PDA

View Full Version : I have $170 to spend on clothes & rain gear



Shroomism
08-21-2005, 03:18
So I need to buy synthetic clothes and rain gear
I want to go as minimal as possible, but have enough warm layers for winter
Here's what I was thinking

1 pair sock liners, 2 pair wool socks ~$20
duofold t-shirt - $5
long sleeve - $10
lightweight fleece - $20
zip off pants - $30
silkweight long underwear pants - $15
wool liner gloves - $15

ultralight poncho - $40

Think this will be enough to keep me warm? Any other suggestions?

capoken
08-21-2005, 03:48
I's day go with driducks if you don't plan on bushwacking. They weigh about 8 0z for the set (top and bottom). They will keep you drier than a ponch because they are extremely breathable. If you need something more durable go with Froggtoggs. they are about $70 for a set - but if you go to their web site and call them they always have some odd ball stuff (usually collge sports teams that didn't need the whole order) and you'll get a set for $40. A set of froggtoggs will last you your whole thru hike. And they are a great wind layer. Ponchos are cumbersome to use as a wind layer. And they don't breath at all.

The General
08-21-2005, 06:31
Having spent 20+ years in the military and soldier'd in some pretty miserable weather conditions from the Artic to the Jungle areas of South America I have never found a good use for rain pants, apart from stopping you standing buck naked in the laundromat in town whislt everything else is washed, I carried a pair for a while on the AT on my Thru Hike in 04 but then shipped them home. My advice is go with the froggtoggs I saw plenty of guys using these on the AT never realy heard a bad word about them. Just use a jacket if you must your legs will soon dry and you will have some cash spare for a couple of beers whilst they do. Last thought skin is waterproof just keep the core tempreture up and you will be fine.

kyhipo
08-21-2005, 08:50
need another pair of socks ,might consider goodwill for wool sweaters ,jackets some kind of hard shell for heavey sweater besides poncho :dance ky

Just Jeff
08-21-2005, 11:36
What winter conditions will you be depending solely on a lightweight fleece for upper body warmth?

It may be possible to get by with that if you're experienced. One thing...keep moving until bedtime when you crawl into your bag and you can do it, but any puttering around camp (like going to get water after you've already cooled down) and you'll get chilled.

Unless you have a lot of experience hiking that way, I'd start with a heavier insulation layer. Maybe heavier fleece to layer over the lightweight one, and you can send one home later (or bounce it).

Like kyhipo said, Goodwill, Salvation Army and other thrift stores often have polyester shirts, fleece, and even hard shells for $1-2. Just look in one or two every weekend...soon you'll get lucky and pick things up here and there. I saw a Patagonia jacket once for about $8. Kinda like looking for silnylon at Walmart.

Shroomism
08-21-2005, 14:47
Yeah I was seriously considering the frogg toggs but I couldn't justify spending $70 on rain gear to myself. However if they are as good as everyone says.. I might just have to take the plunge and get em.. better to have some decent rain gear than something I would suffer in.

I didn't mention a shell because I already have an insulated/wind breaker/water resistant snowboarding jacket. Figured that would work just fine over the fleece and long sleeve in cold weather. Any colder and I would add a wool sweater or something. And another pair of socks..covered...are acrylic/poly socks ok?

I am definitely going to check out goodwill. If I can save some money on the other stuff than I will definitely go for the frogg toggs.

capoken
08-21-2005, 22:13
Yeah I was seriously considering the frogg toggs but I couldn't justify spending $70 on rain gear to myself. However if they are as good as everyone says.. I might just have to take the plunge and get em.. better to have some decent rain gear than something I would suffer in.
If you are worried about the frogg togg $ then deffinately give them a call and ask about their "over stock" ect. My partnet got his suite for much less than $70 because it was from some college sports team that didn't take their whole order. You will certainly save a lot of money if you do this. Call them and they will send you a spreadsheet listing their current overflow. It's a sure thing!

