charcoal and could not get it to ignite. I had heard on many occacions that the coals were to be used to start your next fire. I could not get the piece of charcoal to burn using the propane torch. I bilieve the use of charcoal to start your next fire comes in the rhelm of "Urban Legend". I challenge many of you to do the same test and give your results.

JAK, can you show us a photo of your latest hobo stove that incorporates the ceramic wool and muffler tape. I know you've been working on one or two. It's an interesting concept, would like an update on your progress if you would please. Maybe start a new thread :-? and give some details.

.

Rainman
07-27-2007, 07:46
Check out this stove offered on BPL.com. I have never used it but it looks interesting. http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/bushbuddy_ultra_wood_stove.html

If Ryan Jordan says it works it would definitely be worth a look.

zelph
07-27-2007, 09:38
Check out this stove offered on BPL.com. I have never used it but it looks interesting. http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/bushbuddy_ultra_wood_stove.html

If Ryan Jordan says it works it would definitely be worth a look.

I watched the video at your link, could'nt believe that someone would put a wood burning stove into their cook pot. something wrong with that picture.

JAK
07-27-2007, 09:40
Left over coals are useless for starting fires. I've used a propane torch to try and ignite a leftover piece of charcoal and could not get it to ignite. I had heard on many occacions that the coals were to be used to start your next fire. I could not get the piece of charcoal to burn using the propane torch. I bilieve the use of charcoal to start your next fire comes in the rhelm of "Urban Legend". I challenge many of you to do the same test and give your results.

JAK, can you show us a photo of your latest hobo stove that incorporates the ceramic wool and muffler tape. I know you've been working on one or two. It's an interesting concept, would like an update on your progress if you would please. Maybe start a new thread :-? and give some details.

.I know what you mean. Perhaps the tricky thing with the old coals is keeping them dry. The other thing would be getting them hot enough to burn on their own. I suppose you could drop some oil on them, but then your pretty much back to where you started. LOL. Maybe the stuff most worth keeping is the half burned stuff, not the coals, as long as its not too much and it fits in the stove or fire kit. Anyhow, I will work on the stove and then maybe open a thread. Might have to get feedback from Hiking HQ first though. I'll try and keep my posts down until I build a damn stove. I'm supposed to be finishing my darn thesis. Don't ask. Boring. And by boring don't mean hard to understand. I thinl I may have actually mastered simple and boring simultaneously. It's even related to wind energy. It hasn't been easy mind you. It's taken me the better part of 5 years to make wind energy totally unappealing. I'm just about there.

Rainman
07-28-2007, 09:14
I watched the video at your link, couldn't believe that someone would put a wood burning stove into their cook pot. something wrong with that picture.

It's not my stove. Like I said, I have never used it and have never seen it in person. I just said it was worth consideration for someone who is in the market for a wood burning stove. Personally, I would never consider a wood burning stove.

Let's see, when do I most want a hot meal or warm drink; when it is cold and wet. Let's see, when is it hardest to get wood to burn; when it is cold and wet. Sure, I could do it. But why would I want to spend 30 minutes to an hour getting my stove hot if I don't have to.

I will stick to my JetBoil for short sections (single fuel canister distance of 5-7 days) and my alcohol/esbit stove for longer hikes.

But, if a person's preference is for a wood burning stove . . . OK the horse is dead.

JAK
07-28-2007, 11:49
Let's see, when do I most want a hot meal or warm drink; when it is cold and wet. Let's see, when is it hardest to get wood to burn; when it is cold and wet. Sure, I could do it. But why would I want to spend 30 minutes to an hour getting my stove hot if I don't have to.I here you, but I am just the opposite. I enjoy the pleasant challenge of a wood burning stove most when it is cold and wet and windy. With practice, difficult challenges are not so difficult as you might think. Something like the Kelly Kettle or a well designed Hobbo Stove makes it easier. Also depends on where you hike of course. Here in New Brunswick with have loads of Birch Trees and Spruce Trees. You don't even need a knife nonetheless a hatchet. With my Kelly Kettle I can have boiling hot water within 10 minutes of stopping for tea. Unlimited supply of boiling hot water. Think about that. Hot water. It's not just for cooking anymore. Of course if I was running a race I might make different choices, but for myself in this neck of the woods a small wood fire is natural and eco-friendly and part of the pleasure of being out there. It fits in with all my other choices, like wearing no-name wool, cheap light nylon, and avoiding brand names. OK, Kelly Kettle is a brand name, but its really cool.

