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Drybones
09-18-2013, 17:02
I believe I'm about to bite the bullet and get a hammock set up, assuming Warbonnet can make it in time. Does anyone use an inflatable sleeping pad in thier hammock? The only way I can use a hammock and not increase my weight is to use my Exped Synmat 7 UL as my bottom layer. This would also allow me to sleep in shelters and on top of balds if needed. I'm looking at a Blackbird 1.1 double hammock and the Z-pack standard hammock cuben tarp and converting the 700 fill down REI bag I have to a top quilt. The bag weighs 35 oz now and I'm assuming I can get it down to 28 ounces modified. With the hammock, tarp, top quilt and pad I'd be at about 4.8 pounds. I'm concerned how the pad would work in a hammock. All comments and suggestions are appreciated.

Tuckahoe
09-18-2013, 17:15
I used a Ridge Rest pad with a 15 sleeping bag this weekend down to 46 at night and I was very comfortable. I hope to go out on a few more colder nights just so I know how cold I can take that, while I save up for an UQ.

Kerosene
09-18-2013, 17:19
I would be exceedingly careful about trying to rely on a standard width sleeping pad as your sole underinsulation. Unless you are one of those fortunate people who doesn't wake up for anything, I think you will find that anywhere your sleeping bag compresses against the bottom/side of the hammock will develop a cold spot that will wake you up. At the very least, you should explore a wider, thin closed cell pad that wraps around your bag. In my opinion, an underquilt is preferable for temperatures below 60 (which is very common at night in the Appalachians any time of year). Of course, that setup will likely exceed your weight threshold. I suggest you go over to www.hammockforums.net (http://www.hammockforums.net) to get advice on how to balance the weight vs. comfort vs. flexibility trade-offs. I ended up with a zPacks tarp for spring/fall outings, which slashes my shelter weight even more, but at the cost of a less comfortable bed.

bangorme
09-18-2013, 17:53
I believe I'm about to bite the bullet and get a hammock set up, assuming Warbonnet can make it in time. Does anyone use an inflatable sleeping pad in thier hammock? The only way I can use a hammock and not increase my weight is to use my Exped Synmat 7 UL as my bottom layer. This would also allow me to sleep in shelters and on top of balds if needed. I'm looking at a Blackbird 1.1 double hammock and the Z-pack standard hammock cuben tarp and converting the 700 fill down REI bag I have to a top quilt. The bag weighs 35 oz now and I'm assuming I can get it down to 28 ounces modified. With the hammock, tarp, top quilt and pad I'd be at about 4.8 pounds. I'm concerned how the pad would work in a hammock. All comments and suggestions are appreciated.

I've never used a hammock, so please excuse my ignorance, but is their draw convenience? Because a one man tent can be under 2 pounds. My assumption was that hammocks would always be cold on the bottom without some insulation added there. I guess my point is that, weight being equal, is there an advantage to a hammock?

Butterfly58
09-18-2013, 18:00
The advantages to a hammock are many, not the least of which is the best night's sleep you'll ever have!!! No sticks, rocks or other pointy things under you. No worry about uneven or sloping ground. The weight may be the same or more than a tent setup but the comfort is worth it in my humble opinion.

Butterfly58
09-18-2013, 18:03
Drybones, I've never used a pad (yet) with my hammock and I have the same one you are considering. However, I know that with the double layer, the use of a pad is easy and it supposedly doesn't move around with you because of the double layer. Hopefully someone who uses them will chime in. I agree that you should go on hammockforums.net and ask anything you want to know. They have been so helpful to me in getting me started with a hammock. I can't imagine ever going back to a tent unless I was forced to because of lack of trees.

kayak karl
09-18-2013, 18:15
i have that pad, but never tried it in the hammock. its thickness and rigidness may be a problem. what temps are you looking for. two closed cell pads may be easier (one got me to 40 and two to 20 degrees). i use the exped pad when kayaking. don't need to walk all the way to trees.

