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Coffee
02-23-2013, 19:51
I decided to hike the JMT about six months ago and now I have six months to the day before I fly out to California. I've spent a lot of time on my gear list so far and I'm looking for any feedback, especially on gear I haven't purchased. I've attached my gear list (in pdf format) to this point. My gear isn't ultra light by any means but I'm pretty happy with the total pack weight ranging from 26.7 pounds to 38.2 pounds at the start of each segment (26.7 at HI, 28.4 at Tuolumne, 30.2 at Red's, 38.2 at MTR). This ranges between 17-24% of my body weight.

If anyone has comments that would be great - especially on things that I'm carrying that I should think about omitting or essential items that I'm overlooking.

Thanks!
19921

wcgornto
02-23-2013, 20:04
Nice spreadsheet. Thad U-Dig-It trowel is pretty useless on any hard soil with its soft edges. The GSI polycarbonate with serrated edges is much better.

i_Hike
02-23-2013, 21:23
Solid list. I just ordered the Montbell UL Down Parka myself, pretty excited for that shipment to arrive.

-10 liter folding bucket - I would prob drop that, even at 2.3 ozs. I assume that is strictly for washing pots, washing face, brushing teeth, etc... Personal preference obviously, but I generally just use nalgene, 1 liter platypus or whatever I drink out of to do those tasks.

- water crossings w/ Resole Asolo Hiking Boots - not familiar with these, but they look like they may take a long time to dry if you were to "dunk" them in a stream crossing. Are you planning on plowing through crossings with these on? Gaitors? I am planning for June hike, so I have ordered these womens x large shoes for $4.00 from sprintaquatics.com http://www.sprintaquatics.com/prodinfo.asp?number=900

haha, yes they look awful, but at $4.00 and only a few ounces i am hoping they will have enough traction/grip to get me across a waist high stream crossing.

Hole-In-The-Hat
02-24-2013, 10:26
Looks like a pretty complete list!

Are you taking a compass and a lighter? - that's about all I could think of...

Coffee
02-24-2013, 10:37
Solid list. I just ordered the Montbell UL Down Parka myself, pretty excited for that shipment to arrive.

-10 liter folding bucket - I would prob drop that, even at 2.3 ozs. I assume that is strictly for washing pots, washing face, brushing teeth, etc... Personal preference obviously, but I generally just use nalgene, 1 liter platypus or whatever I drink out of to do those tasks.

- water crossings w/ Resole Asolo Hiking Boots - not familiar with these, but they look like they may take a long time to dry if you were to "dunk" them in a stream crossing. Are you planning on plowing through crossings with these on? Gaitors? I am planning for June hike, so I have ordered these womens x large shoes for $4.00 from sprintaquatics.com http://www.sprintaquatics.com/prodinfo.asp?number=900

haha, yes they look awful, but at $4.00 and only a few ounces i am hoping they will have enough traction/grip to get me across a waist high stream crossing.

The UL Down Parka is very nice. I wore it recently over a t shirt at around freezing and walked a couple of miles and was warm. I'm planning to use it mainly for stops and at camp.

The folding bucket is definitely something I could cut ... more of a luxury item than a necessity. The boots are an older version of the current Asolo 520 TPS. I just had them resoled and they are like new. Heavy but they have worked well for me in the past. I will add camp/water shoes to my list.

Thanks!

Coffee
02-24-2013, 10:38
Looks like a pretty complete list!

Are you taking a compass and a lighter? - that's about all I could think of...

I am taking a compass although some people say it isn't needed for the JMT. Better to be safe in case I need to bail out on a lesser used trail. I will take a lighter and/or strike anywhere matches. I have to put that on my list to buy after I fly out to CA.

Thanks!

q-tip
02-24-2013, 13:06
Here is my JMT kit for an Aug. '13 thru-hope this helps.