Madmax
07-28-2007, 19:19
Here's my little wood, fuel (and more) burner :)

ImkerVS
07-29-2007, 17:28
I bought a TrailStove. I took it on an overnight hike. Didn't like it. Took too much time to get it going. It did one thing for me. It made me really appreciate a Pepsi can stove.

zelph
07-29-2007, 23:10
This thread makes me think of the Martha Stixx hobo stove (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?t=20680&highlight=martha+stuart). Cheap and will last forever.

Easy to make, and light weight. I know of someone that's in the process of making one. Makes me feel good to know that my threads are being used.

sirbingo
07-30-2007, 09:23
I use a Sierra Zip....Not the lightest stove...not the cleanest stove...but I love it. :D

Its the only stove I use now. Works like a charm even when the weather has been rainy all day. The trick is keeping a little dry kindling in your pocket. Once the fire is going within the zip, you can add damp wood and it will burn with no problem...well, Its way smokier though with wet wood. :o

I will be posting a detailed review soon. :)

gold bond
07-30-2007, 09:58
Stupid question...why would you want or prefer a wood burning sove over a alcahol stove? I do not see a weight issue. Fuel is readily available most everywhere.

Not judging just asking. I am a proclaimed gear head and do not have a wood burning stove so......

JAK
07-30-2007, 10:12
Good wood stoves, like a Kelly Kettle or a small and well built Hobbo Stove, when used in a region where easy fuel is available, such as New Brunswick, provide a feeling of greater independance, and an unlimited supply of hot water for such things as washing, laundry, dishes, in addition to cooking and hot drinks. Plus for some people they are more fun, which is the main issue. Not really a weight issue, either way. Kelly Kettle has some issue in winter, as it it not great for melting snow.

Johnny Swank
07-30-2007, 10:17
I've gone through a half-dozen woodburners to try and find the magic bullet and finally ended up where I started - a quick tripod with a pot hanging underneath by a cord. Simple, easy, and the only weight involved is a 5' lenght of triptease to put it together.

We cook about 1/2 our meals on fire, and take alcohol as a backup. Cooking on wood opens up all kinds of food options that aren't all that practical when using an alcohol stove because of the longer simmering times - REAL rice, beans, and that sort of thing. I wouldn't want to have to build a fire every single time I wanted some ramen, but damn if it isn't a nice way to chill out and eat 75% of the time.

The problem with any of these smaller wood stoves is the constant feeding necessary, or the need for a fan/forced air in most designs. Of all these things, the Nimbilwill stove probably comes closest to what I'd actually use if I thru-hiked again. Toss in a soda can bottom for an alky backup to put in the stove when you're feeling lazy, and you'd be set. I'd carry 4-6oz of rubbing alcohol (burns crappy, but it's just for a backup) and toss the hand santizer to make up for the weight. You could also use a few drops as a firestarter on wet days.

JAK
07-30-2007, 11:03
I haven't ever tried a tripod setup, but I've thought about it alot. I can see it for larger groups, but also when solo for drying clothes etc. Also, some wood stove and lantern stove ideas I've thought about are rather tall and skinny and so I've often thought a hanging stove might be the way to go. Endless possibilities. Sometimes messing about with adhoc stove setups is a nice way to fill in the time. Olive oil is another good thing to bring along as both backup food and backup fuel. I have never made a good stove yet that burns olive oil or canola oil, but it's pretty easy to make a good lantern out of anything.

JAK
07-30-2007, 11:06
I meant to say lamp, not lantern. I suppose what makes wax and vegetable oil not so good for stoves is what makes it good for candles and lamps. It burns slow.

zelph
07-30-2007, 15:08
I haven't ever tried a tripod setup, but I've thought about it alot. I can see it for larger groups, but also when solo for drying clothes etc. Also, some wood stove and lantern stove ideas I've thought about are rather tall and skinny and so I've often thought a hanging stove might be the way to go. Endless possibilities. Sometimes messing about with adhoc stove setups is a nice way to fill in the time. Olive oil is another good thing to bring along as both backup food and backup fuel. I have never made a good stove yet that burns olive oil or canola oil, but it's pretty easy to make a good lantern out of anything.