Tuckahoe
09-18-2013, 18:25
http://lawsonequipment.com/InsuLite-Foam-Pads-c127/

I have sorta been eyeing these pads for an alternative to an UQ, and they are a lil wider than standard pads at 24 inches wide and 74 inches long. The 1/4in pad is 8 oz, the 3/8 in pad is 12 oz and the 1/2 in pad is 16 oz.

T.S.Kobzol
09-18-2013, 18:30
I used a pad last winter along with my underquilt.

Drybones
09-18-2013, 18:30
I've never used a hammock, so please excuse my ignorance, but is their draw convenience? Because a one man tent can be under 2 pounds. My assumption was that hammocks would always be cold on the bottom without some insulation added there. I guess my point is that, weight being equal, is there an advantage to a hammock?

The only advantage for me would be comfort, my back causes me to toss and turn all night, I'm looking for a good night's sleep. The only other advantage would be not needing a flat spot to camp...but getting rest is what I'm after.

kayak karl
09-18-2013, 18:35
http://lawsonequipment.com/InsuLite-Foam-Pads-c127/

I have sorta been eyeing these pads for an alternative to an UQ, and they are a lil wider than standard pads at 24 inches wide and 74 inches long. The 1/4in pad is 8 oz, the 3/8 in pad is 12 oz and the 1/2 in pad is 16 oz.

the pad he is thinking of using will take him to zero. those pads will not get you there. also if he wants to go to ground he will need thicker pads,

other post; a pad and a quilt are not a good go to ground combo.

Drybones
09-18-2013, 18:39
i have that pad, but never tried it in the hammock. its thickness and rigidness may be a problem. what temps are you looking for. two closed cell pads may be easier (one got me to 40 and two to 20 degrees). i use the exped pad when kayaking. don't need to walk all the way to trees.

I can sleep cozy at 15* with my current tent and bag set up, I'd like to maintain that if possible without adding a lot of bulk to my pack...don't know if that's possible, my gut feel is that I'd have to add weight to get down below maybe 30*.

johnnybgood
09-18-2013, 18:52
For temps above 40 degrees I use a thermorest pad as down insulation. Use of a spandex binder helps keep the pad from sliding out from underneath. Mine is a no frills system which works for me

I always bring a fleece top and a polyester vest for more warmth if need be.

Ideally an under quilt would be best option for shoulder season and winter hanging.
As I buy one piece of gear at a time, layering has gotten me through to the mid thirties at night.

kayak karl
09-18-2013, 18:54
I can sleep cozy at 15* with my current tent and bag set up, I'd like to maintain that if possible without adding a lot of bulk to my pack...don't know if that's possible, my gut feel is that I'd have to add weight to get down below maybe 30*.
if you want the ground and hang options, then yes you will need to add weight, but just hanging you could match weight with an underquilt.

lostagain
09-18-2013, 19:45
+1 on the sugggestions to go over to hammockforum.net. Also check out Shug's videos on YouTube. He's under Shugmery. Lots of great videos on hammocking in the cold. Guy lives in Minnesotta and most of his videos are done in the snow. If you truly want the go to ground option, you'll need the UL7. Normally, some form of UQ + TQ gets you down to - temps. Of course, that also requires appropriate layers as well. Ove on HF you can also learn how to DIY a poncho liner UQ. Really the deal to keeping warm in a hammock is to block out the wind and cold form below which you don't really have in a tent.

The biggest problem with any pad is keeping on top of it while you sleep. they can move around a bit under you as you sleep.

Nooga
09-18-2013, 20:02
I believe I'm about to bite the bullet and get a hammock set up, assuming Warbonnet can make it in time. Does anyone use an inflatable sleeping pad in thier hammock? The only way I can use a hammock and not increase my weight is to use my Exped Synmat 7 UL as my bottom layer. This would also allow me to sleep in shelters and on top of balds if needed. I'm looking at a Blackbird 1.1 double hammock and the Z-pack standard hammock cuben tarp and converting the 700 fill down REI bag I have to a top quilt. The bag weighs 35 oz now and I'm assuming I can get it down to 28 ounces modified. With the hammock, tarp, top quilt and pad I'd be at about 4.8 pounds. I'm concerned how the pad would work in a hammock. All comments and suggestions are appreciated.

