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catkonosky
01-04-2013, 12:01
This is basically my list. I am debating on getting the spot GP, however, it's expensive. This is for a thru-hike and I'm hiking with my boyfriend so alot of these things will be split among our packs. (except for our clothing)... I have way too many things! Help! Also when I calculated the approximate cost of everything I still needed (which is a lot, since my old gear needs to be replaced) it came out to over $500.00!
Clothing
1 long sleeve shirts
3 short sleeve shirts
1 fleece jacket
Beanie
Gloves
Hiking socks
Boots
Rain suit or poncho
2 pairs of shorts
1 pair of pants
1 pair of long johns
Bathing suit
Sunglasses
hat

Sleep system
Tent
sleeping bag/double bag
camp pillow
Sleeping pad

Toiletries
Comb
Toothpaste drops
Toothbrush
peppermint soap
Small towel

First aid supplies
Ibuprofen
Tums
Benadryl tablets
Calamine lotion
Gauze
Bandages
Duct tape
Alcohol/peroxide
Vitamins
Bug spray

Cooking supplies
Aluminum pot
camp light cup
spork
Can opener
Bic lighters

Electronics
Cell phone
Cell phone flashlight/charger
headlamp

Food supply
Emergency supply food (mres)
Protein water flavoring




Misc.
2 Internal frame hiking pack
2 pairs of Hiking poles
Knife or hatchet
Collapsible shovel
Water filtration tablets
Emergency blanket
Para cord
Compass
At 2013 trail guide
Extra Nikon battery
Tent repair kit
Camp shower
Flint
4 Water bottles
Bear spray
Food sack
Pill pack w/ spices
Extra batteries
Copies of important documents/identification
Bandanas
Small journal and pen
Nikon d3000
Extra shoe laces

Clothing
1 long sleeve shirts
3 short sleeve shirts
1 fleece jacket
Beanie
Gloves
Hiking socks
Boots
Rain suit or poncho
2 pairs of shorts
1 pair of pants
1 pair of long johns
Bathing suit
Sunglasses
hat

Sleep system
Tent
sleeping bag/double bag
camp pillow
Sleeping pad

Toiletries
Comb
Toothpaste drops
Toothbrush
peppermint soap
Small towel

First aid supplies
Ibuprofen
Tums
Benadryl tablets
Calamine lotion
Gauze
Bandages
Duct tape
Alcohol/peroxide
Vitamins
Bug spray

Cooking supplies
Aluminum pot
camp light cup
spork
Can opener
Bic lighters

Electronics
Cell phone
Cell phone flashlight/charger
headlamp

Food supply
Emergency supply food (mres)
Protein water flavoring




Misc.
2 Internal frame hiking pack
2 pairs of Hiking poles
Knife or hatchet
Collapsible shovel
Water filtration tablets
Emergency blanket
Para cord
Compass
At 2013 trail guide
Extra Nikon battery
Tent repair kit
Camp shower
Flint
4 Water bottles
Bear spray
Food sack
Pill pack w/ spices
Extra batteries
Copies of important documents/identification
Bandanas
Small journal and pen
Nikon d3000
Extra shoe laces

catkonosky
01-04-2013, 12:01
It pasted twice, Sorry!

Tundra
01-04-2013, 12:14
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/webkit-fake-url://EE8B5D5F-DC4C-4E01-B9BB-1972521BBB87/imagejpeg

Tundra
01-04-2013, 12:22
Start here and then reduce first aid, kitchen, sleep system etc. Showers, hatchet, extra shoelaces, flint, collapsible shovel, emergency food supply (mre's) Extra batteries, pillow are all just about silly to carry. You'll be in towns so frequently you can get anything you need. But these things arent needed. Good luck.

catkonosky
01-04-2013, 12:26
I'm actually planning on eating MRE's to save money on food. I've eaten them before so I know that they aren't the best thing in the world, but that was going to be my primary source of food

Omaha_Ace
01-04-2013, 12:27
1) drop one t-shirt and the pillow. Stuff the second t-shirt with other clothes to MAKE a pillow.
2) Alchohol / peroxide is actually not recommended for cuts - it destroys tissue. Just pack a couple of the wipes or multi-purpose a small tube of hand sanitizer
3) Ditch the hatchet, camp shower, shoe laces (you have paracord already...), and I'd even say the bear spray - you'll only have blacks, not grizzlies.

