PDA

View Full Version : Sending Dehydrated Food in Resupply Paackages



jj442434
05-01-2013, 01:08
I am going to be doing the JMT this August, and am considering buying a dehydrator to make my meals. I will have to send resupply packages two or three weeks before I go pick them up. If I do decide to dehydrate my own food, will this be a problem, what with the packages possibly sitting in a hot truck/store room for weeks before I get them? Will only meats be a problem and vegetables will be fine? Or will everything be OK as long as I prepare it correctly?

fiddlehead
05-01-2013, 07:37
If you prepare it correctly, is a process that takes some experience I believe.
When I dehydrate veggies and meat, I do them differently, depending on when I plan to use them.
I like to dry my veggies and bananas, a little soft. More taste that way and easier to rehydrate.

For meat, I just dry it pretty hard (ground beef is mostly all i dry anymore as far as meat goes), and I've forgot about it in my pack and found it 6 months later and it was still OK.
I had cheese go bad once, but that wasn't dehydrated.

You'll be fine. If in doubt, dry it a little longer than you normally would.
Experience will teach you that drying things too much makes them tough to eat.

Good luck.

mxracer33x
05-09-2013, 12:31
Yes typically it isn't the food that spoils its the oils and greases that do. Your pretty safe under 2 months either way if it is dry. if you leave moisture you leave a place for bacteria and molds to grow. If I am dehydrating full meals (lasagna, spaghetti, chinese food, etc.) I freeze it after I dehydrate it if I wont be using it for a while. I have had no issues this way. Make sure you try everything you make. I have many "recipes" that have taken a couple years to get to where I can just dump the pre dried ingredients in a bag and know I can add 'X' amount of water and it will work out. Ive had a lot of iffy lunches at work due to my experiments. Some were just soupy from to much water, others were just plain inedible. Have fun with it, it definitely pays off.

gunner76
05-09-2013, 12:50
Not an issue. Check out the Hungry Hammock Hanger site by Bablefish5 for lots of great DIY meals you can make and dehydrate. http://www.hungryhammockhanger.com/

FarmerChef
05-09-2013, 13:36
+1 to all of the above. Your dehydrated food should keep for several weeks, if not months, provided it is COMPLETELY SEALED. Do yourself a favor and invest in a vacuum pack machine (Food Saver or, even better, a snorkel type machine). You can use ziploc bags for a period of time that short. Moisture and fungus, not heat or cold, is your enemy.

rustmd
05-09-2013, 13:53
besides my food dehydratory, my Food Saver vacuum sealer is the best thing i ever invested in! took a little bit to get use to using it, such as cutting the plastic down to correct sizes. now my food really is totally sealed.

.com

FarmerChef
05-09-2013, 13:59
+1 to all of the above. Your dehydrated food should keep for several weeks, if not months, provided it is COMPLETELY SEALED. Do yourself a favor and invest in a vacuum pack machine (Food Saver or, even better, a snorkel type machine). You can use ziploc bags for a period of time that short. Moisture and fungus, not heat or cold, is your enemy.

Sorry, let me be more specific on the bags. Ziploc (or similar) FREEZER bags will do for that short. Plastic is still gas permeable and bugs can chew through the thin stuff quite readily.

mxracer33x
05-09-2013, 20:06
Sorry, let me be more specific on the bags. Ziploc (or similar) FREEZER bags will do for that short. Plastic is still gas permeable and bugs can chew through the thin stuff quite readily.
I find the FREEZER bags to have a horrible taste transferred to the food. Some foods worse than others, specifically nuts. Anyone else notice this? I tend to look for thicker "standard" type bags that hold up to my bagging and cooking.

FarmerChef
05-09-2013, 20:44
I find the FREEZER bags to have a horrible taste transferred to the food. Some foods worse than others, specifically nuts. Anyone else notice this? I tend to look for thicker "standard" type bags that hold up to my bagging and cooking.

I haven't noticed but I do notice the smell of the bags when I'm packing for a section. It's very possible I'm just used to it. Seems like a taste test is in order ;)