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JAK
07-23-2010, 21:20
Tom Sawyer. Beauty eh.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7DFsBcVMDA

A modern day warrior
Mean mean stride,
Today's Tom Sawyer
Mean mean pride.

Though his mind is not for rent
Don't put him down as arrogant
His reserve, a quiet defense
Riding out the day's events
The river

What you say about his company
Is what you say about society
Catch the mist, catch the myth
Catch the mystery, catch the drift

The world is, the world is
Love and life are deep
Maybe as his skies are wide

Today's Tom Sawyer
He gets high on you
And the space he invades
He gets by on you

No his mind is not for rent
To any god or government
Always hopeful, yet discontent
He knows changes aren't permanent
But change is

And what you say about his company
Is what you say about society
Catch the witness, catch the wit
Catch the spirit, catch the spit

The world is, the world is
Love and life are deep
Maybe as his eyes are wide

Exit the warrior
Today's Tom Sawyer
He gets high on you
And the energy you trade
He gets right on to the friction of the day

Nean
07-23-2010, 23:22
Science will fly you to the moon, religion will fly you into a building.:-?

Blue Jay
07-24-2010, 08:39
Science will fly you to the moon, religion will fly you into a building.:-?

We have not been to the moon in decades and 12 Tribes is the last group to fly into buildings. Your post has no meaning.:-?

Nean
07-24-2010, 14:28
We have not been to the moon in decades and 12 Tribes is the last group to fly into buildings. Your post has no meaning.:-?

Was it suppose to??? :-?

:eek:

:banana

:p


:D


;)

JAK
07-25-2010, 19:32
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kkYhCX1uqQ

Happy belated two four, ya hosers. We should all start a new cult, the two four tribes cult. That's like way better than twelve tribes eh, like roughly twice as better, give or take a few beers maybe. I'll take them. Take off.

JAK
07-25-2010, 19:34
Oops. Forgot the accompanying music. OK. So take off eh.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ot70G4wSQi0&feature=related

Tinker
07-25-2010, 22:11
We have not been to the moon in decades and 12 Tribes is the last group to fly into buildings. Your post has no meaning.:-?

I'll go out on a limb and speculate that he has something against religion :rolleyes:.
"They" also say that "More wars have been started in the name of religion than.....".
I don't think that the last two WORLD wars had much to do about religion - more to do with selfish megalomaniacal power seekers.
But anyway, I hear that a lot from folks who have never been religious.
I could say what it is like to be an agnostic. I used to be one. It's a lonely, scary place.

Panzer1
07-25-2010, 23:16
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve_Tribes_communities

The Labor Department later fined the group two thousand dollars for a fifteen-year-old pushing a wheelbarrow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheelbarrow) and another fifteen-year-old changing a lightbulb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightbulb).

it seems like they were reaching with the light bulb thing...

Panzer

Nean
07-26-2010, 03:38
OM"G" Symolism is just so deep- please,---don't take me there.:rolleyes:

I want to hang w/ tha J.:eek:

Nean
07-26-2010, 03:39
OM"G" Symolism is just so deep- please,---don't take me there.:rolleyes:

I want to hang w/ tha J.:eek:


Sorry, symbolism. I'm confused.:o:o:o

bfitz
07-26-2010, 14:48
I know one black person who spent some time with them and found out they had some interesting ideas about race. I've observed them personally since the early nineties when I first encountered the "yashuas" recruiting in the parking lots of grateful dead shows. They are whacked. They don't want members to associate with their families or anyone from their previous life. They all wear a silly pony tail and make the women dress funny. If that doesn't say it all, then the child abuse allegations and other stuff ought to complete the picture. They are without a doubt the very definition of a mind-sucking cult. The yerba mate brownies are pretty good though. Caveat emptor.