Nutbrown
01-04-2013, 12:34
​First off, $500. is not outrageous at all. I don't understand those that are planning on taking 6 months of their lives on a hiking trip and complain about the cost. Really, if you can't afford it, work another job until the hike. ...and here's my take on a few things...

Clothing
1 long sleeve shirts
3 short sleeve shirts-1 or 2 max
1 fleece jacket
Beanie
Gloves
Hiking socks
Boots
Rain suit or poncho
2 pairs of shorts-send them when the weather gets warmer
1 pair of pants
1 pair of long johns
Bathing suit -just wear your unders and sports bra.
Sunglasses
hat

Sleep system
Tent
sleeping bag/double bag
camp pillow-stuff your jacket with your extra clothes
Sleeping pad

Toiletries
Comb
Toothpaste drops
Toothbrush
peppermint soap
Small towel

First aid supplies
Ibuprofen
Tums
Benadryl tablets
Calamine lotion
Gauze
Bandages
Duct tape
Alcohol/peroxide
Vitamins
Bug spray

Cooking supplies
Aluminum pot
camp light cup
spork
Can opener-there are teeny little ones available, don't bring a kitchen OXO. Better yet, don't bring canned food.
Bic lighters

Electronics
Cell phone
Cell phone flashlight/charger
headlamp

Food supply
Emergency supply food (mres)-just a 4-5 day supply is all you need at one time. aren't the MRE's heavier that dehydrated packs?
Protein water flavoring




Misc.
2 Internal frame hiking pack
2 pairs of Hiking poles
Knife or hatchet-hatchet? you gonna do trail maitenence? A small blade is all you'll need
Collapsible shovel-you can just as easily use your pole to dig a hole.
Water filtration tablets
-Emergency Blanket-why not use your sleeping bag?
Para cord
Compass
At 2013 trail guide
Extra Nikon battery
Tent repair kit
Camp shower-no
Flint -what happened to the lighters?
4 Water bottles-use either a bladder or gatorade bottles
Bear spray-if you insist, but it will be sent home later
Food sack
Pill pack w/ spices
Extra batteries
Copies of important documents/identification
Bandanas
Small journal and pen
Nikon d3000
Extra shoe laces-use duct tape till you get to town

Hosaphone
01-04-2013, 12:39
This is basically my list. I am debating on getting the spot GP, however, it's expensive. This is for a thru-hike and I'm hiking with my boyfriend so alot of these things will be split among our packs. (except for our clothing)... I have way too many things! Help! Also when I calculated the approximate cost of everything I still needed (which is a lot, since my old gear needs to be replaced) it came out to over $500.00!

What else do you still need to purchase?

Your list is kind of a disaster, but you will figure out what you need / don't need very quickly once you get out on the trail.

Something that may help you is to put all your gear into a spreadsheet so you can see what everything weighs. Excel is good, or http://www.geargrams.com/ is very popular.

Nutbrown
01-04-2013, 12:42
Another thing you should consider is what exactly you split between the 2 packs. Always think what would happen if you split up, for any reason. I guarantee that you will not be side by side the entire trip.

mountain squid
01-04-2013, 12:44
NOBO or SOBO? Some observations:

too many t-shirts - at most 2, but can probably get away with just 1
too many shorts
consider zip-off pants which will convert to shorts when necessary
bathing suit probably unnecessary
camp footwear
small towel unnecessary - use bandanas
hand sanitizer
carry only enough first aid supplies to get you to a road
ear plugs
needle for draining blisters
sun screen - no leaves on trees if going NOBO
stove
is that a larger can opener? if your knife is of the swiss army type, it might have a can opener - you probably won't eat much canned food anyway
mre's are heavy and bulky - consider ramen noodles as emergency food instead
collapsible shovel? - is that like the orange trowel?
stuff sacks for everything
consider water reservoir instead of water bottles
consider hydration system for drinking on the go

most likely unnecessary and suggest leaving behind:
hatchet
camp shower
bear spray


Good Luck and Have Fun!