I would think that you could partially inflatate the Exped and insert it between the double layer, which would restrain the pad. I have used pads in my Hennessy and the pad would shift around and if I got up in the middle of the night, it took time to reposition. I plan to purchase a double layer Warbonnet for that reason.

Nooga
09-18-2013, 20:09
I've never used a hammock, so please excuse my ignorance, but is their draw convenience? Because a one man tent can be under 2 pounds. My assumption was that hammocks would always be cold on the bottom without some insulation added there. I guess my point is that, weight being equal, is there an advantage to a hammock?

IMO, Hammock advantages: great nights sleep, setup / break down in the rain, area to cook under if raining.
Disadvantages: To me it is a weight penalty. I cannot match my tent (22oz) + Neoair (11oz) with my hammock. To me some weight penalty is worth it. I guess, each would have to decide how much extra weight. If don't have a pad, it makes coming to the ground (shelter) a hard night sleep. I know many use them in cold weather, but I am a cold sleeper, so for me it is on a 1.5 season shelter.

Wise Old Owl
09-18-2013, 20:27
I used a pad last winter along with my underquilt.


I like this answer most... Thermarest not self inflating... uber light down to about 45 degrees and good wind blocker.. any colder and you wish you had taken a underquilt.

ezdoesit
09-18-2013, 20:36
The advantages to a hammock are many, not the least of which is the best night's sleep you'll ever have!!! No sticks, rocks or other pointy things under you. No worry about uneven or sloping ground. The weight may be the same or more than a tent setup but the comfort is worth it in my humble opinion.

+1 I totally agree with the comfort-:)

russb
09-18-2013, 20:44
Pads can work. I use one myself especially in the serious cold of the Adirondack winters. However, I noticed you (et al) have warbonnets. I have noticed that many warbonnet users do not care for using a pad in their hammock. I believe that pads seem to work better in some hammocks vs others, and warbonnet isn't one of them. That said, the warbonnet users LOVE their hammock, just not with a pad. YMMV

russb
09-18-2013, 20:48
I like this answer most... Thermarest not self inflating... uber light down to about 45 degrees and good wind blocker.. any colder and you wish you had taken a underquilt.


I disagree. When it get real cold I ditch the UQ and go with more pads. Use them exclusively in subzero F with significant wind.

kayak karl
09-18-2013, 20:50
I disagree. When it get real cold I ditch the UQ and go with more pads. Use them exclusively in subzero F with significant wind.
how many pads do you carry for sub zero?

Lone Wolf
09-18-2013, 20:57
pads are for hard surfaces. why would one need one for a hammock? makes no sense

russb
09-18-2013, 21:36
how many pads do you carry for sub zero?

Three. A wide walmart waffle. A 3/8in full length. And a section of a 3/8 turned sideways for shoulder to hip. Add a piece of relfectix for sub -neg 20.

russb
09-18-2013, 21:37
pads are for hard surfaces. why would one need one for a hammock? makes no sense

Insulation.

kayak karl
09-18-2013, 21:51
Three. A wide walmart waffle. A 3/8in full length. And a section of a 3/8 turned sideways for shoulder to hip. Add a piece of relfectix for sub -neg 20. how big is your pack :)

russb
09-18-2013, 22:03
how big is your pack :)

Not very large. I use a GG Mariposa. The 2 longer pads don't go inside it. They are bulky for sure, but rather light (34 oz total) and keep me extremely warm.

WalksInDark
09-18-2013, 22:25
I have used the EXPED 7 DL DAM (down feather filled air mattress) repeatedly in my single layer Hennessey hammock. Lowest air temp in the Hennessey was around 30 degrees...with a 0 degree rated MontBell sleeping bag. In my Hennessey I occasionally have slipped off of the pad. Labor day weekend, I used the same pad and bag combo on a double layer hammock and am happy to report that I never even came close to going off of the pad.

