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todd52
03-10-2013, 16:24
Is 3-1/2 to 4 pounds considered heavy for a backpack?. I'm talking about just the backpack itself with nothing in it.

rocketsocks
03-10-2013, 16:32
Is 3-1/2 to 4 pounds considered heavy for a backpack?. I'm talking about just the backpack itself with nothing in it.


Now 4lb I'd consider to be getting more towards the middle to heavier side of life, 3 1/2lbs. I'd consider in the solid middle of the range.:)

shakey_snake
03-10-2013, 16:36
What are your plans for it?

That sounds about average for a mountaineering pack. Are you climbing Everest soon? :D

Franco
03-10-2013, 17:28
it depends.. (it always does)For a load up to around 35 lbs you can get packs at around 2 lbs that will do it, for example the ULA Circuit (2.2lbs stripped of some of the extra bits...)
Regularly having loads over 35lbs or so will require (for comfort) a more solid frame , therefore a heavier pack.

broken arrow
03-10-2013, 17:37
it is all up to you if it feels right, and depends on how heavy-a-load you plan on truckin'.

Mrs Baggins
03-10-2013, 18:06
How big are you? Personally, at 4' 10" and 120 lbs I wouldn't carry one that heavy. I have an REI Flash that is right around 2 lbs. And I'd like to find one lighter than that but it's probably not possible and still have a comfortable hip belt and ample interior space. I'm returning the Flash because the shoulder straps keep falling to the sides and that makes me shrug my shoulders all day til they feel like their ripping. I can't stand it anymore. My husband's does exactly the same thing.

hikerboy57
03-10-2013, 18:37
What are your plans for it?

That sounds about average for a mountaineering pack. Are you climbing Everest soon? :D
really? i use an osprey atmos 65, weight 3lbs 10 oz, and ive met plenty of thrus whove used it too. and in a way youre climbing everest 20 times if you factor in total elevation gain.
its really about how the pack carries your kit. a lighter pack doesnt necessarily carry your load better.
i am switching to something smaller this year, as ive been able to get my load weight down and i dont need as much room for 3 season backpacking. i love the atmos, and may just get an atmos50.without food and water im around 23lbs fully loaded

Another Kevin
03-10-2013, 20:04
really? i use an osprey atmos 65, weight 3lbs 10 oz, and ive met plenty of thrus whove used it too. and in a way youre climbing everest 20 times if you factor in total elevation gain.

+1 to "use what carries well." My daughter swears by her Gregory - it's one of the heavier packs that she tried, but it carries better than anything else she's tried. I have a 3 lb 12 oz pack myself (an ALPS Orizaba 3900). It's heavier than some, but it fits me, and I'm long in the torso. (It has an adjustable torso, and it fits only on the longest setting.) A good many UL packs don't fit me. Also, it's 3 lb 12 oz with an integrated pack cover, so I don't need to carry a separate pack cover. I save a few ounces there.

Yes, it's a mountaineering pack. If I'm out in full-on winter, I need to lash on snowshoes and a crampon bag and maybe even an ice axe, so just what sort of pack do you think I'd need? The real difference is that a mountaineering pack is taller and narrower, and has more lash points for gear.

I'm just a clueless weekender, but I can't imagine that having to carry the thing a longer distance would change my opinion of "use what fits."

shakey_snake
03-10-2013, 20:17
really? i use an osprey atmos 65, weight 3lbs 10 oz, and ive met plenty of thrus who've used it too.HYOH, of course, but my god that's heavy.


its really about how the pack carries your kit. a lighter pack doesnt necessarily carry your load better.Sure. But suspension and shoulder padding doesn't weight that much! Lets be honest, packs get to be over 3 pounds because they either:

1. Are made from the same materials they used a billion years ago for packs (I'm looking at you, WWII ear wax covered canvas rucksack)
2. Are made of a bombproof material that is meant to survive extreme abuse (e.g. military combat) so that pack makers doesn't have abusive users returning them for a warranty replacement.
3. Contain numerous "organization features" (marketing people love these) and compartments for someone that can't bother to learn the skill of packing a pack and keep track of his diddys.
4. Are external frame packs made for carry heavy amounts of mountaineering/climbing gear.