Base Gear List-7




Big Three:
JMT
$ Cost







Granite Gear Crown 60
35.50
$200


o Cuben Pack Cover-
1.00
$55


TT Contrail (Wild Oasis Tarp)
32.00
$200


o Ground Cloth
1.70
$8


o Stakes (10)-
4.00
$35


o Stuff Sack-
0.70
$20


WM Alpinlite 15D (Kodiak 0D Tamarak 35d)
34.30
$465


o Stuff Sacks
2.00
$0


Thermarest Neo Air
14.00
$130


Pad Stuff Sack
0.70
$0


Total:
125.90
$1,168



7.87








Clothing (Carried)









MB Wind Pants-
3.10
$90


Marmot Mica Jacket-
7.00
$140


Marmot Dri-Climb Vest
6.20
$100


Mont Bell Down Camp Jacket-
6.60
$160


Silk Lite Weight Sleep Shirt-
2.80
$24


Silk LiteWeight Sleep Leggings-
0.00
$24


Sleep Socks (1)-Wool
2.60
$4


Hiking Socks (X-tra-1)-
2.60
$5


Sock Liners (X-tra-1)-
1.00
$5


Nike Hiking Leggings-
4.70
$50


Fleece Hat (1)-
1.00
$10


Running Gloves
1.00
$30


Camp Gloves
1.00
$5


Garbage Bag Rain Shirt-
1.50
$0


Stuff Sack-
1.50
$25


Glasses
5.00
$40


Dirty Girl Gaiters
1.20
$20


Pillow Cover
1.70
$25


Balaclava
2.00
$10


Bandana
1.00
$3


MLD Mitten Covers
1.20
$4


Camp Shoes
9.00
$15


Mesh Camp Shoes
0.00
$10


Total:
63.70
$799



3.98








Hygiene/Medical/Emergency/Stuff









Tooth Brush-Toothpaste
2.00
$3


First Aid Kit-
1.20
$10


o Medical Tape-
-



o Gauze-1 Roll-
-



o 3 Band Aids-
-



o 3 Alcohol Wipes-
-



o Tweezer-




Toilet Paper-
0.50
$1


Hand Sanitizer-
1.00
$1


Vitamin I-
0.00
$10


Medications-
6.00



Sun Screen-
1.00
$2


Lip Balm-
1.00
$1


Duct Tape-
1.00
$4


Emergency Kit-
2.00
$8


o Needle-Thread-
-



o Safety Pins (4)-
-



o Tent-Pad Repair Kit-
-



Bladder Parts




Bic Lighter (1)-
0.40
$1


Waterproof Matches (1 Box)-
0.30
$3


Spare Batteries-
0.00
$5


Pen-Paper-
0.50
$0


Head Lamp-
3.00
$40


Trail Maps-
2.50
$25


Deet-
1.00
$3


Extra Plastic Bags-
1.00
$0


Food Bags




Garbage Bag-Grocery Bags




Stuff Sack
1.40
$25







Total:
25.80
$142



1.61








Cook System:









Soto Stove + Windscreen
3.30
$65


Windscreen-Alcohol
0.00



Stuff Sack (Stove)-
0.80
$0


Fuel (4 oz)-
7.00
$4


Oil Camp XLS Cook Pot-
7.90
$26


Pot Cozy
0.00
0.00


Spoon- (2)
1.50
$5


Stuff Sack (Food)-
0.00
$25


Bear Rope-
2.50
$0


Towel-
0.50
$5


Pot Stabilizer
1.00
$8


Bear Vault
38.20








Total:
62.70
$138



3.92








Water Treatment:









Steri Pen w/ Batteries-Case-
4.50
$125


Spare Batteries
1.00
$10


Aqamira Tabs
0.50
$6


Nalgene UL Water Bottle (1)-
3.00
$6


Nalgene Soft Bottle
2.00
$8


MSR Bladder (80 oz)-
6.20
$25







Total:
17.20
$180



1.08








Wearing:









Ex Officio Long Sleeve Shirt-
7.10
$30


Running Shorts-
3.20
$25


Hiking Socks-
2.50
$4


Sock Liners-
0.90
$3


Hiking Poles-Leki-
19.40
$125


Montrail AT + Train Runners
26.60
$75


Olympus Tough TG-320
5.50
$150


Knife/Whistle/Compass-
1.40
$35


Heart Rate Monitor-
3.20
$200


Knee Brace
6.00
$30


Ankle Brace
8.00
$90


Running Hat-
2.00
$20







Total:
85.80
$787



5.36








Electronics:









MP3/Headphones/Charger-
3.00
$85


Cell Phone/Charger
4.30
$60


Camera Charger + Spare Battery
2.30
$20







Total:
9.60
$165



0.60








Other:









Ditty Bag-
1.20
$12


o Credit Cards (2)-
-



o Cash-
-



o Drivers License-
-



o Insurance Card-
-



o Phone Card-
-
$25


o Extra Reading Glasses (1)-
0.70
$10


o Emergency Numbers-
0.00
$0







Total:
1.90
$47



0.12



Total Cost:

$3,426












Food-Water









Water Carried-
33.00



Food-4 Days-2.0 Lbs/Day (32 OZ.)
128.00








Totals:
161.00




10.06








Grand Totals:









Base Weight In Pack:
306.80




19.18








Weight Worn:
85.80




5.36








Skin-Out Base Weight:
411.78




25.74








Weight Pack+Food+Water
467.8




29.24








Total Skin Out Weight:
553.60




34.60








Total Skin Out/Body Weight (150 #):
2953.60




184.60

i_Hike
02-24-2013, 13:52
Thats a big list. Steri pen and aquamira? This isn't A.T. water we're talking about

Coffee
02-24-2013, 23:47
Thanks for the gear list ... Always great to compare to other lists.

i_Hike
02-25-2013, 14:29
Here is my JMT gear list as of today. Still needs a bit of work. Two major things to note...
1. Beginning hike in early June - ice ax not included yet. Will purchase and learn if weather takes turn for the worse in the next 2 months.
2. Hiking with girlfriend - obviously shared items include tent, cooking gear, toiletries,sunscreen, bugspray, coffee mug, trowel, gps, maps etc... Most of which are in my pack now.

Still heavier than I would like as of now, given that we are sharing items. Any advice to lighten up? (hoping she will realize that her Kelty pack is far too heavy, maybe purple ULA Circuit as B-day present or something)

Venchka
02-25-2013, 15:53
I wholeheartedly second Q-Tip's Western Mountaineering bag. I own their Antelope Super Dry Loft bag. Absolutely superb piece of gear.

I ran across this earlier today while researching MSR tarps. You may find it helpful.

John Muir Trail Trip: http://www.catchafallingstar.com/jmt/johnmuirtrail2003.htm

Wayne

Hole-In-The-Hat
02-25-2013, 16:22
i_Hike, do you really need to carry 16 oz of fuel? You could carry one canister and buy one at Reds Meadow, VVR, and/or MTR. All of these carry most canisters - you could check in advance to confirm they carry your particular model.

The other thought would be to rent or buy a Bearikade canister - for the Weekender, you're looking at ~31 ounces, that's 13 less than your spreadsheet. If you don't want to rent one, you might be able to find one used, or buy a new one and sell it after your trip.

i_Hike
02-25-2013, 17:21
Hole in hat... Yes 16oz fuel might be excessive, at least until final push from VVR. Even then I'd prob only be toting one 8oz canister myself. Still trying to figure out if super cat alcohol stove along with denatured alcohol supply would be lighter than Canisters and pocket rocket.

will look into buying used bearikade...

Coffee
02-26-2013, 12:47
I've ordered a custom 12 inch Bearikade for the trip. The canisters are pricy but they supposedly hold their value well. I couldn't find any used cans available online when I searched.

Coffee
02-26-2013, 12:48
Hole in hat... Yes 16oz fuel might be excessive, at least until final push from VVR.