Wolf - 23000
07-27-2010, 00:27
I know one black person who spent some time with them and found out they had some interesting ideas about race. I've observed them personally since the early nineties when I first encountered the "yashuas" recruiting in the parking lots of grateful dead shows. They are whacked. They don't want members to associate with their families or anyone from their previous life. They all wear a silly pony tail and make the women dress funny. If that doesn't say it all, then the child abuse allegations and other stuff ought to complete the picture. They are without a doubt the very definition of a mind-sucking cult. The yerba mate brownies are pretty good though. Caveat emptor.

bfitz,

WELL PUT! What many hikers who plan on staying there is if the cops do a raid on the 12-tribes home again, they arrest EVERYONE!!! It is not the police job to decided if they are part of the 12-tribe. That is someone the hiker's lawyer and the prosecutor has to sort out.
Wolf

Blue Jay
07-27-2010, 08:59
I know one black person who spent some time with them and found out they had some interesting ideas about race. I've observed them personally since the early nineties when I first encountered the "yashuas" recruiting in the parking lots of grateful dead shows. They are whacked. They don't want members to associate with their families or anyone from their previous life. They all wear a silly pony tail and make the women dress funny. If that doesn't say it all, then the child abuse allegations and other stuff ought to complete the picture. They are without a doubt the very definition of a mind-sucking cult. The yerba mate brownies are pretty good though. Caveat emptor.

Damn, as much as I like to argue with Bfitz, I can't find anything to disagree with here. This is a great thread a group that purposely spends weeks cold wet tired and hungry, in filthy clothing, eating dehydrated crap and sleeping on the ground calling another group a cult. I love it.

Nean
07-27-2010, 17:05
Damn, as much as I like to argue with Bfitz, I can't find anything to disagree with here. This is a great thread a group that purposely spends weeks cold wet tired and hungry, in filthy clothing, eating dehydrated crap and sleeping on the ground calling another group a cult. I love it.
*It takes a cult to know one?:confused:




*warning: this post contains the meaning of life for you deep thinkers.:eek:


:D

Luddite
07-29-2010, 11:41
I ran into these guys when I was on a hitchhiking trip with a friend. We met this dude wearing a Jesus robe and he asked if we were hungry and needed a place to stay for the night. They had this farm on the outside of town and after they gave us a tour and sang songs to us we realized they were a cult. But the dude ended up giving us a 2 hour ride to where we needed to go because we told him we would come back and stay with them. Of course we didn't. Stay away from those people. They only want your money.

bfitz
07-31-2010, 22:23
Damn, as much as I like to argue with Bfitz, I can't find anything to disagree with here. This is a great thread a group that purposely spends weeks cold wet tired and hungry, in filthy clothing, eating dehydrated crap and sleeping on the ground calling another group a cult. I love it.Hikers ain't a cult cuz there's no dear leader. We're more like UFO crazies or something. What some might call fringe. BTW...does anyone know of a thru-hiker who used the 12 T's hostel that has joined up?

RGB
07-31-2010, 23:52
... just visit the "Rick A. Ross Institute of New Jersey For The Study of Destructive Cults, Controversial Groups, and Movements" web site at

http://www.rickross.com

Seems ANYBODY not in the fundamentalist mainstream is "destructive" and "controversial" and generally a spawn of Satan, or at least gets painted with the same broad brush.

I'm already starting to LIKE the Twelve Tribes, if RARI is an enemy.

My daughter Grass stayed with them on her way through VT last year, and she liked them so much that she and I stopped off and visited with them on the drive back to Tennessee. Out of the mainstream of American consumerism, conspicuous consumption, faux religious orthodox fundamentalism, and the like? You betcha. Thank God for that.

I'd say their kids have as much chance of choosing a religion as small town Southern Baptist (or you fill in another fundamentalist denomination) kids do. Religious brain-washing is religious brain-washing. Being a 20-year-old cult or a 2,000-year-old cult (a thousand years with the Lord is as a day) if the same if it practices thought control. Many of the mainstream denominations are just as bad in my book.

Rain Man

.

I don't think "2,000 year old cult" would be the best way to refer to the "Christian Church." To compare any denomination of the Christian faith today to the church mentioned in Acts is almost laughable.

I do agree in that some mainstream denominations are just as bad. One of my best friends has told me some horror stories about his old Pentecostal church. I have met two others in college that have similar stories. Beatings, verbal abuse, the pastor has a lake house while the congregation is penniless, etc.

greenmtnboy
08-01-2010, 10:24
I had a gay teacher in high school, a famous atheist, who believes that all Christians are cultists: http://wasm.us/ He wrote a thick biography of non-theists, "Who's Who in Hell". Suffice it to say, his experiences in life drove him to such a tortured view of society.

Churches are where babies are christened, where couples are married, and where solemn or upbeat funerals are held. They are where people come together to share their lives according to ethical standards and firmly-held beliefs. Without church many people are lost.

Check out www.factnet.net for coverage of various cults.