In terms of the EXPED DAM, I have slept in a tent (with a floor) pitched upon snow greater than 12" when air temps got into the -15 degree range..using the same 0 degree bag...but wearing a wool cap, fleece jacket, and fleece pants...and was quite comfortably warm.

WalksInDark
09-18-2013, 22:26
Almost forgot to add: using a full size air mattress in most single layer hammocks really eats up the interior space and may put your face uncomfortably close to the ridge line and/or noseeum mesh.

broken arrow
09-19-2013, 05:18
i just finished my A.T. thru and used a hammock with a z-fold and a 15 degree down bag the whole way. was never cold nor wet (except the couple times i was hung up on top of a mountain where the clouds saturated everything). you'll be fine w/a pad... even use reflectics if you want under the pad for extra insulation, but it can get sweaty then.

scooterdogma
09-19-2013, 06:48
I use a Thermarest Womens Prolite and a 3/4 Orca synthetic underquilt. I have a Warbonnet single layer and a WM bag. On really cold nights, read low teens, I put the Prolite in the bag with me, absolutely no slip sliding away. The Orca adds side warmth and wind protection and damp, foggy nights does not effect it's insulation value. I carry both because I like the option of sleeping in the shelter sometimes. The Orca is good down into the 40's, with the addition of the Prolite I can hang in teens and be cozy warm. Good luck with your choices and it is good advice to check out Hammock Forums.

Wise Old Owl
09-19-2013, 07:56
Three. A wide walmart waffle. A 3/8in full length. And a section of a 3/8 turned sideways for shoulder to hip. Add a piece of relfectix for sub -neg 20.


It was good up to the 32 ounce part... you are carting two pounds of waffle. but if that works for you, awesome... I gave up on winter a while back. I take my 3/4 underquilt to exstend the seasons - I sleep cold.

Nooga
09-19-2013, 08:45
Will a Neoair partially inflated fit between the double layers of a Warbonnet hammock? In that situation, would the partially inflated Neoair provide very much insulation?

perdidochas
09-19-2013, 10:36
I've never used a hammock, so please excuse my ignorance, but is their draw convenience? Because a one man tent can be under 2 pounds. My assumption was that hammocks would always be cold on the bottom without some insulation added there. I guess my point is that, weight being equal, is there an advantage to a hammock?
If you don't sleep well on the ground, the extra sleep you get from the comfort of a hammock is worth it. In addition, you can camp wherever you have two trees 12 ft apart or so. You can camp on the side of a hill, for example.

perdidochas
09-19-2013, 10:38
pads are for hard surfaces. why would one need one for a hammock? makes no sense

Just like for hard surfaces--insulation from what's below you.

bangorme
09-19-2013, 11:07
If you don't sleep well on the ground, the extra sleep you get from the comfort of a hammock is worth it. In addition, you can camp wherever you have two trees 12 ft apart or so. You can camp on the side of a hill, for example.

I don't want to hijack this thread, so I'm trying to stay out of it. I see some of the advantages now. However, I'm trying to picture myself sleeping on my side in one of these things... ouch! The spine bends forward really well, but sideways not so well.

I don't have a problem sleeping on the ground on my LLBean Pathfinder self-inflating pad. It's also very warm. I'm really enjoying this thread because this hammock thing sounds like more weight, colder nights, not sure how you read in those things in the rain, and all the hassles you are all going through. They must be a blast in the wind though. Like being in a small boat in big waves. Must rock you to sleep!

pettas
09-19-2013, 11:17
I've just started my journey back into hammock camping but found that when I was lying directly on top of the pad I would slide off at some point during the night and end up with cold spots. The "fix" to my problem was to purchase a Big Agnes down bag (rated to 15 degrees) so I could slide my pad into the pocket on the bag. While I haven't used it in very cold weather yet I'm pretty sure I'll be OK down into the mid 30s at least; although I do sleep very warm without too much need for long underwear, etc. The pad I use is an old ultra light ThermaRest and I also did this so I'd have some flexibility with being able to sleep in the hammock, in a shelter or on the ground based on what I found each night along the trail.