See you on the trail,
mt squid

read some observations (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?14493-observations-from-fs42-(advice-for-first-week-on-trail)&highlight=) thread for additional observations

maintenance videos (http://www.youtube.com/user/mountainsquid04/videos)
how to hike (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?73587-how-to-hike)

Slo-go'en
01-04-2013, 12:46
This is basically my list. I am debating on getting the spot GP, however, it's expensive. This is for a thru-hike and I'm hiking with my boyfriend so alot of these things will be split among our packs. (except for our clothing)... I have way too many things! Help! Also when I calculated the approximate cost of everything I still needed (which is a lot, since my old gear needs to be replaced) it came out to over $500.00!


Only $500 - that's cheap!

Clothing
1 long sleeve shirts
3 short sleeve shirts only need two at most.
1 fleece jacket
Beanie
Gloves
Hiking socks
Boots
Rain suit or poncho Get a rain jacket. Pants are optional, most don't use them.
2 pairs of shorts Get zip off leg pants, maybe one pair of nylon shorts
1 pair of pants
1 pair of long johns
Bathing suit That can be handy on occasion, but I've seen pleanty of woman go swiming with just their sports bra and nylon shorts.
Sunglasses
hat

Sleep system
Tent
sleeping bag/double bag Individual sleeping bags, but you can get ones which zip together when the time is right.
camp pillow No need for pillow, stuff you jacket into a stuff sack.
Sleeping pad

Toiletries
Comb
Toothpaste drops
Toothbrush
peppermint soap
Small towel

First aid supplies
Ibuprofen
Tums
Benadryl tablets
Calamine lotion
Gauze
Bandages
Duct tape
Alcohol/peroxide
Vitamins
Bug spray

Add sunscreen if your hiking before the middle of April.
Cooking supplies
Aluminum pot
camp light cup
spork
Can opener Can opener? Nobody uses food out of a can!
Bic lighters

Stove?

Electronics
Cell phone
Cell phone flashlight/charger
headlamp

Food supply
Emergency supply food (mre’s) Maybe one, but these are heavy and produce a lot of trash.
Protein water flavoring

Misc.
2 Internal frame hiking pack
2 pairs of Hiking poles
Knife or hatchet No need for a hatchet, your not a lumberjack! small folding pocket knife is all you need.
Collapsible shovel No need for a shovel either. If you need to bury your poop, use the heel of your boot to kick a shallow hole on the ground.
Water filtration tablets
Emergency blanket Totally useless
Para cord
Compass
At 2013 trail guide
Extra Nikon battery
Tent repair kit
Camp shower Good luck with that! leave it home.
Flint
4 Water bottles Plastic soda bottles work just fine.
Bear spray Not needed.
Food sack
Pill pack w/ spices
Extra batteries
Copies of important documents/identification All you need is your drivers license or student ID.
Bandanas
Small journal and pen
Nikon d3000
Extra shoe laces Easy enough to get if and when you ever need them. Chances are they will out last the shoes.


There are a bunch of other little odds and ends you probably aren't going to need, but you'll figure that out once your on the trail.

Omaha_Ace
01-04-2013, 12:51
Another thing you should consider is what exactly you split between the 2 packs. Always think what would happen if you split up, for any reason. I guarantee that you will not be side by side the entire trip.

Each pack should have the survial essentials for sure. GREAT point Nutbrown.

I also hope with most of this list that she's trimming what cam be trimmed - like handles from toothbrushes and wrapping 10 feet of duct tape into a small spool rather than the whole roll.

I can also damn near guarantee that the camera and accessories aren't going to make it very far. I've taken people on 4-5 day trips where they lugged a SLR and it was the #1 thing they wish they would have left home.

I'd also say leave the calamine lotion unless you are hyper sensitive to ivy.

Hosaphone
01-04-2013, 13:02
Everyone is saying don't bring a pillow. I disagree - IMO a pillow is very worthwhile. Just don't bring your pillow from home... It should weigh under 7 or 8 ounces if you get a luxurious foam pillow (get the smallest size possible), or ~3oz for an inflatable.

The whole "stuff your extra clothes" thing doesn't work very well, because you want your sleep system to be optimized so that you're wearing all your layers on the coldest night you will encounter. If you are wearing all your layers to stay warm, what do you use for a pillow - your shoe? If your bag overkills the temps you face that's nice, but you could theoretically save a bunch of weight with a lighter bag/quilt.

I find that a dedicated pillow is much more comfortable than wadded up clothes anyways, and a good night's sleep is important.

