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squeezebox
10-19-2013, 10:35
How long will summer sausage last unrefrigerated in the summer?
Would vacuum packing them increase shelf /pack life?

MuddyWaters
10-19-2013, 15:02
Cured meats were invented thousands of years ago, long before refrigeration, out of necessity to preserve meat.
They generally come vacuum sealed. They will last as long as it takes you to eat them from the time you open them.
Several smaller ones that are vacuum sealed, are better than one giant one.

Cheese pretty much lasts the same way.

lush242000
10-19-2013, 20:30
After opening....I would throw it out in a week.


Sent from somewhere.

Grinder
10-20-2013, 09:35
I carry 1/2 lb in each weeks food supply. the resupply is packed at least a month ahead of the hike start date. I have had no problems.


the sausage does get greasy and ugly towards the end of the week, but I`ve never been sick from eating it and it tastes fine.

PS the cheddar cheese gets even uglier and also has caused no problems.

Bronk
10-20-2013, 10:34
Its like a bag of doritos or a bottle of tequila...once its open its usually gone pretty quick.

Just Bill
10-20-2013, 10:40
unopened- longer than you need to worry about (hence the name summer in the title of said sausage). Opened- a week is a good guideline, but a good practice is to slice the outer (plastic) wrapper, slide the sausage out, cut a hunk off, and slide it back into the outer wrapper cut side first to reduce oxidation. If you get a little of the funk, it will only be skin deep, just slice a 1/4 inch off and go back to work.

Rasty
10-20-2013, 11:01
Much of the commercial summer sausage needs to be refrigerated or eaten soon after opening because the moisture content is higher and the sodium nitrite level is lower then traditional recipes. The dryer cured sausage like soppresatta will last months because of lower moisture, lower ph and specific cultures that assist in shelf life.

Another Kevin
10-20-2013, 23:28
Much of the commercial summer sausage needs to be refrigerated or eaten soon after opening because the moisture content is higher and the sodium nitrite level is lower then traditional recipes. The dryer cured sausage like soppresatta will last months because of lower moisture, lower ph and specific cultures that assist in shelf life.

Good, so I'm not going far astray when I bring abruzzese autentica. Along with Romano cheese, dehydrated tomato sauce (my own!), dried porcini, and cappellini. I might be a philistine when it comes to barbecue, but Italian I can do.

Rasty
10-20-2013, 23:36
Good, so I'm not going far astray when I bring abruzzese autentica. Along with Romano cheese, dehydrated tomato sauce (my own!), dried porcini, and cappellini. I might be a philistine when it comes to barbecue, but Italian I can do.

You doing an excellent job. I've never been a master of any one cuisine because the work I do requires a broader knowledge base but italian is my favorite. Japanese is also my favorite. French is also. So is Spanish and

4Bears
10-20-2013, 23:37
Old Wisconsin brand sells a "Hunter's Sausage" they are about the size of a skinny hot dog, each being about a serving for lunch. They are unwrapped and unsealed, and probably have the shelf life of a twinkie, sold in a self serve container at "C" stores for about 50 cents each. I find them quite convenient for day hikes and for a longer week in the woods. Cut them up and eat with some cheese or whatever you like, or gnaw on them.

mrcoffeect
10-21-2013, 19:30
The dryer cured sausage like soppresatta will last months because of lower moisture, lower ph and specific cultures that assist in shelf life.

Love the sopprestta. I get mine over the border in Rhode island at an italian deli, those guys just call it soupy for short.
they make sweet, mild, hot, xx hot and xxx hot. I always go for the xxxhot.

Wise Old Owl
10-21-2013, 19:47
After opening....I would throw it out in a week.


Sent from somewhere.

Honesty? I have left Hikers companion soft thuringer in my pack half consuumed and I ate the rest 6 Months later... no worries! UNREFRIGERATED.

