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squeezebox
10-26-2013, 13:14
how do you do baking on the trail? brownies , pancakes, etc.

max patch
10-26-2013, 13:19
http://www.bakepacker.com/

But for pancakes you just need a frypan.

illabelle
10-26-2013, 13:46
Haven't tried the bakepacker, but I've done more than just regular pancakes in a frying pan. A packet of cornbread muffin mix cooked like pancakes are pretty tasty. Packet recipe calls for an egg and some milk, but I just use water. Don't use too much water. On our last trip I tried the same thing with blueberry muffin mix. Turned out pretty good. Of course regular pancakes are good too!

Feral Bill
10-26-2013, 13:53
http://www.bakepacker.com/

But for pancakes you just need a frypan.

Doesn't brown, but really does work. Great for small trout, too.

squeezebox
10-26-2013, 13:54
those were called hoe cakes ,you mixed a thick batch of corn bread, put it on top of a garden hoe, held it over the fire till done.

aficion
10-26-2013, 15:29
those were called hoe cakes ,you mixed a thick batch of corn bread, put it on top of a garden hoe, held it over the fire till done.

LW calls them "lady" cakes.

illabelle
10-26-2013, 15:32
those were called hoe cakes ,you mixed a thick batch of corn bread, put it on top of a garden hoe, held it over the fire till done.

I like learning new/old things. Thank you, Bryce.

yaduck9
10-26-2013, 17:00
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hm4xG_SUd0

Hikes in Rain
10-26-2013, 18:55
Baking bread on a stick. It works! http://www.paddlinglight.com/articles/tutorial/how-to-cook-bannock-on-a-stick-campfire-bread/

If it falls off, it's still good, but then it's called ashcake.

QiWiz
10-27-2013, 11:01
My favorite way to bake is over a wood stove. Here's my favorite cornbread method.
BTW, for eggs use Ova Easy crystals and for milk use Nido whole powdered milk for great results.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AmlkelDlGU

peakbagger
10-27-2013, 14:34
These work real well http://www.backpackerspantry.com/products/outback-oven/outback-oven-sets/outback-oven-ultralight.html. Definitely not great for a UL hiker but nice for camping trips. I have done pizza on the Pacific Crest trail and had a few berry corn muffin contests over the years. The larger version comes with a teflon pan that works well for group gear. If I am not in the mood to carry the entire rig, the aluminized cloth hood make a great heat shield to cut down on the amount of fuel you use while cooking, I used mine with my pocket rocket for a couple of years before I built my hanging shield.

Dromedary gingerbread mix is a great easy to use and delicious desert to bake for a group. The Jiffy mixes work well but you need eggs, I have used powdered eggs in the past and they work but no where near as well as real eggs. Bisquick also works well.

In general the outback oven is heavier than a bakepacker but the resulting product is superior (although both taste great). Hard to justify solo but if you are with two or three folks its worth it.

I took mine on a couple of AT sections and did gingerbread. It was off season but the thruhikers who were camping nearby sure appreciated it.

Slo-go'en
10-27-2013, 15:01
The problem with pancakes is you need some kind of frypan to make them. And a gas stove. I found an alky stove just doesn't get hot enough, quick enough. And of course, if your going to make pancakes, you need pure New Hampshire Maple Syrup, not that stuff from Vermont! Okay for a short weekend trip, but way too much stuff and work during a thru-hike.

Same goes with baking. While it can be done, it is time consuming and takes extra equipment to do right. It might be fun to do the first few days on the trail and then send the stuff home at Neels. However, you would run the risk of getting the trail name "half baked".

Another Kevin
10-27-2013, 17:36
I'm just a clueless weekender, so maybe I'm willing to carry a few comforts that Real Hikers don't.

I find that I can make a nice batch of three muffins in either my GSI Dualist pot or my K-Mart grease pot. I use a Fauxbaker (http://www.trailcooking.com/fauxbaker/). I changed the design slightly. Instead of having little nail holes all through the disc, I used an office paper punch to put a triple row of holes around the edge. When I'm not baking, it goes under my Penny Stove as an additional heat reflector.

The batch of muffins I did on the trail yesterday was from a Dr Oetker's mug cake with some dry milk added to the mix. One mug cake makes three muffins perfectly. But just-add-water muffin mixes work well, or any cake mix (Per muffin: 3 Tbsp cake mix, 1 Tbsp dry milk, and just enough water to moisten the ingredients), or any prepared biscuit mix. (If it calls for any sort of shortening, squirt in some olive oil.) I brought the water to a boil over a Penny Stove, dropped on the simmer ring, and let it simmer 15 minutes and stand another 5. An ounce of fuel did it.

If you're just cooking for yourself, steaming the muffin in a freezer bag works. It's prettier if you use foil muffin cups, and since they're so light, I tuck them in for weekend trips.

I started, by the way, with more boiling water so that I could have hot coffee standing by. I bring an old-fashioned pour-over Melitta filter, and brew into a Nalgene bottle inside a Reflectix jacket. I was able to greet a hiking partner with a fresh hot muffin and a cup of fresh-brewed coffee, on an ounce-and-a-half of fuel.

I've also done chicken and biscuits by the same method (steam the biscuits while the chicken and vegetables are steeping in a freezer bag cozy). Or fake pizza - biscuit dough, topped with reconstituted dehydrated tomato sauce, shredded string cheese, abruzzese sausage.

For the pizza, I put the biscuit dough into an individual foil pie plate that was just small enough to fit in my cookpot, that I brought along for the purpose. (I'm sure that this would work for doing one large muffin, too!) That might actually work for a thru-hiker: find a brand of individual pie that has a plate that fits your cookpot, and eat one at a resupply stop, while picking up a pack of Dromedary or Betty Crocker muffins or a little box of Bisquick, and use it for baking, throwing it out when it is too worn or crudded to use. Steam-sterilize it every so often.

Of course, baking is time-consuming, so mileage slaves may decide they'd rather forgo the baked goods and hike a mile or two longer. Being clueless about long-distance hiking, I can offer only a weekender's perspective. In my case, I stuffed my sleeping bag and pad, and loaded up everything but the cookset and the clothing that goes at the very top of the pack, while I was waiting for stuff to steam.

Your mileage may vary. Hike your own hike. Void where prohibited, but only if you absolutely can't find a toilet.

Wise Old Owl
10-27-2013, 18:16
My favorite way to bake is over a wood stove. Here's my favorite cornbread method.
BTW, for eggs use Ova Easy crystals and for milk use Nido whole powdered milk for great results.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AmlkelDlGU


cant wait to see the video on mini pepperoni pizzaaaaa!