Out of the 5 backpacking pillows I have tried, I have found this one to be the most comfortable. Only weighs 3oz: http://www.backcountrygear.com/exped-air-pillow.html?gclid=CKK42KaTz7QCFUQw4AodLkoA1A

Old Hiker
01-04-2013, 13:06
This is basically my list. I am debating on getting the spot GP, however, it's expensive. This is for a thru-hike and I'm hiking with my boyfriend so alot of these things will be split among our packs. (except for our clothing)... I have way too many things! Help! Also when I calculated the approximate cost of everything I still needed (which is a lot, since my old gear needs to be replaced) it came out to over $500.00!
Clothing
1 long sleeve shirts
fleece should take care of it
3 short sleeve shirts
2 max
1 fleece jacket
Beanie
Gloves
Hiking socks
Boots
Rain suit or poncho
used my pants more than my jacket, but was glad for the jacket
2 pairs of shorts
1 pair should do
1 pair of pants
I used convertible pants - never took the legs off
1 pair of long johns
Bathing suit
not sure why
Sunglasses
useful at times when facing the sun, esp. in the 1st month or two before the leaves come out
hat

Sleep system
Tent
sleeping bag/double bag
camp pillow
clothing in a stuff sack
Sleeping pad

Toiletries
Comb
Toothpaste drops
Toothbrush
peppermint soap
I used Coleman soap sheets
Small towel
bandana

First aid supplies
Ibuprofen
Yep - I planned 1-2 per day - carried 20 at a time
Tums
I carried and dropped - never needed
Benadryl tablets
never needed
Calamine lotion
poison ivy not out until Apr/May - watch where you set up, watch where you walk, long pants
Gauze
Bandages
Duct tape
Alcohol/peroxide
Germ-x
Vitamins
Didn't carry - tried to eat right in town, plus variety of food on trail
Bug spray
Never needed, even up to 18 may when I had to stop, carried 4 ounces forever, though

Cooking supplies
Aluminum pot
camp light cup
spork
Can opener
I never had any cans to open
Bic lighters

Electronics
Cell phone
Cell phone flashlight/charger
headlamp

Food supply
Emergency supply food (mre’s)
Why not a couiple or 3 of the Coleman packs from Wally - cheaper, lighter, better tasting
Protein water flavoring
???




Misc.
2 Internal frame hiking pack
2 pairs of Hiking poles
Knife or hatchet
Small knife
Collapsible shovel
Trowel, if needed - I liked and used mine
Water filtration tablets
Emergency blanket
Dropped mine
Para cord
use for extra shoelaces, etc.
Compass
I carried one - used infrequently
At 2013 trail guide
Extra Nikon battery
Tent repair kit
Duct tape?
Camp shower
Bandana and stream
Flint
???
4 Water bottles
I carried and used 2
Bear spray
Didn't think it was necessary
Food sack
Pill pack w/ spices
Never used mine - dropped
Extra batteries
I carried 2 extra or so
Copies of important documents/identification
Keep with someone you know who can get to a fax machine if necessary
Bandanas
Oh, yeah - 3 of the larger ones
Small journal and pen
Nikon d3000
Carried small $120 digital + extra 8 gig card
Extra shoe laces
Paracord



I still carried WAY too much gear, esp. food. Good luck - keep an online journal and let us know how it goes!!

catkonosky
01-04-2013, 13:10
Each pack should have the survial essentials for sure. GREAT point Nutbrown.

I also hope with most of this list that she's trimming what cam be trimmed - like handles from toothbrushes and wrapping 10 feet of duct tape into a small spool rather than the whole roll.

I can also damn near guarantee that the camera and accessories aren't going to make it very far. I've taken people on 4-5 day trips where they lugged a SLR and it was the #1 thing they wish they would have left home.

I'd also say leave the calamine lotion unless you are hyper sensitive to ivy.


I do need the calamine lotion, and as far as the slr goes, I know that it's heavy but I'm a photographer and I have to take it with me. I'm open to suggestions for maybe a smaller more compact camera, but from what I've seen they don't come near the image quality that my camera can produce. and yes. the duct tape will be wrapped around my hiking poles. I'm cutting many things off my list, I seem to be really unorganized!