Either way, a weekender or thru hiker or anywhere in between is better served avoiding as many of those traps as possible.


i am switching to something smaller this year, as ive been able to get my load weight down and i dont need as much room for 3 season backpacking. i love the atmos, and may just get an atmos50.without food and water im around 23lbs fully loaded Probably a fine choice, but I'm sure you could be just as comfortable with a lighter option.

hikerboy57
03-10-2013, 20:29
HYOH, of course, but my god that's heavy.

Sure. But suspension and shoulder padding doesn't weight that much! Lets be honest, packs get to be over 3 pounds because they either:

1. Are made from the same materials they used a billion years ago for packs (I'm looking at you, WWII ear wax covered canvas rucksack)
2. Are made of a bombproof material that is meant to survive extreme abuse (e.g. military combat) so that pack makers doesn't have abusive users returning them for a warranty replacement.
3. Contain numerous "organization features" (marketing people love these) and compartments for someone that can't bother to learn the skill of packing a pack and keep track of his diddys.
4. Are external frame packs made for carry heavy amounts of mountaineering/climbing gear.

Either way, a weekender or thru hiker or anywhere in between is better served avoiding as many of those traps as possible.

Probably a fine choice, but I'm sure you could be just as comfortable with a lighter option.
hyoh indeed, preferably without condescending comments. i know how to pack a pack,ive been backpacking for over 35 years. those pockets are very useful in keeping necessary gear at hand. bombproof is a good thing for a thru hike unless you just want to buy two packs,and there are also a few here with multiple thruhikes that still prefer an external frame.its not that important to many of us to shave evry ounce. if i can carry the gear i want to bring comfortably for 15-20 miles, im cool with that.
i am considering ula, but i ve never put one on,the atmos is a comfortable friend so im probably going to just downsize a tad .jurys still out

MuddyWaters
03-10-2013, 20:44
Is 3-1/2 to 4 pounds considered heavy for a backpack?. I'm talking about just the backpack itself with nothing in it.

Not really. Its about middle of the range today overall.

However, in the world of long-distance hiking, it would be considered to be at the heavier end of the spectrum.

Does it matter? Nope.

Plenty of folks carry a 2.5 lb backpack, with a 15 lb base weight.

What is better, that or a 4 lb backpack with a 12 lb base weight?

Lighter overall is better, doesnt matter much how you get there as long as your needs are met.

rocketsocks
03-10-2013, 20:54
Not really. Its about middle of the range today overall.

However, in the world of long-distance hiking, it would be considered to be at the heavier end of the spectrum.

Does it matter? Nope.

Plenty of folks carry a 2.5 lb backpack, with a 15 lb base weight.

What is better, that or a 4 lb backpack with a 12 lb base weight?

Lighter overall is better, doesnt matter much how you get there as long as your needs are met.Ya know, your right, It is more towards the heavey side of middle....I didn't really factor in that packs are getting so ridiculously light, and was thinking more of old school traditional numbers. where a 2lb. pack would be considered light weight. But as you and many have said...Doesn't really matter, unless it matters to the user...bottom line!

shakey_snake
03-10-2013, 21:06
hyoh indeed, preferably without condescending comments.I'm not intentionally being condescending, you are coming across as extremely defensive, though. e.g.

i know how to pack a pack,ive been backpacking for over 35 years. I wasn't saying you didn't or even implying so, so why respond in such a manner?

I'm simply saying that organizational features like a bunch of pockets and zippers (aka weight) are features that put people at ease when contemplating their purchases, before they develop those skills. In a consumer culture like we live in, manufacturers are selling that peace of mind to the customer, not just the product (and it's performance) itself. Whether that continues to be important for someone that has developed those skills (like yourself) should most certainly be reevaluated if you are going to purchase a new pack, rather than simply going with what has worked in the past. Of course, known fit and the value of your time obviously an important factor into the equation, too.

Now, not to make this all about you, but to be informative for the thread starter: if he's already asking about weight (given the thread title) maybe he's questioning exactly what he gets for that added weight? IMO, as indicated by my first post here, he should get mountaineering ability.


bombproof is a good thing for a thru hike unless you just want to buy two packsAre there no ULA packs that make it the whole way? Do they really fail more often than heavier packs?

oroy38
03-10-2013, 21:15
3.5lbs is about middle of the road in the mainstream pack market. It's not particularly heavy, but it's not terribly light either. You could certainly find more on either end of the spectrum. I carry a Kifaru MMR and that weighs around 9lbs, so by comparison a 3.5lbs pack is very light. The only other brand out there I've ever tried that can haul weight as comfortably as a Kifaru is Mystery Ranch, but their packs are also very heavy by mainstream standards due to the materials used, the frame, suspension system, etc.