Best of luck in finding what works best for your needs. I think you can find a system that will work for you and still have the flexibility a pad allows.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...Be well.

snapper

Theosus
09-19-2013, 15:05
I don't want to hijack this thread, so I'm trying to stay out of it. I see some of the advantages now. However, I'm trying to picture myself sleeping on my side in one of these things... ouch! The spine bends forward really well, but sideways not so well.


If your spine is bent badly you arent sleeping right. You sleep across the hammock at a slight angle , and you lay flatter. I sleep on my side in a hennessy just fine, although I'm thinking about buying the longer one (im 6'02).

Some asked "whats the draw? I can get a sub 2-pound tent".

You have to weigh everything for one... weight your entire tent setup, sleeping pad, bag, etc. then comapre it to the entire hammock setup, including underquilt and top quilt, and see if it's the same. My old sleeping bag and borrowed pad were over four pounds. My quilt set (which means no pad) are less, and feel better. Then there's comfort. I'll carry a half pound for comfort and security. On my last newbie group hike, all the tenters got wet in some way when it rained all night. My hammock stayed dry. Also, when the bear rips through our camp, the tenters get dragged out of the side. I get to fall on the bear, which may help scare him off, plus, with a quilt set, I'm not trapped in the bag when he tries to eat me.

bangorme
09-19-2013, 15:14
... Also, when the bear rips through our camp, the tenters get dragged out of the side. I get to fall on the bear, which may help scare him off, plus, with a quilt set, I'm not trapped in the bag when he tries to eat me.

Does the word pinata mean anything to you? That's how I'd feel zippered up in a swinging cocoon like that! I don't feel like becoming bear candy! ;)

I'm just kidding you. Bear safety is the last thing I worry about (on the AT that is).

Tuckahoe
09-19-2013, 16:32
I've never used a hammock, so please excuse my ignorance, but is their draw convenience? Because a one man tent can be under 2 pounds. My assumption was that hammocks would always be cold on the bottom without some insulation added there. I guess my point is that, weight being equal, is there an advantage to a hammock?

I am new to hammocks and admittedly there are more experienced folks can answer this question more effectively than myself. But for me the single most important benefit of the hammock was sleeping comfort.

We all can tolerate a certain level of discomfort, but for myself I have been finding that it was getting much more difficult sleeping on the ground for multiple days. I needed a couple days after any sort of trip to recover, not from the physical activity, but from the lack of any real sleep.


Because a one man tent can be under 2 pounds.

The weight of one's shelter in the end will always depend on what they choose to use and while tents can certainly come in at under 2 pounds, a hammock set up can as well.

However, not everyone uses a sub 2 pound tent. I switched from using a Lightheart Gear Solo tent with a listed weight of 27 ounces. Then there was the addition of seam sealing, tent pegs, poles, and a foot print and the whole set up came in for a total of 48 ounces.

My hammock and tarp setup, including spreader bars, seam sealing, guylines, pegs, and carabiners comes in at 60 ounces.

For me, that 12 ounce additional weight is well worth it, and I have been able to drop that additional weight from other parts of my kit.

I could certainly get a lighter hammock set up but there were certain things that I wanted. I knew I wanted a bridge hammock because I wanted to just lay flat and straight and I knew a gathered end hammock was not for me. I also wanted a large tarp and got one with a 12' ridge line.

If the magic number of two pounds is important, it is easy to achieve. One option would be Warbonnet's Traveler single layer hammock at 16.5 ounces (http://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/travelers.php) and their Edge tarp at 11.25 ounces (http://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/tarps.php) for a listed weight of 27.75 ounces. A quarter pound under the 2 pound mark, and the same listed weight as the Lightheart Gear Solo.

Additionally a Traveler hammock and Edge tarp combo, would cost $145. How many sub 2 pound tents cost less than $200?


My assumption was that hammocks would always be cold on the bottom without some insulation added there.

My take on the subject is that there will always be the necessity to have insulation underneath, regardless if one is sleeping on the ground or in a hammock. Pads, air mattresses, and underquilts all are used for the same reason and what one has to understand is heat loss through either convection or conduction.