DLFrost
08-22-2005, 03:15
Like kyhipo said, Goodwill, Salvation Army and other thrift stores often have polyester shirts, fleece, and even hard shells for $1-2. Just look in one or two every weekend...soon you'll get lucky and pick things up here and there. I saw a Patagonia jacket once for about $8. Kinda like looking for silnylon at Walmart.
Yep... Picked up a lightweight pair of fleece pants (sold as PJ bottoms) for $8 over at Burlington Coat Factory a couple of months ago.

About the Frog Toggs: Get the Pro Action suit. It replaces the usual elastic hems with (a) a drawcord in the jacket and (b) velcro ankle closures in the pants. These make the things a lot more breathable. The hood is also better, with a brim.

Socks: Watch the thickness. Too thick and they're hard to dry out. Wear two pair if you need em.

Doug Frost

Jaybird
08-22-2005, 08:21
So I need to buy synthetic clothes and rain gear
I want to go as minimal as possible, but have enough warm layers for winter
Here's what I was thinking:
1 pair sock liners, 2 pair wool socks ~$20
duofold t-shirt - $5
long sleeve - $10
lightweight fleece - $20
zip off pants - $30
silkweight long underwear pants - $15
wool liner gloves - $15
ultralight poncho - $40
Think this will be enough to keep me warm? Any other suggestions?


First...if you are "WARM-NATURED" this list is probably good enuff...
i'd make sure to keep the "FLEECE" items well protected from the elements.

the hiker slogan: "COTTON IS EVIL!" is so true.

I guess it all comes down to what works for YOU is the right items to carry on your "adventure."

good luck with your hike. :D

generoll
08-22-2005, 14:10
take a look at the Sears workpants. They are a poly blend and dry reasonably fast, are durable, and cost about $20.

soulrebel
08-22-2005, 16:57
I prefer a trash bag and a bottle of whiskey, the rest goes to the strippers!!!

j/k

The Solemates
08-22-2005, 17:04
So I need to buy synthetic clothes and rain gear
I want to go as minimal as possible, but have enough warm layers for winter
Here's what I was thinking

1 pair sock liners, 2 pair wool socks ~$20
duofold t-shirt - $5
long sleeve - $10
lightweight fleece - $20
zip off pants - $30
silkweight long underwear pants - $15
wool liner gloves - $15

ultralight poncho - $40

Think this will be enough to keep me warm? Any other suggestions?

i would spend less on the clothes and more on the raingear. clothes are easy to find for inexpensive, but raingear i wouldnt scrimp on.

fiddlehead
08-22-2005, 22:47
I'd forget the poncho idea. Frogg Toggs all the way! (if you just get the jacket, you can save money, if you get the pants, you don't need the zip fleece pants, just wear poly bottoms underneath the froggtogg pants (mid-weight or hvyweight in spring and fall, light in summer) also, fleece socks are lighter and dry quicker than wool. (and keep you at least as warm) my 2 cents

verber
08-23-2005, 01:19
You list looks reasonable. I would do a second liner. Rather than silk-weight I would go with mid-weight tights. I have found long pants gives me a pretty comfort range, and that by the time I want tights, I would rather have something warmer than silk-weight. I might drop the wool liner gloves and just use my extra socks. Rather than a poncho I would suggest DriDucks at Gossamer Gear for $25. They are a bit like FroggToggs: 1/2 price, bit less durable, more breathable, a bit lighter. With these changes we are at $125. Rather than a fleece, I would would get a high loft synthetic vest or jacket.. and leave the snowboarding jacket behind. If you hit a patagonia outlet during the memorial day sale you could get a micro puff jacket for around $60 which would put you over budget by around $10.

--mark

Shroomism
08-23-2005, 02:53
Yeah so I'm getting the Frogg Toggs Pro Action Suit.. I called yesterday but they dont have any overstock right now (Thanks for the tip)

I was given some nice thick wool/nylon/polyester gloves today.. should keep my hands nice and toasty. They are convertible.. mittens, and then you can pull back the mitten part and it's fingerless gloves. Pretty cool. Then I guess I need some rain covers for the gloves.