Don't worry too much about pack weight. Focus more on getting your kit streamlined before you worry too much about what pack you're carrying it in.

There are three basic factors when looking at packs:
Durability - The quality of construction and the durability of the materials used.
Support - Internal/External frame, no frame, etc
Features - Ice Axe loops, water bottle holders, daisy chain, doo hickeys and dealy bobs

All of these have an impact on pack weight, and it's up to you to look at the load you'll be carrying and then prioritize. Most important, however, is how the pack carries the weight of your gear. If you find that a 4lbs pack carries the same load much more comfortably than a 2lbs pack, then why bother with the weight savings if it's not as comfortable?

hikerboy57
03-10-2013, 21:19
I'm not intentionally being condescending, you are coming across as extremely defensive, though. e.g.
I wasn't saying you didn't or even implying so, so why respond in such a manner?

I'm simply saying that organizational features like a bunch of pockets and zippers (aka weight) are features that put people at ease when contemplating their purchases, before they develop those skills. In a consumer culture like we live in, manufacturers are selling that peace of mind to the customer, not just the product (and it's performance) itself. Whether that continues to be important for someone that has developed those skills (like yourself) should most certainly be reevaluated if you are going to purchase a new pack, rather than simply going with what has worked in the past. Of course, known fit and the value of your time obviously an important factor into the equation, too.

Now, not to make this all about you, but to be informative for the thread starter: if he's already asking about weight (given the thread title) maybe he's questioning exactly what he gets for that added weight? IMO, as indicated by my first post here, he should get mountaineering ability.

Are there no ULA packs that make it the whole way? Do they really fail more often than heavier packs?
i am still contemplating a ula.it would be a lot easier if stores carried them as i could look at size, fit it properly etc.see how i could pack it, etc.
anyhoo, if there were really just one right pack for everyone, wed have nothing to discuss, would we.suffice it to say yes 4lbs is getting toward the heavy side and you can be sub 3lbs and be fine as well.

yellowsirocco
03-10-2013, 21:20
I tried a UL pack this past summer. REI Flash 62. It wasn't uncomfortable, but it wasn't comfortable either. I returned it and got a Gregory z65 that weighs a good bit more. It carries like a dream.

Don't fret about an extra pound on your back if it makes the thing more comfortable.

Venchka
03-10-2013, 21:33
Any pack must fit well. Feel good. Handle your imagined loads (any season, unless you can afford more than 1 pack) all day. Day after day.
A 2 pound pack that doesn't fit right, tortures your body or isn't large enough to hold your winter bag and tent is useless or worse. Conversely, us cavemen love our hundred pound Terraplanes for a weekend or a month.
There is no one answer. It depends. Would I like my Terraplane better if it performed as well and only weioghed 3 pounds? Sure. Am I willing to pay $100 or more per pound to shed those 3 or 4 pounds? Nope.
Buy on fit, carrying capacity, fit and comfort, your budget, weight.

Wayne

rocketsocks
03-10-2013, 22:08
I was gonna drag my old Kelty pack behind my truck, but decided to keep it unless I ever need to hump 4600ci+ of stuff.

Rasty
03-10-2013, 22:20
I'm not intentionally being condescending, you are coming across as extremely defensive, though. e.g.
I wasn't saying you didn't or even implying so, so why respond in such a manner?

I'm simply saying that organizational features like a bunch of pockets and zippers (aka weight) are features that put people at ease when contemplating their purchases, before they develop those skills. In a consumer culture like we live in, manufacturers are selling that peace of mind to the customer, not just the product (and it's performance) itself. Whether that continues to be important for someone that has developed those skills (like yourself) should most certainly be reevaluated if you are going to purchase a new pack, rather than simply going with what has worked in the past. Of course, known fit and the value of your time obviously an important factor into the equation, too.

Now, not to make this all about you, but to be informative for the thread starter: if he's already asking about weight (given the thread title) maybe he's questioning exactly what he gets for that added weight? IMO, as indicated by my first post here, he should get mountaineering ability.