I have the JetBoil and I only plan to carry one canister except from MTR to Whitney where I'll probably carry two just to be safe. The JetBoil is super efficient and I've been very pleased with fuel consumption in my tests. The one issue with it is that it doesn't simmer food very well which is somewhat annoying. It's really just a boiling machine.

jasonG
04-01-2013, 00:47
ditch the trowlel (soil in the sierras is really loose and you can just use a rock or your heel.
ditch the water bucket..

Your pack and tent are a little overkill..
If you like ULA you could go with the OHM and save 20oz.

and you could with something like a tarptent moment you could save another 20oz
(or get something in cuben that will get you around 1lb but cost a lot more..)

You could do a lot better on cooking too..
Your pot should be under 3oz and then get a alky or esbit stove and then a windscreen like a caldera or suluk46

http://www.suluk46.com/products%20%20-%20P13%20TEA%20System.html

http://litetrail.com/shop/litetrail-titanium-solid-fuel-cook-

http://www.traildesigns.com/stoves/caldera-cone-system


You could get away with only one shirt..

staehpj1
04-02-2013, 07:05
will look into buying used bearikade...
They are the lightest, but... Look at the actual specs before deciding. Reading on various forums including this one you will see inaccurate and exaggerated claims for the Bearikade and comparisons that are not of comparable sizes. Comments sometimes run along the lines of "$100 to save a pound" where if you compare like sized it is more difference in cost and less difference in weight.

From a post I made on another forum:
"The numbers are:
* Bearikade Weekender - 650 cubic inches, 31 ounces, $249
* Bearvault BV500 - 700 cubic inches, 41 ounces, $79.95
or for the smaller size:
* Bearikade Scout- 500 cubic inches, 28 ounces, $219
* Bearvault BV450 - 440 cubic inches, 33 ounces, $66.95

Personally I find the weight savings of the Bearikade models to not really justify the price, for me at least. For the large size $169 extra to save 10 ounces might almost start to look tempting, but $152 extra to save 5 ounces seems very dubious to me. Those would be some of the most expensive ounces saved on my list if I went that route. If I use the Bear Vault models I can buy both for way less than one Bearikade of any size and use the one best suited to the hike I am doing. The flexibility of having both is nice because when you can use the smaller one you can probably same additional weight by taking a smaller lighter pack. In my case on trips where the BV 450 is enough I am likely to be using a 10 ounce lighter pack as well for a weight savings of 22 ounces over the BV500. It is even 12 ounce lighter than if I had the Bearikade Weekender. Obviously I'd save weight with the Scout, but how many folks are willing to splurge for a Scout and a Weekender. Having all three Bearikades would be ideal but $762 would probably be hard to justify for most of us.

I figure that I can fairly easily get to a base weight of 11-12 pounds (depending on how much clothing I take) with the BV450 even if carrying a few luxury items. At that point I am really not willing to spring for another $152 to save 5 ounces.

On the other hand if you need a really big canister the Bearikade Expedition is in a class by itself as far as I know. I sure as heck would not want to use it on shorter trips or ones with frequent resupply options though. I guess if you are doing one big trip where you need that capacity renting or buying and reselling one makes sense. I really don't see it for the smaller sizes though unless you will only need a canister once."

Not knocking the Bearikade, just suggesting that you need to use the actual numbers when deciding.

Of course renting or buying and reselling are options if you only need it for one trip or at least very rarely. Personally I'd rather own my canister and use it, when needed, forever.

One other reason to go with a Bearikade is if you need the size of the Expedition model. I think they are alone in that size range. Personally that one holds more than I will probably ever be willing to carry on a backpacking trip though.