My belief is that without the rule of law, anarchy takes over. Self-regulation of social groups is vital so that the government does not have to come in to do an investigation. No one wants another Jonestown, a "Heaven's Gate" calamity, a Waco situation, or another Baghwan cult: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osho_%28Bhagwan_Shree_Rajneesh%29

Our families and friendships are protections against cults.

rcli4
08-01-2010, 10:56
Hikers ain't a cult cuz there's no dear leader. ...

Baltimore Jack?

Skidsteer
08-01-2010, 16:49
Baltimore Jack?

Well...At least we'd have something better to drink than grape Kool-Aid for the grand finale.

TrailSquirrel
08-01-2010, 18:33
Well...At least we'd have something better to drink than grape Kool-Aid for the grand finale.


:sun :) :-? :eek: :mad:

bfitz
08-01-2010, 20:55
Baltimore Jack?Dear? Leader?

bfitz
08-01-2010, 21:00
Our families and friendships are protections against cults.Yep. That's why any organisation that encourages you to sever such ties is immediately suspect.

As far as christianity being a cult...well, some sects definitely fit the bill. My personal feeling is whatever gets you through your day. Whether it's glass of wine and a bit of meditation or being comforted by burying your head in some primitive mythology...if you do no harm to the world and people around you, you're ok with me.


And to Rainman...plenty of ways to avoid negative aspects of modern society without signing on for all the other crazy stuff.

Wolf - 23000
08-07-2010, 00:57
Our families and friendships are protections against cults.

greenmtnboy,

If only that was true. I lost a very close friend due to the twelve-tribe of 12 years. She was like a sister to me. Even as close friends as we were, having tribe-members that you live with, eat with, sleep with 24 hours 7 days a week telling you our friendships is wrong - after 5 years she gave in. That is what the twelve tribes stand for.

Wolf

greenmtnboy
08-07-2010, 11:11
Ultimately a friend or family member has to offer more to the member of a mind-controlling group than friendship. Work, living situation, caring relationships need to be there so the cult member has something as a reason to leave. A lot of people join cults because their living situation was intolerable, alcoholism, drug abuse, emotional abuse, meaninglessness in general living conditions--a cult group can offer unconditional acceptance and friendship when you have real unhappiness before. But joining a cult can be like going from the frying pan into the fire. If the cult member's parents go into panic mode and tell everyone their kid has gone crazy and even give an interview to the media to likewise vent their anger against their son/daughter who has gone off the deep-end--"why would he/she do this to us?" such a loving family, etc.. Most families only make things worse as they hire de-programmers, psychologists, talk to priests, gang-up against the "evil" cult while of course the alcoholic parents are spotless as the lamb...

If you check out some of the posts at FactNet and other relevant sites, you will come across productive ideas, and solutions for the cult/sect member who may be a bit confused about what he/she wants. The worst thing a family can do is try to twist the free will of the family member and distort and deny the reason why the son/daughter wanted to get away from a toxic family situation. My reason for looking for a conservative religous group had to do with my disgust with alcoholism, drug addiction in an older brother, the liberal, unfriendly, narcissistic society, the rock-drug-sex counter-culture, etc.. In truth, the problem is within me as I seek a solution outside of myself. I think we all know what the solutions are for ourselves, individually. But sometimes what we are going through at a given point is so painful that we look for desperate, or absolutist solutions.

Blue Jay
08-08-2010, 09:38
Hikers ain't a cult cuz there's no dear leader. We're more like UFO crazies or something. What some might call fringe. BTW...does anyone know of a thru-hiker who used the 12 T's hostel that has joined up?

Actually for the past 4 years, at the Long Trail Festival, I have asked hikers who have stayed there if anyone has even approached them to join. Not one time has has anyone been approached. Granted this is a small sample, ony a dozen, however the claim that they offer this service completely as a method of attracting members is clearly false. It just might be that they actually believe in following Christian beliefs. I know it is hard for cynics to understand this concept.

greenmtnboy
08-09-2010, 18:54
I doubt they set out to recruit or proselytize the hikers, aggressively. I spoke with a dedicated A/T hiker and trail angel at the Long Trail Festival. He said that many of the hiker hospitality offers in the South came with an evangelistic approach, and questioning whether he knew Jesus, and that he should do so that if he were struck by lightning, etc.. at least he would know he was going to heaven... I personally was never approached like this, but then again, I have still to hike from just north of Hot Springs to Waynesville, VA, so maybe I have yet to have someone ask me about my faith. I am all right with all sincere believers.