Are there no ULA packs that make it the whole way? Do they really fail more often than heavier packs?
i am still contemplating a ula.it would be a lot easier if stores carried them as i could look at size, fit it properly etc.see how i could pack it, etc.
anyhoo, if there were really just one right pack for everyone, wed have nothing to discuss, would we.suffice it to say yes 4lbs is getting toward the heavy side and you can be sub 3lbs and be fine as well.

You can try mine in August. It's a medium/ medium Circuit.

atmilkman
03-10-2013, 22:23
I was gonna drag my old Kelty pack behind my truck, but decided to keep it unless I ever need to hump 4600ci+ of stuff.
I love my Kelty Trekker. Weighs 5.02lbs. I use it for basecamping and overnighter where I'm also bringing a camping stool. Hikes are usually 8mi. max.

Bronk
03-10-2013, 22:26
Plenty of people hike with a pack that weighs 5+ pounds...if you go to an outfitter most of the packs they sell weigh that much. Most weekenders (which is who most of the equipment is sold to) don't pay attention to weight, and from the marketing going on the term "ultralight" is being twisted. I've seen tents advertised as "ultralight backpacker tent" that weigh 6 lbs.

Many thruhikers start out with heavy equipment, and because a pack is one of the more expensive items to replace, they just hang onto it for the whole trip...I saw more people switching out tents and sleeping bags than packs. You can do it with a 5 pound pack.

hikerboy57
03-10-2013, 22:26
You can try mine in August. It's a medium/ medium Circuit.
yeah well i was looking to buy in the next month or so so i can try it before august

rocketsocks
03-10-2013, 22:27
I love my Kelty Trekker. Weighs 5.02lbs. I use it for basecamping and overnighter where I'm also bringing a camping stool. Hikes are usually 8mi. max.Yeah it served me well, but I was twenty years younger, and drunk, it wasn't a problem. hehe

MuddyWaters
03-10-2013, 22:36
yeah well i was looking to buy in the next month or so so i can try it before august

Talk to Chris @ ULA
Order two sizes
return the one that you like least.

pretty simple.
Yes it cost you $34 extra shipping
That, or you can sit and wonder

Ive spent literally hundreds of dollars on shipping and return fees ordering and returning items I had no other way to try out.
From socks, to shirts , to packs, to tents.
If theres no other way, theres no other way
A solution just doesnt magically appear.

atmilkman
03-10-2013, 22:43
Talk to Chris @ ULA
Order two sizes
return the one that you like least.

pretty simple.
Yes it cost you $34 extra shipping
That, or you can sit and wonder

Ive spent literally hundreds of dollars on shipping and return fees ordering and returning items I had no other way to try out.
From socks, to shirts , to packs, to tents.
With ULA being an exception, most of the time you get free shipping and don't pay sales tax so the cost of return shipping is balanced out and all your out really is shipping one way and the time it took to pack it back up. Not that bad a deal to "try things out".

hikerboy57
03-10-2013, 22:43
Talk to Chris @ ULA
Order two sizes
return the one that you like least.

pretty simple.
Yes it cost you $34 extra shipping
That, or you can sit and wonder

Ive spent literally hundreds of dollars on shipping and return fees ordering and returning items I had no other way to try out.
From socks, to shirts , to packs, to tents.
If theres no other way, theres no other way
A solution just doesnt magically appear.but what if i decide i just dont like them, can i send em both back?

hikerboy57
03-10-2013, 22:48
Talk to Chris @ ULA
Order two sizes
return the one that you like least.

pretty simple.
Yes it cost you $34 extra shipping
That, or you can sit and wonder

Ive spent literally hundreds of dollars on shipping and return fees ordering and returning items I had no other way to try out.
From socks, to shirts , to packs, to tents.
If theres no other way, theres no other way
A solution just doesnt magically appear.
actually a solution has just magically appeared. ozjacko fro australia is hiking thru with his son. hes flying through jfk in ny , rent a car and drive down to georgia the next day. im meeting him at kennedy to help him get supplied and hes staying at my place overnight and i just remembered he recently bought the ula, i ll actually be able to check it out this weekend!
magic!

rocketsocks
03-11-2013, 02:16
actually a solution has just magically appeared. ozjacko fro australia is hiking thru with his son. hes flying through jfk in ny , rent a car and drive down to georgia the next day. im meeting him at kennedy to help him get supplied and hes staying at my place overnight and i just remembered he recently bought the ula, i ll actually be able to check it out this weekend!
magic!Schwing.........

