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Felix
08-17-2005, 16:21
How do you maintain a sanitary environment around the threads of your water bottle when you collect the water? It seems to me that the mouth of the bottle would never end up getting cleaned by the bleach/iodine/aqua mira/etc., which in turn seems to defeat the purpose of treating the water in the first place. Do you just dunk your bottles, give the mouths a wipe with a bandana, and then whisper a quiet prayer for God to kill the giardia that never quite made it into (only onto) the bottle? I'm toying with using bleach instead of a filter, because the filter is heavy-ish and a pain.

Lanthar Mandragoran
08-17-2005, 16:26
If you're really worried about it, smear a drop around the threads.

tlbj6142
08-17-2005, 16:26
After allowing the treatment to finish, or after filtering the water into the bottle, simply turn the bottle over and open the lid slightly and allow "clean" water to flush the threads clean.

Footslogger
08-17-2005, 16:43
Years ago when I used PolarPur I would slosh the treated water around with the cap on the bottle loosely tightened.

Since I started using AquaMira I abandoned that practice. With very few exceptions, I don't collect water with the container from which I drink. I do carry a 20 oz gatorade bottle and sometimes during the day will dip it in a stream and then treat it, without paying any attention to the threads at the top.

Maybe I'm living on the edge but my I haven't had any problems to date.

'Slogger

Kerosene
08-17-2005, 19:31
I do as tlbj6142 does.

dream
08-17-2005, 19:44
After allowing the treatment to finish, or after filtering the water into the bottle, simply turn the bottle over and open the lid slightly and allow "clean" water to flush the threads clean. Actually I would do it right after adding the treatment not after allowing the treatment to finish. Give the container a few shakes to mix the treatment and then flush the cap. Unscrew the cap slowly while gently squezzing until some water comes out underneath the threads of the cap. I say do this BEFORE waiting for the treatment to finish (NOT after) so that the chemical has a chance to act on the threads of the cap as well. Also I realize that I am splitting hairs here but this is safest way.

Felix
08-17-2005, 21:10
Great, thanks everyone. I guess I'll be loosening my cap as well, then.

I think Dream has a good point, too. I seem to recollect that some additives stopped working after a given time, so sloshing the water around after the suggested time to disinfect has gone by might be simply sloshing around water that lacks the ability to cleanse.

neo
08-17-2005, 22:25
After allowing the treatment to finish, or after filtering the water into the bottle, simply turn the bottle over and open the lid slightly and allow "clean" water to flush the threads clean.

thats the same method i use:cool: neo

C'est La Vie
08-17-2005, 23:27
I do the same as Dream. The treated water has to displace the raw water in the cap/thread area.

Ender
08-18-2005, 13:03
I usually use the swishing method just liek everyone else, but if you're already carrying Purell, that works to clean it up too. Just FYI

DLFrost
08-20-2005, 01:09
How do you maintain a sanitary environment around the threads of your water bottle when you collect the water? It seems to me that the mouth of the bottle would never end up getting cleaned by the bleach/iodine/aqua mira/etc., which in turn seems to defeat the purpose of treating the water in the first place.
Something you have to keep in mind here is that it takes more than one nasty bug to start trouble. Usually there have to be so many per ounce to overwhelm your natural defenses. You might ask the same question about the dishes in your house--a small quanity of bacteria has grown on them by the time you take them out for the next meal, but it's not enough to cause any problems.

I've taken to using ziploc bags to gather water, after which I can sit down someplace more comfortable (than a damp streamside rock) and filter away. Fill 2-3 gallon bags 3/4ths full, zip em tight, and put em in a spare stuffsack for conviant carry back to camp/table. Cross-contamination is much less likely this way as well.

Doug Frost

V8
09-02-2005, 13:56
A couple of plastic grocery sacks will do,(one inside the other) just to bring water to a more convenient place to filter or treat. Or not.

Bassline
09-02-2005, 14:35
I use Aqua Mira, and I dont worry about the cap. I have done this several hundred times, and I have never been sick.

Big Dawg
09-02-2005, 22:38
I use Aqua Mira, and I dont worry about the cap. I have done this several hundred times, and I have never been sick.
What do you mean, "don't worry about the cap"?

Whistler
09-03-2005, 00:03
What do you mean, "don't worry about the cap"?I'm guessing he means he doesn't worry about contaminated bottle/cap threads. I used to flush the threads, too, then stopped worrying about it. No harm done.
-Mark

Bassline
09-03-2005, 00:25
I'm guessing he means he doesn't worry about contaminated bottle/cap threads. I used to flush the threads, too, then stopped worrying about it. No harm done.
-Mark
Exactly. Thanks Whistler!!!

The Hog
09-03-2005, 07:00
Bleach is unfortunately ineffective against cryptosporidium. In fact, there is evidence that chlorine can actually help cryptosporidium emerge from cysts.

chowhound
09-06-2005, 13:27
I'm guessing he means he doesn't worry about contaminated bottle/cap threads. I used to flush the threads, too, then stopped worrying about it. No harm done.
-Mark

I would flush the threads. I got giardia while using aqua mira along the Superior Hiking Trail in Minnesota. I don't know of any obvious mistakes that I made, but contaminated threads is one possibility. I'm not down on aqua mira, but the next time I use it I will be much more carefull to avoid contamination. I will also increase the dose a little bit, especially when getting water from beaver ponds.