Papa D
01-04-2013, 13:15
You have a ton of "stuff" - get rid of that shovel and hatchet
right away - pare down the first aid and anything extra. Swim
Naked or just in your shorts and bra - ditch shoe laces and consider
Hiking in shoes - no boots - ditch the bear spray, the flint, and
the compass - you won't forget which way you're walking. Pare
down the clothed too / 1 extra shirt is plenty - wear long johns
under shorts or rain pants and skip long pants - that'll get you started
- don't think about what you "might" need - think about what you
don't need - folks pack their fears - best regards D

Omaha_Ace
01-04-2013, 13:18
I do need the calamine lotion, and as far as the slr goes, I know that it's heavy but I'm a photographer and I have to take it with me. I'm open to suggestions for maybe a smaller more compact camera, but from what I've seen they don't come near the image quality that my camera can produce. and yes. the duct tape will be wrapped around my hiking poles. I'm cutting many things off my list, I seem to be really unorganized!

If you're used to hauling it then by all means. With stuff like the calamine if you can reduce it into smaller, lighter containers that should help - in the end it doesn't matter how many items you carry, but how much space they take and what they weigh. After all, that's what lists are for - cutting! I hate leaving things home I'd LIKE to have, but around mile 10 I'm always happier for it. And you're in for a whole load of mile 10's. Best of luck and hope all your trips are happy ones.

Old Hiker
01-04-2013, 13:18
I do need the calamine lotion, and as far as the slr goes, I know that it's heavy but I'm a photographer and I have to take it with me. I'm open to suggestions for maybe a smaller more compact camera, but from what I've seen they don't come near the image quality that my camera can produce. and yes. the duct tape will be wrapped around my hiking poles. I'm cutting many things off my list, I seem to be really unorganized!

Organization comes with practice. Spread it all out after each practice hike (you ARE practicing, right?!?!), see what you didn't use and try again. Make sure you have several multi-day trips as well. I looked for bad weather to set up my tent/hammock in before my thru attempt.

Try for gear with 2 uses as well.

+1 on PapaD above - you pack your fears. I sure did.

catkonosky
01-04-2013, 13:26
What about the Spot GPS? Is it a good or just plain silly investment?

Omaha_Ace
01-04-2013, 13:36
Silly in my opinion, but I know what my survival capabilites are and I don't have to routinely report back to anyone where I am. It seems like an expensive security blanket to me, especially on a trail where there are going to be a lot of other capable hikers and roads / towns on a regular basis.

Papa D
01-04-2013, 13:39
What about the Spot GPS? Is it a good or just plain silly investment?

In my opinion this is a silly investment and constitutes MORE weight in your pack already laden with stuff that (I promise you) will end up in hiker boxes over the first 200 miles if you were to actually pack it.

Yeah - totally skip the spot. People have only started carrying cell phones in the last 10 years or so. I see you have one - you'll get service in about 60% of the places you'll be or be within a mile walk of service.

I know you think we're being hard on you but getting the right stuff, pared down, super organized is what you want to do. Get that first aid kit in a quart zip-lock. If you need extra bandaids there are plenty of stores along the way.

Get your pack weight (total, not base weight) to a MAX of 1/4 your body weight. If you are an 18 year old gal and weigh 110, that's 27.5 pounds including a food bag and water.

You can do it!!!

Tom Murphy
01-04-2013, 13:53
What about the Spot GPS? Is it a good or just plain silly investment?

The SPOT is great for letting your loved ones back home know where you are, and if you were solo, then maybe you might want you for their peace of mind.

But you are going with BF, so why bring it?

My advice: Go hike the Long Trail first.

G-FOURce
01-04-2013, 13:57
Clothing
1 long sleeve shirts -- SYNTHETIC
3 short sleeve shirts -- SYNTHETIC
1 fleece jacket -- HAVE YOU COMPARED WEIGHTS OF A FLEECE VS A JACKET WITH SYNTHETIC INSULATION? I OPTED FOR SYNTHETIC INSULATION
Beanie
Gloves
Hiking socks
Boots
Rain suit or poncho
2 pairs of shorts
1 pair of pants
1 pair of long johns
Bathing suit
Sunglasses
hat

Sleep system
Tent
sleeping bag/double bag -- PERHAPS TWO THAT MATE, BUT NOT JUST ONE DOUBLE
camp pillow -- AGREE, BUT CONSIDER AN INFLATIBLE
Sleeping pad