I'm... not sure how you read in those things in the rain, and all the hassles you are all going through.

Its really not a hassle though. I have more space under my 12' by 10' tarp, than I did in my tent. I can relax comfortably in the hammock and read if its raining and I can sit in a manner using the hammock as a sling chair. Another benefit of the hammock is that I can set it up anywhere. I dont have to worry about the slope of the ground or large rocks underneath. I dont need the flatest ground.

This is a picture of my set up from this last weekend.
24118


They must be a blast in the wind though. Like being in a small boat in big waves. Must rock you to sleep!

Oh yes indeed. There is something very soothing and relaxing about the gentle swaying rocking you to sleep.

And finally this Youtube video really had an impact on me. How many tents could have offered the ability to view the beauty of a storm like this?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsICgcSzfmo&feature=youtube_gdata_player

perdidochas
09-19-2013, 16:59
I don't want to hijack this thread, so I'm trying to stay out of it. I see some of the advantages now. However, I'm trying to picture myself sleeping on my side in one of these things... ouch! The spine bends forward really well, but sideways not so well.

I don't have a problem sleeping on the ground on my LLBean Pathfinder self-inflating pad. It's also very warm. I'm really enjoying this thread because this hammock thing sounds like more weight, colder nights, not sure how you read in those things in the rain, and all the hassles you are all going through. They must be a blast in the wind though. Like being in a small boat in big waves. Must rock you to sleep!

In a hammock, you generally sleep at an angle, which makes the cloth below you pretty much flat. I'm a side sleeper, and I have no problem in a hammock. Nights are cooler, but I'm in FL, so that's a good thing most of the time. 72 degrees is almost cold in a hammock without insulation. Reading is no problem in the rain or otherwise. I actually prefer to hammock in the rain over sleeping in a backpacking style tent in the rain. It's much drier to get into.

bangorme
09-19-2013, 17:58
This is a picture of my set up from this last weekend.
24118



That's a neat video. As far as your hammock outfit, that's something I'd have to see in action I guess to really appreciate it. It looks fairly complicated to me. I do now see a few advantages. You could cook under your tarp safely. You could set up on ground I couldn't ever put a tent on. You could setup over a platform (assuming there are trees) where one couldn't without a freestanding tent.

I'll need to really look at one on the trail I guess before I pass judgement.

russb
09-19-2013, 18:12
It was good up to the 32 ounce part... you are carting two pounds of waffle. but if that works for you, awesome... I gave up on winter a while back. I take my 3/4 underquilt to exstend the seasons - I sleep cold.

I still love the winter. For subzero, 32 ounces isn't that much. Staying warm at Negative 20 isn't a lightweight endeavor no matter how what gear one uses.

I have 2/3 UQ I use in summer, and another one I use in on the edges of summer, but I start to add pads as the seasons change to fall/spring. Once the dead of winter hits, it is all pads as the weight/warmth ratio for the ccf vs UQuilts is better in those extreme temps. Although the volume of ccf sucks.

Drybones
09-19-2013, 19:26
I use a Thermarest Womens Prolite and a 3/4 Orca synthetic underquilt. I have a Warbonnet single layer and a WM bag. On really cold nights, read low teens, I put the Prolite in the bag with me, absolutely no slip sliding away. The Orca adds side warmth and wind protection and damp, foggy nights does not effect it's insulation value. I carry both because I like the option of sleeping in the shelter sometimes. The Orca is good down into the 40's, with the addition of the Prolite I can hang in teens and be cozy warm. Good luck with your choices and it is good advice to check out Hammock Forums.

Never thought about putting the pad inside the sleeping bag...makes sense.

No Directions
09-19-2013, 19:30
I use a Big Agnes insulated pad in a BA sleeping bag. For those that aren't familiar with BA their bags have a sleeve for the pad. This prevents the pad from moving around and keeps me on the pad. I also use a short length of blue CSF for the shoulder area. So far I have slept comfortably but I have not tried this setup in temperatures lower than the upper 50's.