I think they could do a lot better if they connected with some local social workers, pastors, etc.. If you go to them with a problem--is their solution always going to be, "join us, believe in Yahshua, and be baptised into the body of Messiah"?

bfitz
08-09-2010, 19:44
Actually for the past 4 years, at the Long Trail Festival, I have asked hikers who have stayed there if anyone has even approached them to join. Not one time has has anyone been approached. Granted this is a small sample, ony a dozen, however the claim that they offer this service completely as a method of attracting members is clearly false. It just might be that they actually believe in following Christian beliefs. I know it is hard for cynics to understand this concept.Uh wrong. It's more likely that they will wait until approached rather than than pursue recruitment aggressively because the word would obviously get out. NO religion ever does ANYTHING without at least the idea of possible recruitment, or "saving souls" (as some like to call it) in mind...it's part and parcelt of what they are. The missionary goes to Africa to bring christ to the heathens. The food is brought along as an enticement, and many religious folks are obviously kind and sincere people, but that doesn't change the fact that they are spreading religion wherever they can. As far as thruhikers, I didn't figure many being easy to draw in given the thru-hikers individualistic attitude and need to be moving on, especially by Rutland when they have been hiking for 4-5 months and are nearing the completion of their grand endeavor. I highly doubt thru-hikers are very vulnerable to what they're pushing, but ya never know....

Blue Jay
08-10-2010, 15:33
NO religion ever does ANYTHING without at least the idea of possible recruitment, or "saving souls" (as some like to call it) in mind...it's part and parcelt of what they are.

Buddism has no concept of soul, let alone "saving" one. They also could care less if anyone joins or not. You are correct about a no religion doing anything because religion is a belief system which intrinsically itself cannot do anything.

bfitz
08-13-2010, 16:54
Buddism has no concept of soul, let alone "saving" one. They also could care less if anyone joins or not. You are correct about a no religion doing anything because religion is a belief system which intrinsically itself cannot do anything.Buddhism isn't technically a religion because it has no deity to worship or pie in the sky when you die if you've been good and submitted to whatever social norms your oppressors wish you to abide by (i.e. wear your burka and shut up).

berkshirebirder
08-13-2010, 17:13
I didn't figure many being easy to draw in given the thru-hikers individualistic attitude and need to be moving on, especially by Rutland when they have been hiking for 4-5 months and are nearing the completion of their grand endeavor. --bfitz

I would think this the case, too. But hearing how some thru-hikers obsess over hamburgers makes me think otherwise.

Luddite
08-13-2010, 17:13
They sound like decent people. Hippies. But decent people.

They actually hand out little pamphlets that say things like, "Why the Hippie movement failed", and "Hippiecrit". They look like cult members to me.

Blue Jay
08-14-2010, 20:38
Buddhism isn't technically a religion because it has no deity to worship or pie in the sky when you die if you've been good and submitted to whatever social norms your oppressors wish you to abide by (i.e. wear your burka and shut up).

Buddhists do not wear burkas. You really should avoid this topic.

Tilly
08-14-2010, 21:07
Buddhism isn't technically a religion because it has no deity to worship or pie in the sky when you die if you've been good and submitted to whatever social norms your oppressors wish you to abide by (i.e. wear your burka and shut up).

hmmm......

JAK
08-14-2010, 22:18
Actually that's a very fun game. You say "X isn't a religion because Yadda yadda yadda. Awesome game. It can be applied to any religion, and atheism also, of course. The because Yadda yadda yadda part is optional.

Jester2000
08-15-2010, 20:10
Buddhists do not wear burkas. You really should avoid this topic.

You need to reread his post. His point was that Buddhists do not have the sort of system that leads to things like the wearing of burkas.

In other words, he wasn't saying that Buddhists wear burkas. In fact, he was stating the opposite.

Blue Jay
08-17-2010, 21:02
You need to reread his post. His point was that Buddhists do not have the sort of system that leads to things like the wearing of burkas.

In other words, he wasn't saying that Buddhists wear burkas. In fact, he was stating the opposite.

OK, now explain how Buddhism is not a religion or how any variation of technical should be in a sentence with religion.

Skidsteer
08-17-2010, 21:10
OK, now explain how Buddhism is not a religion or how any variation of technical should be in a sentence with religion.

"Technical discussion of religion on an internet forum is crass."

That was easy. Got another one?