Toiletries
Comb
Toothpaste drops
Toothbrush
peppermint soap
Small towel -- SEE BANDANA BELOW

First aid supplies
Ibuprofen
Tums
Benadryl tablets
Calamine lotion -- NOT SURE ITS NECESSARY
Gauze
Bandages
Duct tape -- ONLY WHAT YOU NEED. I WOULD PERSONALLY CARRY TENACIOUS TAPE OVER DUCT TAPE
Alcohol/peroxide -- WIPES MAYBE?
Vitamins
Bug spray

Cooking supplies -- DID YOU PURPOSEFULLY OMIT FUEL?
Aluminum pot
camp light cup
spork
Can opener
Bic lighters

Electronics
Cell phone
Cell phone flashlight/charger
headlamp

Food supply
Emergency supply food (mres) -- IF YOU HAVENT EATEN ANY BEFORE, I WOULD SUGGEST YOU TRY A FEW BEFORE YOU INVEST
Protein water flavoring




Misc.
2 Internal frame hiking pack
2 pairs of Hiking poles
Knife or hatchet -- NO HATCHET... SMALL, LIGHT KNIFE
Collapsible shovel -- NOPE. IF YOU'RE DIGGING CAT HOLES, THEN USE A LIGHT TROWEL
Water filtration tablets
Emergency blanket -- NOT SURE THIS IS NECESSARY
Para cord
Compass
At 2013 trail guide -- IF YOU'RE MAILING SUPPLIES, THEN SEND PHOTOCOPIED PAGES BY SECTION ALONG WITH YOUR RESUPPLIES INSTEAD OF CARRYING THE WHOLE BOOK FOR 2.5K MILES
Extra Nikon battery -- I WOULDN'T, BUT HYOH
Tent repair kit -- JUST SOME TENACIOUS TAPE AND A SMALL ALUMINUM POLE SPLINT
Camp shower -- NOPE
Flint -- WHAT ARE THE LIGHTERS FOR?
4 Water bottles
Bear spray -- NOT SURE THIS IS NECESSARY
Food sack
Pill pack w/ spices
Extra batteries
Copies of important documents/identification
Bandanas -- IF YOURE BRINGING BANDANAS DO YOU NEED TOWELS, TOO?
Small journal and pen -- CONSIDER A PENCIL INSTEAD OF A PEN (WONT BREAK AND LEAK, WRITING ABILITY WONT BE INFLUENCED BY TEMPERATURE, YOU CAN SHARPEN IT WITH YOUR SMALL KNIFE)
Nikon d3000 -- I WOULDNT, BUT HYOH
Extra shoe laces -- NOPE

did i miss sunscreen? if not, perhaps you'd want to consider some.

scudder
01-04-2013, 14:23
check out the" cheap gear/how to dirtbag like a professional" piece in the article section of the forum for some useful ideas. Couldn't find it, but there was a thread about purchasing pack, shelter, pad and sleeping bag for under $300 awhile back.

scudder
01-04-2013, 14:47
Thread is called "$300 challenge" started by Sgt Rock-8/22/2004 You should be able to find it if you type the title into the search box- or some more computer literate user will be along to paste in the appropriate link.

Starchild
01-04-2013, 15:50
I noticed you listed a MRE as 'emergency food'. If you mean by that a extra meal over and above what you need to make it to the next resupply, or in other words a meal you don't intend to eat unless things go wrong, for that one I would suggest a freeze dried meal. They are quite a bit lighter for something you intend to be carrying for (if all goes right) 2184 miles.

Blissful
01-04-2013, 17:34
Be sure you have the finances for your hike before you start. Nothing worse than having to get off b/c you have no more money.

WILLIAM HAYES
01-04-2013, 21:50
try to get you pack weight with food and water down to 30-32 lbs-ditch the MRE's redo your clothing list and look at the miscellaneous stuff you are carrying-one rule of thumb that i use is if i dont put my hands on it at least once a day i probably dont need to carry it of course there are a few exceptions i.e first aid kit other hikers have posted their pack list on whiteblaze do a search and compare what you are taking-the tendency for a lot of people is to pack too many clothes revisit you list and good luck on your hike-just a comment on splitting weight with a hiking partner -make sure that you both have agreed upon stopping points for the day that are reasonable based on the slowest hiker-I met a couple on the trail several years ago that had different hiking capabilities which posed big angry problems for them remember it is no fun if you have to hike someone else's hike that makes you miserable
good luck

Papa D
01-04-2013, 21:54
The SPOT is great for letting your loved ones back home know where you are, and if you were solo, then maybe you might want you for their peace of mind.