No Directions
09-19-2013, 19:31
Oops. That should be CCF.

winger
09-20-2013, 09:12
After 6 years of hammocking, and trying lots of different gear, I never found a pad to offer anything more than an UQ. It might supplement the heat retention from an UQ , but the bulk and weight are disadvantages for me. However, if one is planning, or needing to 'go to ground' then having a pad would be welcomed.
I had wished that was the case when I was hammocking at Grayson Highlands when it was 15 degrees and a blizzard blew in, 6 inches of snow by the next morning. Spent the night fighting hypothermia. Seriously wished I had been in my Scarp 1.
Make sure your UQ is attached properly, too loose and you'll have noticeable drafts of cold air.
There are several good quilt makers that specialize in hammock gear/needs, and I'd recommend going for the best that you can afford for good quality quilts.
BTW, the very packable emergency type blankets work well, instead of a pad, in a double layer hammock like the Warbonnet Blackbird.

AngryGerman
09-20-2013, 10:26
I too put my Thermarest Ridgerest (cut down to 50") inside my 40* UL summer bag while hanging in the hammock; this setup works for me down into the 30*'s. When it is in the 20*'s regularly, I switch out to a zero degree UL bag while still utilizing the Ridgerest or I use my short Prolite inflated 1/2 way; this setup has worked for me in 0* temps on a regular basis. With that being said, I am a very hot sleeper, usually I can't zip up the bag at all unless it is around zero, and then I have to keep the foot box open for ventilation so I don't wake up with a bag that's wet at the bottom in the morning, or frozen! Good luck OP with your vast array of choices that lie ahead of you. As stated before, check out Shugemery on YouTube as well as pick up some literature ("The Ultimate Hang") on hammock hanging; best thing you can do for yourself, period.

Theosus
09-23-2013, 22:18
Does the word pinata mean anything to you? That's how I'd feel zippered up in a swinging cocoon like that! I don't feel like becoming bear candy! ;)

I'm just kidding you. Bear safety is the last thing I worry about (on the AT that is).

Since my hammock is made of the same material as any other tent, I feel as safe in a hammock as I would on the ground. Hammocks can be called "bear pinatas", but tents are "Bear Hot Pockets" (since they rip open the top and sides before dragging you out).

baumfamily
10-10-2013, 07:37
Went camping a few weeks ago and was cold due to wind blowing under my tarp and around the hammock. After coming back I tried different setups to eliminate this such as pitching my tarp lower to cut down on the wind and working with my UQ setup. I was able to improve the problem but was still cold on my sides. I just bought a double wide mat from Oware ( shipping was free) that fits nicely in my double layer Blackbird. I must say it did cut down on the air flow and I slept nice and warm the other night. Going to give it a couple more tries just to be sure. The pad will serve a dual purpose, inserted in my hammock or in case I ever had to sleep in a shelter while hiking.

Gambit McCrae
10-10-2013, 08:37
Ive tried a thermorest in a eno and both made me look like a dummy as the pad wants to pop out all night

Likeapuma
10-10-2013, 08:49
I actually just purchased a cheap CCF pad to help bring my under quilt even lower. I was nervous after hearing how pads aren't as comfortable, but I had no problem getting comfortable.

A double layer hammock may help keep your pad in place

Wise Old Owl
10-10-2013, 08:54
I am a side sleeper - tosser.... and yes I use a sleeping REI down bag 1/2 zipped - unless its really cold and I sink in and zip it up.

Deadeye
10-11-2013, 01:25
I use a Thermarest Prolite (shorty, 42" I think) or my Big Agnes Insulated Air Core pad (also the short version, but longer than the Prolite) in my hammock. Both work fine. I haven't converted to an underquilt yet, and may not bother, since the pad works fine, and gives me the option of sleeping on the ground. I don't have issues with the pad moving around... once I'm asleep, I don't move.

ChuckT
10-11-2013, 06:34
I have just bought a Blackbird double layer and have the same dilema as you. 67 year old back with A, and I'm looking forward to being a grounder again.