Blue Jay
08-17-2010, 21:23
"Technical discussion of religion on an internet forum is crass."

That was easy. Got another one?

Crass??????? Where did that come from?

Blue Jay
08-17-2010, 21:26
"Technical discussion of religion on an internet forum is crass."

That was easy. Got another one?

OK, I looked up your last few posts. Now I understand.:banana

Skidsteer
08-17-2010, 21:31
OK, I looked up your last few posts. Now I understand.:banana

:D


The message you have entered is too short. Please lengthen your message to at least 10 characters.
Goin' hikin' tomorrow. :banana

Jester2000
08-17-2010, 22:15
OK, now explain how Buddhism is not a religion or how any variation of technical should be in a sentence with religion.

I don't bother explaining other people's points of view. I explain the content of a post when someone misreads it and then makes snarky comments based on their misunderstanding.

bfitz
08-18-2010, 22:01
re·li·gion
   /rɪˈlɪdʒən/ Show Spelled[ri-lij-uhn] Show IPA
–noun
1.
a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, esp. when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency or agencies, usually involving devotional and ritual observances, and often containing a moral code governing the conduct of human affairs.

Admittedly, the second definition does refer to buddhism as a religion, but personally I tend toward defining religion as something requiring a god, and any set of beliefs that does not require worship of a "superhuman agency or agencies" as more of a philosophy, but it's true my definitions are anything but technical, except when intentionally using them as a basis for comparison, in which case the technicalities imposed by my definitions become necessarily valid. In any case, if you believe the gods' favor (or wrath) depend on a funny outfit or hairdo, or withdrawing from personal relationships with family members and/or loved ones, or assigning certain groups of people subservient status, you're probably in a cult. (Blue Jay et al: note use of the word "probably")

kayak karl
08-18-2010, 22:31
*warning: this post contains the meaning of life for you deep thinkers.:eek::D
Is the only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory

L.I.B Hal the Hiker finished the trail. tell Delta:) KK

chazaq
12-02-2010, 16:18
I was actually born in a Twelve Tribes community in West Minister Station, VT-- just south of Bellows Falls, VT. About an hour's drive from Rutland. I traveled on foot quite some time. I was born on the farm the Tribe still owns today. I only lived there for 3 months-- my parents had lived there 4 months prior to my birth. They also married in the community. Over the summer, I spent a week both at the farm in West Minister and the cafe/hostel in Rutland.

My take on the community is that they are a serious, over-worked, pious people. It is rare that you find folk who dedicate themselves fully to anything, and you can see in their faces a true devotion to matters holy-- both in the labor of thought and labor of the body. They don't really know how to relax. They are all workaholics, and this mentality is passed on to the children. The claims of child labor aren't completely unfounded. But let look at children today, in the larger American society. They live a life of excess, boredom, and amusement. I helped out an 12 year old boy who knew how to work a grain mill. Not only how to work it, but how to repair it as well. These are practical skills that most children don't have access to.

They are overworked, both by pressure of community leaders and also by their own guilt. They are God-fearing men. And one of the problems is that you don't really get to see the profits of your labor. All of the economics are hidden from sight.

They don't respect there women. The women in the community live under the ancient idea of the virtue of obedience. The women are even more worked than the men, even on the sabbath.

As with any serious devotion to faith or ideas, extreme consequences follow. The members of the faith hold humble, loving souls. They truly try everyday to love their fellow man and God as much as they can. They are very aware of their own short comings.

chazaq
12-02-2010, 16:19
Also, my name is Chazaq. My name comes from the community. They have the custom of naming their children ancient Hebrew. It is the only mark I have saved from my birth in the community!

mweinstone
12-02-2010, 17:57
tell it to the marines.


fake fake fake.
cult on rye with mayo on the side
i hope i never am a 12 tribes
hurt the kids
bannish the women
keep the cash
and pay no tax.

Luddite
12-02-2010, 18:45
But let look at children today, in the larger American society. They live a life of excess, boredom, and amusement.



Yeah, its called being a kid.

nabashalam
02-13-2011, 17:33
My name is David Pike and I am the adminstrator/moderator and news editor for http://www.factnet.org/ and have been approached by a film production company http://www.crazylegsproductions.com/ to help with a new pilot/series they are making on cults for MSNBC.