DaFireMedic
04-02-2013, 21:42
I went through this same decision for my hike last year with my 2 sons. I was planning on using an alcohol cat can stove, but decided on a canister stove after looking at the distances between resupply on the JMT. The advantage of the alcohol stove is on the shorter sections (basically, everything before MTR) where you know about how much fuel you will use and only have to carry that amount. But after MTR, you will use enough of an 8 oz canister to where I believe you would do better with the Pocket Rocket. Based on test results that I've read for the Pocket Rocket, you can figure about 10-12 full boils (2 cups of water) for the 4 oz and 22-24 with the 8 oz canisters depending on the conditions (wind and such). Unless you are cooking all three meals each day, you would probably be able to go with a single 4 oz until Red's Meadow depending on your itinerary, and another to MTR. You should only need one 8 oz canister after MTR. I actually went with the Jetboil Zip for the 3 of us, as it uses less fuel to boil the same amount of water, but does weigh more. Although we carried the remainder of the previous 4 oz canister to be sure, we ended up only using one 8 oz canister after MTR for the 3 of us with no problem. We were also able to spread the weight among the 3 of us, but alone I would likely take the Pocket Rocket. This was just my experience with the same decision, your usage patterns may be different from mine.

Also, Bearikades are getting tough to find used. I have a friend that had been trying to buy one but they keep selling used for nearly as much as a new one on eBay (This is happening with all bear canisters). Unless you can arrange with someone on a forum to buy theirs after their hike, you may be better off buying a new one, then selling it. I just went with the Bearvault.

Coffee
04-02-2013, 21:52
ditch the trowlel (soil in the sierras is really loose and you can just use a rock or your heel.
ditch the water bucket..

Your pack and tent are a little overkill..
If you like ULA you could go with the OHM and save 20oz.

and you could with something like a tarptent moment you could save another 20oz
(or get something in cuben that will get you around 1lb but cost a lot more..)


I switched from the trowel to a snow stake which weighs only one ounce at the suggestion of someone on the JMT Yahoo group. I ditched the water bucket as well.

On the pack, I figure that if I lighten up the shelter, then I could switch to a ULA Circuit from the Catalyst. For example, if I switch from the Copper Spur to the Hexamid and from the Catalyst to the Circuit, my base weight would be just over 16 pounds and total weight would be well under 30 pounds at the start of every segment except MTR where it would top out at just under 35 pounds. That may be pushing the design limits of the Circuit a little...

I'm not sure that I'm ready to switch from the CS to something like the Hexamid yet. I don't feel like I have the experience to properly pitch the Hexamid and the CS pitch is foolproof. But it is something to think about. Thanks for the input.

lvnv1212
04-03-2013, 14:34
Good list, good decisions on water bucket and trowel. I used this one http://www.qiwiz.net/trowels.html .4 oz. Worked great. You are in good shape - but don't worry about pitching the Zpacks hexamid...it's easy. I have one. I consider it foolproof. You can watch a video on the website.

Coffee
04-06-2013, 18:56
I've made some changes to substantially lighten my JMT gear list:

http://www.ramblinghiker.com/?p=182

The most significant change is going with the Hexamid. I also have an order for a ULA Curcuit to replace my barely used Catalyst. I'll likely be selling my Catalyst as soon as I can confirm that my gear will fit into the Circuit!

DaFireMedic
04-08-2013, 01:24
Some good choices, I think. I'm getting ready to purchase a Hexamid Twin as well for next years hike. Maybe I missed it but I didn't see a ground sheet on your list. One word of caution with the Hexamid is that unless you are comfortable with using a tarp in stormy weather, consider getting the bathtub groundsheet that Z-Packs offers (I will be, expensive but better than a miserable night in the rain) or something similar. A lady we hiked alongside for a few days on last years trip was using the Hexamid with a Polycryo ground sheet. We encountered 4 consecutive days of heavy thunderstorms, during which she had great difficulty keeping the water from getting on top of her ground cloth and into her sleeping area. She ended up bailing off the hike early. It looks like a great tent when properly set up. I was considering some other, more economical groundsheets but I think I'm gonna bite the bullet and get the Z-Packs poncho/groundsheet. If I feel comfortable enough that it will do the job as rain protection (and I think I will), I will leave my rain jacket at home and save a few more ounces.

