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pawlinghiker
11-21-2013, 20:33
I am planning a few winter camping trips this year and started putting my pack together for the trip.

I plan on hiking out sleeping over spending the next day hiking , sleeping over again and then packing out in the morning.

I have complied a preliminary list for you experts to look over and let me know what you think and what I should change. Its not 100% complete but I figured I would start...

Gear :

Backpack
N.F. ultralight 0 degree down bag
Tent BA Creek UL
BA ground cover
Sleeping pad
Jet boil & extra fuel
Water purifier ( UV )
2 32 oz water bottle
Knife, spoon & fork
Bowl and mug
Bandana
Rope
Battery charger
Phone in life case
2 head lamps
6 aaa batteries
4 hand warmers
Toilet paper
Empty poland spring bottle ( pee bottle )
Small cotton rag for pots and bowls

Clothing :

wearing:

Socks ( merlino hiker )
Capiline 2 top and bottoms
Patagonia backcountry pants
N.F. TKA 100 top
Patagoina R4 fleece top
Hat & gloves
Polarized sunglasses
Gore Tex Hiking boots

Packing:

2 pairs of merlino hiking socks
N.F. HyVent jacket
N.F. TKA fleece pants
Patagonia down jacket
Capiline 3 top & bottom
Face gator & over gloves

Food :

Bear can
4 backpacker meals ( 2 lunch 2 dinner )
6 pack oat meal and dried fruits ( 2 breakfast )
Coffee and nido
Hot drink mix
Dried meat
Peanut butter treats
Cheese blocks


Any input would great !!

1azarus
11-21-2013, 20:42
curious about the bear cannister...where will you be hiking? ...they'll likely be sleeping.

pawlinghiker
11-21-2013, 20:49
reading to much I guess.

Im camping around the CT / NY border on the AT.

I figured you never know and it beats hanging your food from a tree. theres also other critters besides bears, but you have point, they will be sleeping.. I hope

jimmyjam
11-21-2013, 20:53
Don't forget the first aid kit, lighter and matches.

hikerboy57
11-21-2013, 20:53
Bring a lighter.
And cheesecake

Sarcasm the elf
11-21-2013, 20:55
Well the list is definitely workable. Though I'm sure you will get plenty of suggestions on things to consider.

Where do you plan on hiking?

Do you own all of this gear, or are you looking for advice in what to buy?

If you already have everything and want to find out what works, you can always take a quick drive over to Wiley shelter and do an overnight. It's a great location to test out your winter gear since you can park a quarter mile away and have the option of bailing out if something goes wrong.

winger
11-21-2013, 20:55
Seems like way too much gear for 2-3 days. I'd leave behind the extra headlamp and batteries the bowl, the hand warmers, the charger, the extra water bottle, and the extra fuel.

hikerboy57
11-21-2013, 20:55
Why two head lamps?

Wise Old Owl
11-21-2013, 21:01
caus he doesn't have owl night vision.

pawlinghiker
11-21-2013, 21:18
just seems like having a second head lamp would be a good thing to carry, one breaks.. or lost and your in the dark.

Yes first aid kit is already packed and lighters are included.

I dont really like Wiley shelter, to close to the road, dont like hearing cars or other people.

I do already own most of my list. still waiting for sales on a few items, but for the most part Im set.

I know I can scale down the weight a little I figured better to have it and it helps with conditioning for a longer hike down the line.

Does anyone just use a UV or do you bring a back up method for water purification ?

Tri-Pod Bob
11-21-2013, 21:30
The bears are still out & about right now, but a canister isn't needed for your winter trips. I'd just keep it in the tent or hang it from a low limb so it's too high for raccoons. 4-5 feet would be more than enough to work. Also wondering why 2 headlamps/6 batteries for a 2 night outing. My last trip was 8 nights. I had 1 headlamp w/the same batteries I'd been using since late July. I don't see crampons listed. You may want to think about bringing a set for yourself......you will encounter icy areas in that neck of the woods. It's pretty much the same as my neck of the woods. As always.....HYOK & enjoy the trips outdoors!