Here is what I was sent...
"We are producers partnered with a major news outlet, and are seeking families or individuals who were formerly involved in a demanding groups/organizations to share their stories. We are interested in both positive and negative experiences, and hope to hear from those who have separated from the group within the last 9 months. If you would like additional information, please email [email protected] and describe your current situation. Thank you."

I have been on the phone with them and the Twelve Tribes is on the "short list" to be the focus of the pilot. If not the pilot then for an episode for sure.

Chazaq, if you would care to be a part of this then please email the address above and they will be sure to contact you. You might get an auto response right away but they will email you personally within 48 hours.

If you have ex-member friends that might want to help please share this with them. And about the "9 month" thing... they are actually wanting to hear from all ex-members but are very interested in he newly exited and how they have re-adapted to functioning in the "world"

Also if you have any other questions you can email me at [email protected] And yes I am a ex-member who lived in community for 7 years and finally left in 2004.

Thanks! And thanks White Blaze for allowing me to post here. :)

BTW I actually lived in Ritland for 6 months in 2002 and worked at the "Back Homer Again Cafe" and also helped build the hostel upstairs and the shoe store next door.

Appalachian Tater
02-13-2011, 17:58
Nabashalam, how do we know you aren't trying to hunt down and recapture escaped cult members?

mweinstone
02-13-2011, 19:23
twelve tribes is just one of a million cults feeding the idiosyncracys of their founders odd personalitys and lifestyles while focusing on presenting a "clean upstanding just a little different image". it only works to ruin your otherwise free life if you allow it. dont buy into other peoples scams when you are hearing from so many they are what we say they are. please.

mweinstone
02-13-2011, 19:24
when tater told me about his 26 years in the cult, i felt for him. thank god hes out and free.lol.

Pony
02-14-2011, 12:49
Yeah, its called being a kid.

Which is a pretty recent invention. None of my grandparents made it past the 9th grade because they all had to drop out of school to help support their families. My grandfather was crawling around in coal mines at age fourteen. This was in the 1920's and 1930's.

Swaggmann
10-30-2011, 02:42
I stayed at theYellow Deli Hostel in Rutland over 4th of July 2011. Yea, it's some kind of areligious order. I won't go as far as to say a cult. My advice if you staythere, and you have some cash, tosses a few bucks into the offering plate. As forthe "Twelve Tribes" members in general, remember this. If you don't want to talk aboutreligion, don't open the door because they will surly walk through. Happytrails! Swagman

Grayhair
01-19-2012, 16:53
Concur with Swagman, I too stayed at the Yellow Deli Hostel in2011. Best advice is to not mentionreligion if you don’t want to talk about religion. They seem very cordial and I wanted to keepit that way. Have to plug the fact thatthe regional bus terminal is right behind the hostel so if you’re coming downfrom Killington or going back to Killington, it is very covenant. Also if you decide to use Rutland as a bailout point, Amtrak has daily service to New York City. Happy trails!

bamboo bob
01-19-2012, 17:09
I ate at the cafe. Really good food. Seemed a bit odd folks though but no weirder than that cult at the Friary in NY.

Sparkeh
09-26-2013, 19:07
haha I stayed here, no recruiting but it was extremely interesting to see a real commune cult

Starchild
09-26-2013, 19:17
The biggest downer, and a affront to a almighty being that gave the order be fruitful and multiply, is their seperation of sexes, in dorms and work for stay chores, but it was only one night.

marshbirder
09-26-2013, 21:14
I did not read this thread, but Twelve Tribes is always at Phish shows trying to get us on their bus. I stay far, far away from them.

Lone Wolf
09-26-2013, 21:18
i stay far, far away from phish folks

rock steady
12-28-2013, 14:52
Is Gene Spriggs still w/them? I knew them in Chattanooga where they started. A judge told them in court decree to get out of town. They refused until faced w/jail time. they headed to Vermont. Many many good people in the group but the truth holds no value whatsoever for them. Watch yourself!

ChinMusic
12-28-2013, 14:56
Glad I skipped it.

ChinMusic
12-28-2013, 15:59
Curious to see if that moderation rant will be allowed to stand.

I really don't see what the thread additions in 2013 were that out of line.

Again, I'm glad I skipped it.

max patch
12-28-2013, 16:40
Lot of difference between staying at a cult like 12 tribes and a church run hostel like The Place or The Church of the Mountain.