JAK
03-11-2013, 03:09
3.5 pounds is almost light enough to keep using it if you have already paid for it.
Thankfully, my mistake was 6 pounds, so it was much easier to replace. :-)

MuddyWaters
03-11-2013, 04:54
but what if i decide i just dont like them, can i send em both back?

I have never had an issue returning anything. Yes you can send them both back.

Cottage vendors realize this is part of doing business with limited/no retail outlets.

Most encourage you to load a pack up, walk around your house or neighborhood ,decide if it will work.

I have never gotten free shipping from ULA, and Ive bought 3 packs from them. They have offered it a Christmas though last yr.


Sounds like youve got a solution though.

TheYoungOne
03-13-2013, 16:06
it depends.. (it always does)For a load up to around 35 lbs you can get packs at around 2 lbs that will do it, for example the ULA Circuit (2.2lbs stripped of some of the extra bits...)
Regularly having loads over 35lbs or so will require (for comfort) a more solid frame , therefore a heavier pack.

This plus you got to look at volume. A 3 1/2 lb pack that can only carry 2400 Cubic inches is way too heavy, while a 3.5lb pack that can carry 4800 cu inches would be considered ultralight.

I have a Kelty Redwing, and it weighs 3.5lb and only has a 3100 cubic inch capacity. I can get lighter with ULA or others, but the redwing is built tough, has good padding, and can carry a real heavy load that would break an ultralight pack. If you are going on a thru and have a light baseweight, go with an ultralight pack. If you hiking a few miles, and carrying a full blow tent, camera gear, and other heavy junk, you need a heavy built pack.

Franco
03-13-2013, 19:24
having said the above about weight, I do have a Circuit and like that for weights up to around 25lbs or so but I really prefer using my Aarn 3.5 lbs pack because I love the balance and I am addicted to the convenience of those front pockets. That is why I do "comfortably" light, not UL or LW...
To put it another way , I also have a sub 1 lbs pack but I much prefer carrying 21 lbs with the Circuit than 20 with that one.
lot more fun and a lot less pain (well no pain really...)

OzJacko
03-13-2013, 19:45
I have a Circuit and a Catalyst and a few older heavier packs.
IF your total weight is within the weight limits quoted by ULA themselves they are excellent packs!
If you carry more than that they are quite frankly painful compared to a heavier pack.
A heavier pack should have better padding, possibly wider straps, and a solider frame to transfer weight better.
To the OP, if your pack fits well with the load you expect to put in it, it will be fine.
I thoroughly recommend ULA packs BUT only within their own recommended weight ranges.
I would suspect the same is true of all lightweight packs.
It's the old story - the pack should be the last piece of gear you look at going lighter on.

Yukon
03-14-2013, 08:17
Is 3-1/2 to 4 pounds considered heavy for a backpack?. I'm talking about just the backpack itself with nothing in it.

Does it feel heavy to you? That's all that matters...

Tinker
03-14-2013, 08:33
My two packs weigh 14 oz. (Golite Dawn, Large) and

21 oz. (if I remember correctly) (Granite Gear Virga)

I use a closed cell foam pad (which lines the inside of the pack - cut width wise to the height of the pack and length wise to the circumference of the pack) for a "frame". This adds 6-8 oz.

I don't carry more than 25 lbs. (though I carried at least 10 more than that when I started the Hundred Mile Wilderness in Maine in my Golite Dawn - it was ridiculously top-heavy for the first two days).

It takes more planning to pack a frameless pack (you can't just throw items into it like you can a pack with a frame), but there are more serious hikers considering it and switching to it every year.

Once you cut your base weight down to reasonable levels and want to cut your total weight more, you might want to consider trying a frameless pack.

If you know someone who carries one, ask to trade off with him/her when you're on a hike and you'll find that a properly packed one does not carry like a "sack of potatoes" as some have said after trying an improperly loaded one or one that uses a pad only against the back, as some manufacturers suggest, supplying a pad pocket for that purpose. How one uses the pad is more important than the pack design or the pad itself.

Note: The Golite Dawn is in the picture at left.