Got an old inflatable Thermorest inflatable but that looks too narrow and it occured to me to wonder what that valve will do to the hammock material. Looked at a Walmart blue ccf pad. Kinda heavy and bulky. The thinner "ensolite" pads may be an option _if_ they don't slip and slide and I could find one wide enough. For the moment I'm modding a light fleece blanket to go between the double layers. Fleece can be a sponge, of course, but then so could a Down Under Quilt. Synthetic fill is probably the most "practical" solution (what ever that is). All in all the jury is still out for me.
Cvt

ChuckT
10-11-2013, 06:44
Hmm - that should have said "NOT" looking forward to being a grounder again.

Cvt

ChuckT
10-11-2013, 06:46
?.. just bought a double wide mat from Oware ( shipping was free) that fits nicely in my double layer Blackbird. I must say it did cut down on the air flow and I slept nice and warm the other night. Going to give it a couple more tries just to be sure. The pad will serve a dual purpose, inserted in my hammock or in case I ever had to sleep in a shelter while hiking.. Can you post URL? And details?

Cvt

ChuckT
10-11-2013, 07:01
I found bivysack.com; Oware Foam Sleeping Pads 3/16 (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/x-apple-data-detectors://1)" Thick 4 sizes including long and double wide
Perfect for in hammocks for insulation that wraps around your sides and insulates you from the hammock fabric. R value .99 for 3/16 (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/x-apple-data-detectors://2)" thick. Closed cell foam, waterproof to 3500 mm.
Free shipping. Lighter than Evazote for the warmth.
Torso, Narrow 19x40" --2.75 oz.
One Person, Long 20x76" -- 5.25 oz.
Two Person, Long 40x76" -- 10.5 oz.
Price $14.50

Is that it?
Cvt

flemdawg1
10-11-2013, 18:38
I use a Thermarest Prolite (shorty, 42" I think) or my Big Agnes Insulated Air Core pad (also the short version, but longer than the Prolite) in my hammock. Both work fine. I haven't converted to an underquilt yet, and may not bother, since the pad works fine, and gives me the option of sleeping on the ground. I don't have issues with the pad moving around... once I'm asleep, I don't move.

I use the same (TR not BA), and it works fine for both.

weinrich
10-13-2013, 21:40
i have that pad, but never tried it in the hammock.

Just Bill
10-14-2013, 12:11
Not sure if it was mentioned already, sorry if it has.

Shug's video and others I have talked to mentioned using your self inflator (or neo-air) and letting a good portion of the air out to improve your chances of staying on it. CCF, especially with the Speer shoulder and hip wings, seems to be the best in a hammock, but not so good if you choose to go to ground.

Try your pad at half flaccid; Like any hammock it's easier to keep your banana inside if it's not rock hard.

Toothless
10-17-2013, 20:32
I use a Spear hammock with a Big Agnes insulated mattress (not fully inflated) and find it to be very comfortable and warm. Hope that helps.

tactfree
03-06-2015, 15:46
I found bivysack.com; Oware Foam Sleeping Pads 3/16 (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/x-apple-data-detectors://1)" Thick 4 sizes including long and double wide
Perfect for in hammocks for insulation that wraps around your sides and insulates you from the hammock fabric. R value .99 for 3/16 (http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/x-apple-data-detectors://2)" thick. Closed cell foam, waterproof to 3500 mm.
Free shipping. Lighter than Evazote for the warmth.


I just purchased the 3/16" Oware double wide to try this out in my hammock. I received the pad a couple of days ago and want to try custom fitting it for me to try and wrap part of it around me - and cutting off the excess. However, I didn't think about how wide it actually is and how to carry it while backpacking. I contacted Oware but have not received a reply yet to know if I can fold it over length-wise before rolling it up to make it manageable. Otherwise it's TOO wide to carry horizontally on your pack - and it's really awkward to mount it vertically. Not sure if folding it will damage it.

Migrating Bird
03-06-2015, 19:22
I used this 1/4" pad, in my WBBB 1.1dbl. http://gossamergear.com/sleeping/thinlight-insulation-pads.html It is wide and can be trimmed to fit. High 20's with an my 30 degree underquilt, have not tried it on its own.