Dogwood
12-28-2013, 16:46
AGAIN, I ask with Chin Music's and Max Patch's comments, have either one of you personally stayed at the Twelve Tribes in Rutland? If you haven't, you might want to mention that in your opinions of staying at Twelve Tribes.

ams212001
12-28-2013, 17:00
haha I stayed here, no recruiting but it was extremely interesting to see a real commune cult


The biggest downer, and a affront to a almighty being that gave the order be fruitful and multiply, is their seperation of sexes, in dorms and work for stay chores, but it was only one night.

It is good to know that people who stay there are treated well and that you are really only required to follow the rules and structure they set before you. Also, it is good to know that you did not face any coercion or undo pressure to stay forever and ever.

Posts like this help to put into perspective that not every bad rumor is true and that even though this "cult" is a bit extreme they are not out to get hikers. I am sure people have had negative experiences as well but the good news is you can just walk away.

If I make it that far I wouldn't mind seeing how a commune works, but that is just speculation for way off in the future.

ChinMusic
12-28-2013, 17:21
AGAIN, I ask with Chin Music's and Max Patch's comments, have either one of you personally stayed at the Twelve Tribes in Rutland? If you haven't, you might want to mention that in your opinions of staying at Twelve Tribes.
Is there something about,"I'm glad I skipped it " that confuses you?

Jeff
12-28-2013, 18:14
I have visited with the folks who operate the "Yellow Deli" hostel in Rutland and have spoken to dozens of hikers who spent a night or two there. Most every comment I hear suggests it's a unique experience and that the hikers were treated well.

Misery
02-14-2014, 22:18
while on the trail the only people I ever heard say anything negative about the yelowdeli were people who did not go there. i stayed there 2 nights and although the 12 tribes people are not your typical people they are friendly and pleasant and the accommodations were spectacular compared to many of the other hostels along the trail. They understand hikers often don't have much in the way of money and are willing to allow people to do work-for-stay. when I do the LT I will definitely be staying there again. Oh and the food is great.

Wolf - 23000
02-15-2014, 00:04
while on the trail the only people I ever heard say anything negative about the yelowdeli were people who did not go there. i stayed there 2 nights and although the 12 tribes people are not your typical people they are friendly and pleasant and the accommodations were spectacular compared to many of the other hostels along the trail. They understand hikers often don't have much in the way of money and are willing to allow people to do work-for-stay. when I do the LT I will definitely be staying there again. Oh and the food is great.

The devil can be friendly too until he gets his way. They may be friendly up to a point until they stab you in the back. I lost a really good friend of 12 years because their belief did not believe a man and woman should be close friends unless they were married. They end up telling her to stay away from me. Do yourself a favor and stay away from the place.

Wolf

lonehiker
02-15-2014, 03:08
Stayed there in 2008. As far as hostels go it was more than adequate. Would stay again.

4eyedbuzzard
02-15-2014, 03:54
Well, if you like the notions of the subservience of women, racial separatism, running right up against the edge of the law on child labor and education laws, members breaking ties with existing families, etc - then I guess they are okay. :rolleyes: Some in this very old thread have mentioned that they are Christians. Not that it really matters to me, but they are definitely not in the sense that the word is used today. They are more akin to Messianics than anything else. And while they aren't Jim Jones and the Peoples Temple, or David Koresh and the Branch Davidians - YET - because of their "devotion", aka indoctrination, mind control, and obedience, they are closer to that ilk than I am comfortable with. Cults have a habit of eventually going off the deep end.

wornoutboots
02-15-2014, 09:50
I've seen them at Trails Days, they had a booth there selling "Mate", it's a tea & they were working the crowd very hard giving out information on their cult. It was interesting to watch people being drawn to the warm subtle ways.

wornoutboots
02-15-2014, 10:16
Interesting & sad thought? It just occurred to me after sifting through some of this thread. There's a shift in America these days, some folks who will never attempt to read or watch the news seem very laid back, tolerant & non judgmental & those who can't get enough of "their" choice of right or left "news" & are seemingly uptight, quickly intolerant, judgmental & even hateful. Kinda like a "right" or "left" cult?? Just a thought.

Hill Ape
02-15-2014, 12:07
so what i've heard so far. the food is good. they don't push their belief, you are simply within their fold and see how they do. and they house males/females seperately. that doesn't bother me much, many european hostels do the same.

they may be a little odd, but it doesn't sound like they are recruiting hikers to join, which would bother me

i see no problem, they want to live different by choice, that part of what makes america great. long as there is no abuse of any kind, i wish them well. and i look forward to the food