Here's a picture of me and my Golite pack (my Go-Guitar is strapped to the back) at the start of a 5 day hike on the AT in Pa. Yes, my hammock and everything else I need is packed inside (we didn't have any "common" items - many hikers share cookware or shelter. Mariano and Chenango used shelters while I hung my hammock nearby.
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/files/2/5/0/2/dscn0556_thumb.jpg[/URL ([URL]http://whiteblaze.net/forum/vbg/showimage.php?i=49999)]

88BlueGT
03-14-2013, 09:46
I have a ULA Circuit that I carry fully loaded @ 26-28lbs and I could not ask for anything better... carries extremely well. As previously posted, EVERYONE is different, EVERYONE has different shaped shoulders, different hips, different back, etc. I had a friend move from a very expensive, heavily padded, Gregory pack to a ULA and liked it much more. There are obviously going to be people to have something positive/negative to say about every product on the planet. Try it for yourself and see what YOU like.... it's the best way :)

MuddyWaters
03-14-2013, 17:08
I thoroughly recommend ULA packs BUT only within their own recommended weight ranges.
I would suspect the same is true of all lightweight packs.
It's the old story - the pack should be the last piece of gear you look at going lighter on.

Nope. IMO most UL mfgs overstate what their packs can carry. If anything, ULA understates theirs.

I know from experience my Circuit will carry 42lbs OK.
I know from experience another brand UL pack with stay that claimed 35 as a max, sucked above 25.

Anyone, that claims any frameless pack with a light belt will carry 25 lbs comfortably is flat our lying.
Most of the wt will end up on your shoulders after 5 minutes of walking.
Most mfgs list 25 as their max for frameless designs. Yes you can carry it, if you had too. But it is CLEARLY into the realm where a different, heavier pack would be far more comfortable. From personal experience, 15 lbs is where you want to be with frameless, and 20 is where you want a UL pack with stay.

rockymountainhigh
04-02-2013, 01:21
Now 4lb I'd consider to be getting more towards the middle to heavier side of life, 3 1/2lbs. I'd consider in the solid middle of the range.:)

Seconded. Far to many UL packs that dont offer enough

10-K
04-02-2013, 06:17
Too heavy for me... Check out the Gossamer Gear Gorilla. 28 oz for large and all the room you need.

http://gossamergear.com/packs/backpacks/gorilla-ultralight-backpack-all.html

RCBear
04-02-2013, 06:43
HYOH, of course, but my god that's heavy.

Sure. But suspension and shoulder padding doesn't weight that much! Lets be honest, packs get to be over 3 pounds because they either:

1. Are made from the same materials they used a billion years ago for packs (I'm looking at you, WWII ear wax covered canvas rucksack)
2. Are made of a bombproof material that is meant to survive extreme abuse (e.g. military combat) so that pack makers doesn't have abusive users returning them for a warranty replacement.
3. Contain numerous "organization features" (marketing people love these) and compartments for someone that can't bother to learn the skill of packing a pack and keep track of his diddys.
4. Are external frame packs made for carry heavy amounts of mountaineering/climbing gear.

Either way, a weekender or thru hiker or anywhere in between is better served avoiding as many of those traps as possible.

Probably a fine choice, but I'm sure you could be just as comfortable with a lighter option.

Yeah. Wayne Gregory is clearly way off the mark. Several friends, including myself won't carry anything else at this point. I wouldn't trade my Baltoro for anything elsee for trips over 3 days. Anything shorter than that, I go with 1 of my Z packs from him. Both are extremely comfortable, carry my weight extremely well and are as durable as you will find.

Gimme a break dude.

Sent from my Galaxy Note 2 using Tapatalk 2

Namtrag
04-02-2013, 07:24
I am 5'8" and have dieted down to 200lbs. Not sure why people would think a 2 lb pack would make a difference to me vs the 3 1/2 lb Osprey I just bought. Lol. Hell, I lost 25 lbs, so any pack is going to feel lighter to me!

10-K
04-02-2013, 07:34
1.5 lbs doesn't make a difference if you pick one up, set it down, and then pick the other one up and set it down. No big deal...

But, 1.5 extra lbs on your back picked up and set back down 30,000 times in one day makes quite the difference.

It's the same principle as trail runners over boots. Think about how many times you pick your feet up in 1 day of hiking. Now, compare picking up a 1 lb trail runner that many times vs picking up a 2.5 lb boot. It's tons of extra weight your hefting - every day - day in - day out.

Namtrag
04-02-2013, 09:42
Point taken, I guess it depends on your goals, the distances you hike, etc.

In my case, since I can't hike more than 2-3 days anytime in the forseeable future, my Osprey Volt will work fine. Maybe I will change my mind if I ever get to hike a long distance!