Wise Old Owl
10-21-2013, 19:53
Part of the "secret" is Saltpeter - Morton's Sugar cure is used to cure meat by killing the bacteria that causes change. a very tiny amount is added to the burger and it removes all the bacteria in the meat...

Since then modern methods include pure carbon monoxide. A gas so after treatment - its gone...there's the rub,,, is it safe?... yup but there was back lash...
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/food/2007-10-30-kalsec-meat-carbon-monoxide_N.htm

annamagpie
10-22-2013, 12:09
We lost electricity recently for 5 days. the breakfast sausage I'd been eating was unrefrigerated and the house was still in the 50s and I ate it all 5 days without mishap. so I'm not afraid of summer sausage anymore. my grandma in south Georgia (it's hot down there) used to leave food out in before they had a refrigerator and it was ok. of course it got eaten pretty quickly because it was a large farm family. I think we worry a bit too much about leaving food out. someone sent a link to me from the Food Safety Admin telling which foods to throw away after an electrical outage. Two of the things on this list were eggs and tinned hams. give me a break. I mean decide for yourself what to do, but for me--summer sausage is going in my pack ! (and I love the dancing banana:banana:banana:banana so here it is

Namtrag
10-22-2013, 12:58
My redneck relatives made a believer of me a few years back at a family reunion. We had a cookout in mid-afternoon. The leftover burgers and hot dogs were taken back to the hotel. At 10pm I went to play poker in my relatives room and they were eating the leftovers, and they had been on the table all evening, unrefrigerated.

I still won't do that, but I do think it shows we get a little carried away.

aficion
10-22-2013, 13:09
My redneck relatives made a believer of me a few years back at a family reunion. We had a cookout in mid-afternoon. The leftover burgers and hot dogs were taken back to the hotel. At 10pm I went to play poker in my relatives room and they were eating the leftovers, and they had been on the table all evening, unrefrigerated.

I still won't do that, but I do think it shows we get a little carried away.

I usually draw the line when something turns green, and when you try to trim it off, you find its green right through.

RED-DOG
10-22-2013, 15:17
As long as you don't open it, it will last for days, but when you open it you have to eat it, or it will go bad really fast.

Rasty
10-22-2013, 15:36
My redneck relatives made a believer of me a few years back at a family reunion. We had a cookout in mid-afternoon. The leftover burgers and hot dogs were taken back to the hotel. At 10pm I went to play poker in my relatives room and they were eating the leftovers, and they had been on the table all evening, unrefrigerated.

I still won't do that, but I do think it shows we get a little carried away.

Even the USDA rules for catering allows six hours. The way the rules works is you have six hours from the time a food leaves refrigeration to either be inside a stomach or garbage can. The food for a picnic type catering cannot be unrefridgerated then put back into inventory and used again once it has been declared under the six hour rule.

BillyGr
10-25-2013, 16:00
Another thing to think of (and particularly appropriate this time of year) - walk into any store that has a holiday food gifts section and see how many types of sausage, cheese etc. are stored on the shelves unrefridgerated and what kind of sell by dates they have on them.

MDSection12
10-25-2013, 16:21
We lost electricity recently for 5 days. the breakfast sausage I'd been eating was unrefrigerated and the house was still in the 50s and I ate it all 5 days without mishap. so I'm not afraid of summer sausage anymore. my grandma in south Georgia (it's hot down there) used to leave food out in before they had a refrigerator and it was ok. of course it got eaten pretty quickly because it was a large farm family. I think we worry a bit too much about leaving food out. someone sent a link to me from the Food Safety Admin telling which foods to throw away after an electrical outage. Two of the things on this list were eggs and tinned hams. give me a break. I mean decide for yourself what to do, but for me--summer sausage is going in my pack ! (and I love the dancing banana:banana:banana:banana so here it is
+1

I hate throwing away food so once in a while something gets neglected in my fridge and I end up taking the risk (within reason of course). My wife assures me I will get sick every time, and I never do. I think it's a totally overblown, wasteful mindset perpetuated in our culture.