Going to go to the goodwill tomorrow and see what I can come up with. Thanks everyone for the suggestions!

Shroomism
09-06-2005, 16:51
Ok guys i have come a little further and I'm looking for some more advice. Basically I'm wondering if what I have will give me enough layers/flexibility for winter camping throughout the midatlantic and northeast.

- polypro t-shirt
- nylon pants
- merino wool thin sweater
- lightweight base layer top & bottom
- wool/acrylic socks
- Frogg Toggs pro action suit
- wool gloves and fleece beenie

That's my basic setup. I'm thinking I'll need another top layer when it's all said and done. So right now my cold weather top option would be base layer > t shirt > wool sweater > frogg toggs. I'll probably need something warmer over the sweater for super cold right? My legs don't get very cold and long underwear > nylon pants and frogg toggs should be all I need.. right?

hikerdude
09-23-2005, 08:52
What I been doing, is I get the poncho and the frogg toggs. and carry both, oh my 8 oz poncho, my poor body. Then I find out the pants get all sticky and won't come off and i'm about 200 degrees inside the suit and pants that won't come off to the point of just ripping them, and the rest just want you to go thru all this, and they all end up hiking with no raingear, the ones I see. So I try the poncho, its don't look cool, like the in fashion on the trail. But Earl shaffer used a poncho for his tent and raingear. The Army don't issue frogg toggs. they issure Ponchos. And I got 3. first one was blue the second one is forest green and the 3rd one is blue but silny and a very large 5x8 tarp size that I got 4 stings in the corners to tie to tree sapling to take a break in the rain. So I don't really care for shelters cause I can rest anywhere with a rock to sit on. With my poncho in the rain and I don't need a pack cover either. Sometimes I use my poncho for a ground sheet and just lay out anywhere in the sun. What really sux is, if you get to some really cold spot like the White mountains and your above treeline in the wind and rain, then the poncho is a sailcloth.
Some of these things are nothing more than a American Fashion Statement. The poncho been around since the caveman, right? And the European Fashion Statement is really ahead of ours, they carry a ultralite coated raingear and a poncho. Can. you cover your sleeping bag and pack and yourself with a frogg togg? When Its cold enough to snow you don't need any rain gear. Just a wind suit is best, or the sweat will freeze up on the back of your jacket in a few hours. Still cheaper, use a cheap sweat suit. They cheap ones are all poly anyway. I also tired the sears pants. They chaff my legs. Sweat suit and a wind suit is what you want to try for winter. They you need to spend the rest on a good down sweater jacket to sit around in the dark at 500pm.

frieden
09-23-2005, 09:45
The Frogg Toggs is a great idea, thanks. Other than rain gear, I don't have a clothing budget. Thanks to my crochet group, my gear is going to look like a crochet magazine. You wouldn't believe what these women can do with a crochet hook (I'm just learning), and they don't just crochet with yarn. One lady is doing a project with plastic bags. I'm working with a basket pattern in twine. I just found out about a mesh bag pattern last night. People are using them as grocery bags. They scrunch up in a tiny ball, weigh nothing, but expand into this huge bag to carry all kinds of stuff. I'm also going to make a smaller one to hang dry my cookware. Ever think of learning how to crochet? ;)

Lanthar Mandragoran
09-23-2005, 10:06
The Frogg Toggs is a great idea, thanks. Other than rain gear, I don't have a clothing budget. Thanks to my crochet group, my gear is going to look like a crochet magazine. You wouldn't believe what these women can do with a crochet hook (I'm just learning), and they don't just crochet with yarn. One lady is doing a project with plastic bags. I'm working with a basket pattern in twine. I just found out about a mesh bag pattern last night. People are using them as grocery bags. They scrunch up in a tiny ball, weigh nothing, but expand into this huge bag to carry all kinds of stuff. I'm also going to make a smaller one to hang dry my cookware. Ever think of learning how to crochet? ;)
Now, there's an idea for the DIY folks...