But you are going with BF, so why bring it?

My advice: Go hike the Long Trail first.

The LT is super nice - they would have fun - hiking north of Middlebury Snow bowl is harder than most of the AT (except parts of NH / S. ME)

Papa D
01-04-2013, 21:56
I noticed you listed a MRE as 'emergency food'. If you mean by that a extra meal over and above what you need to make it to the next resupply, or in other words a meal you don't intend to eat unless things go wrong, for that one I would suggest a freeze dried meal. They are quite a bit lighter for something you intend to be carrying for (if all goes right) 2184 miles.

Yeah - MREs would be completely and totally unnecessary - - just take a regular meal like an extra pasta sides or bag of potatoes for the "extra-meal"

Matjok
01-04-2013, 22:00
I'm open to suggestions for maybe a smaller more compact camera, but from what I've seen they don't come near the image quality that my camera can produce.

Take a look at Canon G12 or G15. Almost as good as an SLR in image quality, functions and ease of use. Weighs less than half of an SLR body with lens.

bigcranky
01-04-2013, 23:05
Camera: what SLR is it? You'll need to think about how you are handling memory cards and batteries. Recharging in town is pretty easy (just be polite and ask before pluggin in at a restaurant or store.) For cards you can either bring enough for the whole hike (several 32GB cards may suffice depending on how much you shoot), or figure out some way to mail them home and get them downloaded from the trail, then mailed back.

(Given your finances there is no reason to buy a new camera, but there are several compact cameras that provide similar image quality to a full size DSLR. They just tend to be expensive.)

You've gotten some great advice on your gear and clothing list. You'll figure out the rest when you get out on the trail. Good luck.

Bronk
01-05-2013, 03:17
You should carry all that stuff. Don't leave any of it out. In fact, try to think of more stuff you will need. Carry it for 30 miles and when you get to Neels Gap re-evaluate. At least once a week take everything out of your pack and spread it out. Go over each item and anything you haven't used in the last week, get rid of. Do that every week on the trail and by the time you get to Damascus your pack will be where it needs to be.

MuddyWaters
01-05-2013, 13:21
What about the Spot GPS? Is it a good or just plain silly investment?

If you are hiking alone in a place with no cell reception, far from help and other hikers, the spot might be worthwhile to have.

On the AT, paired up with another person, it is not needed. The trail is actuall a fairly busy place in season.

hauptman
02-02-2013, 13:15
Forget all outer pants except for bathing suit and wind pants. A bathing suit is in my opinion the most comfortable, chafe preventing garment ever made. Keeps your little friends high and dry with a cooling breeze.

NLaeger
02-02-2013, 13:29
Don't waste the money on the Spot...I got the InReach when I did a section hike last summer to ease my moms worries and it was total crap! I took it back as soon as I got back from the trail... Half of the time I was out (I did Spring-NOC) it wouldn't pick up signal and it ended up just being extra weight on the trail. I was also able to get cell service almost every night to call my mom and let her know that I was fine!!

Leanthree
02-02-2013, 13:42
Scrap your list. It has so much unnecessary gear that it would be more efficient to start from here:
http://www.backpacker.com/appalachian_trail_gear_list/gear/12536

Feral Bill
02-02-2013, 13:59
Take a look at Canon G12 or G15. Almost as good as an SLR in image quality, functions and ease of use. Weighs less than half of an SLR body with lens. Or the Olympus Pen series. Both are micro 4/3 and use the same lenses.

swjohnsey
02-02-2013, 14:37
Or the Canon S100.

Fairway
02-02-2013, 15:16
Thread is called "$300 challenge" started by Sgt Rock-8/22/2004 You should be able to find it if you type the title into the search box- or some more computer literate user will be along to paste in the appropriate link.

I'll bite, $300 challenge.
(http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/showthread.php?5594-300-Challenge&highlight=%24300%2Bchallenge)

cnp
02-07-2013, 18:21
Or the Canon SX260, can shoot both RAW and JPEG, not something I've found in most other cameras its size.