Coffee
04-08-2013, 07:30
Some good choices, I think. I'm getting ready to purchase a Hexamid Twin as well for next years hike. Maybe I missed it but I didn't see a ground sheet on your list. One word of caution with the Hexamid is that unless you are comfortable with using a tarp in stormy weather, consider getting the bathtub groundsheet that Z-Packs offers (I will be, expensive but better than a miserable night in the rain) or something similar. A lady we hiked alongside for a few days on last years trip was using the Hexamid with a Polycryo ground sheet. We encountered 4 consecutive days of heavy thunderstorms, during which she had great difficulty keeping the water from getting on top of her ground cloth and into her sleeping area. She ended up bailing off the hike early. It looks like a great tent when properly set up. I was considering some other, more economical groundsheets but I think I'm gonna bite the bullet and get the Z-Packs poncho/groundsheet. If I feel comfortable enough that it will do the job as rain protection (and I think I will), I will leave my rain jacket at home and save a few more ounces.
Thanks for looking at the list. I ordered the package deal including the cuben ground sheet. They have the total discounted by $25 if the tent, optional beak and ground sheet are all ordered at the same time. Not a cheap shelter by any means but I'm really looking forward to using it. They list the weight at 19 ounces including the groundsheet and stakes.

Kanook
04-23-2013, 10:11
Nice spreadsheet. Thad U-Dig-It trowel is pretty useless on any hard soil with its soft edges. The GSI polycarbonate with serrated edges is much better.

I use a MSR Blizzard Snow Stake for digging cat holes.

It weighs less than an ounce, costs less than $2, and it doubles as an extra stake.

Kanook
04-23-2013, 10:28
Hole in hat... Yes 16oz fuel might be excessive, at least until final push from VVR. Even then I'd prob only be toting one 8oz canister myself. Still trying to figure out if super cat alcohol stove along with denatured alcohol supply would be lighter than Canisters and pocket rocket.

will look into buying used bearikade...

Your list is a lot like mine.

I've used MSR Pocket Rocket and Alcohol Stoves on the JMT. For me, alcohol stove is better / lighter. I use a Minibulldesign BIOS #4. Make sure you have a very good windscreen though.

Some suggestions. I don't think you'll need the microspikes - especially this year. I didn't have, or need them in 2011, and that was a huge snow year. I would bring the pack cover. You could switch out your Precip for a DryDucks jacket. Not very durable but it will get the job done and half the weight, and for less than $20. I would take a 2L Platypus for camp use. You could ditch the Salt/Pepper container and use those little paper packs from fast food places or a zip lock. Definitely bring the head net (1oz). Simblissity Gaiters are awesome. Switch the trowell for an MSR Blizzard snow stake. Maybe find a lighter cheap plastic coffee cup, or better yet, don't make coffee in the morning and save the fuel. I took caffeine pills with me back in 2010 when I was hiking in France - before I quit caffeine.

Kanook
04-23-2013, 10:32
[QUOTE=i_Hike;1426244]Here is my JMT gear list as of today. Still needs a bit of work. Two major things to note...
1. Beginning hike in early June - ice ax not included yet. Will purchase and learn if weather takes turn for the worse in the next 2 months.
QUOTE]

You don't need the ice axe - especially if you have trekking poles. I doubt if your feet will touch any snow this year unless you go off the trail.

i_Hike
04-23-2013, 12:09
Kanook- thanks for reviewing list

1. Ice ax is definitely out given the weather
2. Micro spikes likely out as well, barring massive snowfall in the next month
3. Have snow baskets for my leki poles, might switch back to normal, smaller baskets
4. Thinking about dropping trowel all together and using rocks, pole, stick, etc
5. Will use your salt and pepper packet idea instead of container thing
6. Simmblissity gaiter website indicates he has stopped production on his gaiters for a while. Still searching for alternative ( as I will be wearing trail runners Cascadia 8's, not 'hiking boot')
7. Will prob stick with pocket rocket, plan on heating water quickly for morning coffee etc ( worried about finding canisters in Yosemite near happy isle , as clearly can't fly from Boston with them)

perrito
04-23-2013, 13:19
Kanook- thanks for reviewing list
...
6. Simmblissity gaiter website indicates he has stopped production on his gaiters for a while. Still searching for alternative ( as I will be wearing trail runners Cascadia 8's, not 'hiking boot')
...