Olive oil!!!! good fuel. The Vegetarian Stove, hav'nt done anything with it recently, maybe in the fall:)


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/vegiestove005.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/vegiestove004.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v228/obijiwa/vegiestove.jpg


.

JAK
07-30-2007, 15:30
Beauty wick stoves. Best I've ever seen.

Canola oil is a great fuel also, its even better than light extra virgin olive oil and much cheaper, though not as good for eating, and it doesn't have the wonderful ancient traditional of olive oil, or whale blubber for that matter.

SunnyWalker
08-05-2007, 21:14
I tried this on the AT this July. But I used my STS as a alcohol stove each night and morning. Know why? Cuz I was to exhausted to do otherwise. The thought of gathering wood chips, etc., lighting it, blowing etc., was too much for me after hiking all day AND the thought of putting out the fire. That was a main concern. Not so much at night, but in the morning? I don't see how anyone could put out their fire good enough. MOST campers I saw using fire (I saw three groups), left smoldering fires in fire rings. Sure they had dumped water on them and stirred the remains. But I felt that was dangerous. Am I wrong, over cautious? Well, anyway I switched to an Esbitt stove and it is much lighter anyway, and I thought the STS was light. That is what I experienced. I sent the STS home and might use it sometime, I guess. It is a romantic idea, to sit around a fire. I miss it. Thanks. -SunnyWalker

zelph
08-07-2007, 14:06
Good wood stoves, like a Kelly Kettle or a small and well built Hobbo Stove, when used in a region where easy fuel is available, such as New Brunswick, provide a feeling of greater independance, and an unlimited supply of hot water for such things as washing, laundry, dishes, in addition to cooking and hot drinks. Plus for some people they are more fun, which is the main issue. Not really a weight issue, either way. Kelly Kettle has some issue in winter, as it it not great for melting snow.

I came across some interest information regarding the use of the Kelly Kettle at this site in the UK. Same information can be applied to the Trail Stove
PowerSwitch
The UK's Peak Oil Discussion Forum (http://www.powerswitch.org.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4755)

Lanthar Mandragoran
08-07-2007, 14:27
Beauty wick stoves. Best I've ever seen.

Canola oil is a great fuel also, its even better than light extra virgin olive oil and much cheaper, though not as good for eating, and it doesn't have the wonderful ancient traditional of olive oil, or whale blubber for that matter.

Or... Candlefish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eulachon)?


The name "candlefish" derives from the fact that it is so fat during spawning, with up to 15% of total body weight in fat, that if caught, dried, and strung on a wick, it can be burned as a candle.

zelph
08-07-2007, 20:28
Or... Candlefish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eulachon)?

Interesting fish. The fresh water smelt in Lake Michigan are one of my favorite fish, yummy. A cousin to the candlefish.

How are you doing on your oil stove?

You were toying with one right? I forget so easily:o

SunnyWalker
06-06-2008, 22:27
I guess I can't lay the Stratus Trailstove down. I watched the video on Ytube. Looks easy and good. So I think I will try it again. I hate the idea of spending money on now, lets see . . . propane stove, MSR stove, Esbit stove, Stratus stove . . . and buy another??!? I am going to try to make it with one of these. I think of either Esbit or Stratus. How about Esbit tabs for when i need them and Stratus stove?

take-a-knee
06-06-2008, 22:30
If you want to burn wood, get a Bushbuddy, cause there is nothing better.

SunnyWalker
06-07-2008, 14:18
I looked the bushbuddy up, it looks kind of dinky.

take-a-knee
06-07-2008, 14:45
I looked the bushbuddy up, it looks kind of dinky.

Well, if by dinky you mean light, at 5oz it is that, and it is designed to be carried in a Snow Peak 900 pot to keep it from getting battered. It won't boil as fast as a Jetboil, and you have to constantly tend it like any other small stove, but it will boil a pint with literally a handfull of twigs.

Rainman
06-09-2008, 13:42
. . . but it will boil a pint with literally a handful of twigs.

I like to drink my pints cold :banana

Bob S
06-09-2008, 17:15
A forced air stove like the WoodGas (or a homemade one) is hard to beatas far as wood stoves go. It really puts out the BTUís, and itís amazingly low as to how much soot you get on your pans. Wood stoves require more planning and attention while cooking, but I like them. Alcohol is also nice with much less involvement, but I like both.

SunnyWalker
06-26-2008, 21:26
Well, that is quite a recommend. I might try the bushbuddy!