Have you considered Dirty Girl Gaiters (http://www.dirtygirlgaiters.com/)?

i_Hike
04-23-2013, 15:06
Thanks for suggestion Perrito.
It seems like the velcro that needs to be put on the heel of the shoe to make dirty girl gaiters effective might pose a problem with the Brook Cascadia line (as it is not a smooth finish and could get fairly messy with super glue to hold it on)

perrito
04-23-2013, 15:32
Thanks for suggestion Perrito.
It seems like the velcro that needs to be put on the heel of the shoe to make dirty girl gaiters effective might pose a problem with the Brook Cascadia line (as it is not a smooth finish and could get fairly messy with super glue to hold it on)
It's not super glue. It's a very sticky adhesive on on of the velcro backs.

DaFireMedic
04-23-2013, 15:55
Kanook- thanks for reviewing list

4. Thinking about dropping trowel all together and using rocks, pole, stick, etc


I'd suggest going with what Kanook said, the Snow Stake (I used one as well). It not only digs very well and is under an ounce, but its a pain trying to find a stick, then finding another stick when that one breaks in the hard soil, dig a hole, etc. when you really gotta go, or trying to dig your hole immediately after. You'll get the briefing from the rangers when you get your permit regarding digging the hole, stirring it in with the dirt (don't use the Snow Stake for that part....), etc. Its nice just to dig a quick hole, do your business right into it and not have to touch or move the stuff again. In addition, there were a few places where it really came in handy as a tent stake when the soil was very loose. We could have made it work with one of the Ti shepherds hook style we had and a rock to anchor it, but the Snow Stake just made it easier in a few places. If it was just one use or the other, I might not bother with it, but it truly turns out to be multi-use. I'm an ultralight backpacker and its one of the few "conveniences" that I carry even in the local mountains.

BTW: Other than some of the color designs, which are a personal taste, Dirty Girl gaiters are extremely popular on the JMT for good reason.

Kanook
04-25-2013, 21:03
"( worried about finding canisters in Yosemite near happy isle , as clearly can't fly from Boston with them)"

Fuel canisters are very easy to buy in Yosemite near Happy Isles. There is gear shop about 100 yards from the Permit Hut near the visitor's centre. Real easy to find.

staehpj1
04-28-2013, 09:43
"( worried about finding canisters in Yosemite near happy isle , as clearly can't fly from Boston with them)"

Fuel canisters are very easy to buy in Yosemite near Happy Isles. There is gear shop about 100 yards from the Permit Hut near the visitor's centre. Real easy to find.

I am told they are also available a number of places along the way. So it shouldn't be a problem.

Kanook
04-28-2013, 20:10
I am told they are also available a number of places along the way. So it shouldn't be a problem.

Yep. You can buy cannisters at Tuolumne, Mammoth Lakes, Reds Meadows (I believe?), VVR, and MTR. After MTR, you would have to leave the trail.

So long as you're not using the european style cannisters (puncture style) - you won't find them. Last year I was hiking with a fellow from Italy who ran into that problem. He had to buy a new stove at Tuolumne Meadows.

DaFireMedic
04-30-2013, 13:14
There are two places in Yosemite Valley to buy them, the gear shop that staehpj1 mentioned, and the Mountain Shop in Curry Village right near Happy Isles. They never really run out, so it shouldn't be a problem. Also, every place along the way that Kanook mentioned including Red's Meadow, as well as Mammoth should you want to get off the trail for a rest day (We spent 2 rest days in the Motel 6 there, had pizza and meatball sandwiches at Nik-n-Wille's, highly recommended)

mxracer33x
04-30-2013, 16:29
Thanks for suggestion Perrito.
It seems like the velcro that needs to be put on the heel of the shoe to make dirty girl gaiters effective might pose a problem with the Brook Cascadia line (as it is not a smooth finish and could get fairly messy with super glue to hold it on)
Im a big Dirt Girl Gaiter Fan. I have about 500 miles on mine on a couple pairs of shoes, and just picked up a new pair for my JMT hike this year. I run Cascadias, and The supplied Velcro didn't work for me. It didn't work on any of my trail shoes after it got wet. I found using a non-adhesive backed Velcro piece, attached with superglue proved to hold up well. Over 300 miles on my Cascadias currently.

Kanook
05-04-2013, 21:05
There are two places in Yosemite Valley to buy them, the gear shop that staehpj1 mentioned, and the Mountain Shop in Curry Village right near Happy Isles. They never really run out, so it shouldn't be a problem. Also, every place along the way that Kanook mentioned including Red's Meadow, as well as Mammoth should you want to get off the trail for a rest day (We spent 2 rest days in the Motel 6 there, had pizza and meatball sandwiches at Nik-n-Wille's, highly recommended)

I second the Motel 6 in Mammoth Lakes. I've stayed there 4 times now. Close to everything, decent rooms, and a good price.

neuraljitter
05-20-2013, 14:11
I'm looking over everyone's gear lists and am most worried about perfecting my clothing for the trail. I'll be hiking late June-mid-July.

My plan is to simplify my system as much as possible. I planned to bring:
-Pair of lightweight base layers, hopefully wool (if I can find some affordable)
-Short-sleeve synthetic t-shirt & lightweight hiking pants that zip off to shorts
-Fleece layers for warmth at night
-Pair of Driducks for windy/wet conditions

And of course some socks, glove liners, hat, and underwear, but these 4 layers are my main concern. Will I freeze at night or does this set seem solid?

DaFireMedic
05-20-2013, 16:57
I'm looking over everyone's gear lists and am most worried about perfecting my clothing for the trail. I'll be hiking late June-mid-July.

My plan is to simplify my system as much as possible. I planned to bring:
-Pair of lightweight base layers, hopefully wool (if I can find some affordable)
-Short-sleeve synthetic t-shirt & lightweight hiking pants that zip off to shorts
-Fleece layers for warmth at night
-Pair of Driducks for windy/wet conditions

And of course some socks, glove liners, hat, and underwear, but these 4 layers are my main concern. Will I freeze at night or does this set seem solid?

One of the beautiful things about the JMT is the mild weather. Your list looks solid. This is what most wear and you should be fine. We all wore zip-offs and they worked well as my kids took the time to swim at several places along the way. You shouldn't be uncomfortably cold at night, provided your sleeping bag or quilt is adequate. Temps for us only occasionally dropped just under 30 degrees. I am a cold sleeper and was never cold in a 25-35 degree quilt. Another thing I recommend though is not to use glove liners as your only gloves. Instead, I would bring a decent pair of fleece gloves. I saw people using only glove liners on the trail who said that they weren't adequate and that they would be bringing fleece next time.

My boys were fine around camp at night with fleece jackets. I'm sure you already know this, but just make sure that you aren't sleeping in the clothes you just hiked in. I never felt that I needed to wear my base layers (I just brought poly's) to sleep for warmth, although I did wear them to keep my quilt clean. I saw others with 40 degree quilts who wore their long underwear to supplement the bag and they said they were comfortable. But this way is not for me. I want to be comfortable in my bag, with the underwear as extra in case its colder than I anticipated.

Good choice on the Dri-Ducks. They saved my hike when we encountered 4 consecutive days of thunderstorms.