Feral Bill
11-21-2013, 21:46
You might want to add an additional pad, depending on how warm yours is. I predict you will have a great trip.

pawlinghiker
11-21-2013, 21:47
I have a therma rest pad.

no inflatables.

i figure with a good bag and layers I wont need the second pad

Tri-Pod Bob
11-21-2013, 21:50
You may want to consider liner type gloves for hiking & a pair of mitts to wear over them in camp or just a pair of the mittens that fold back at the knuckles to allow exposed finger dexterity. Mitts are warmer than gloves, IMHO.

pawlinghiker
11-21-2013, 22:25
i have a pair of mountain hardware wind proof fleece type gloves and a old school pair of Swany snowboarding over gloves, there kevlar and never wore out, had them about 20 years...

Tri-Pod Bob
11-21-2013, 22:41
i have a pair of mountain hardware wind proof fleece type gloves and a old school pair of Swany snowboarding over gloves, there kevlar and never wore out, had them about 20 years...

Should do! You may still want to consider a CCF to supplement your pad. Even with the bag & layers, you will compress that insulation & make it much less effective. Then the warmth robbing ground will go to work on you.

pawlinghiker
11-21-2013, 22:49
CCF ? sorry ... not sure.

Another Kevin
11-21-2013, 23:11
Closed Cell Foam. The blue foam pad from XYZ-Mart.

Slo-go'en
11-21-2013, 23:15
Closed Cell Foam - sort of old school. The blue walmart mat is CCF as are the Z-rests.

It really all depends on how cold it gets. 1" of CCF matts are typical for the winter. The ground will suck a lot of heat out of you.

You don't have to gear up for full on artic conditions near the CT/NY line, but it can still get nasty. The trick is of course not to go when it's nasty...

Since you will be camping in the same spot for 2 nights, be sure to stuff your bag, roll up the matts and pick up the tent and move it a little before you leave for the day. Otherwise you could find these frozen to the ground when you come back. Heavy as they are, Nalgine bottles and thier insulating sleeves are worth it.

No matter what, don't start out the next day still wearing the clothes you slept in. It's very tempting, but you'll regret it later.

perrito
11-21-2013, 23:22
Bring some chocolate goodness for dessert. It'll give your body fuel to generate some warmth overnight.

CCF = closed cell foam. Think Wallyworld stiff blue pad.

Also, boil water and fill up a Nalgene bottle with your extra socks insulating or a reflectix cozy and sleep with it. Very warm!

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pawlinghiker
11-21-2013, 23:25
why are nalgene bottles so much better ?

why will I regret wearing the same clothes ?

long johns ? diddnt plan on taking those off for any reason ??

T.S.Kobzol
11-21-2013, 23:37
Nalgene bottle does not split open if the liquid freezes inside.

freeholden
11-21-2013, 23:40
Take your whole gear list. You'll know by/ at the end of your trip what worked, what failed and what was dead weight. You'll get a million different responses here but NONE is more important than you just going on the trail and figuring it out. You'll be a stronger hiker in the end. Embrace mistakes and learn from them. Good luck on the trail!!!

Wise Old Owl
11-21-2013, 23:40
Possibly the best way to answer the tread is to agree on a winter list that we agreed on before.. rather than fixing his list. Can anyone take a moment and dig that up?

pawlinghiker
11-22-2013, 00:01
thanks for all the responses, you guys are really helpful.

I have not finished the list . I was thinking of packing a hand warmer type back pad. it gives off heat for 8 hours, might be nice in the tent. Ive slept with one at home... roasty toasty !!

Just Bill
11-22-2013, 00:25
put lithium batteries in your headlamps- assuming you can. They will do better in the cold and you won't need spares. Winter makes sense to carry two headlamps, if you need to night hike or just need the extra light.
UV treatment will probably need to be kept in a pocket- they don't do that well in the cold- but should be fine if you keep it warm.
Same goes for your active Jetboil canister- jacket pocket and in your sleeping bag at night. Bring a square of cardboard or CFF to keep the canister out of direct contact with the ground when you cook.
You may want a scrap of CFF (8x16) to sit on during breaks or at camp.
Pee bottle- unless your little guy is really little- you're going to want a widemouth bottle- you don't want to miss. You'll also want at least 20 oz size, preferably 32 oz.
Nalgene (or other brand) capabable of taking hot liquids is a wintertime must. Platypus bags can accept hot water too- an excellent way to warm your bag and keep your water from freezing at night. I typically use one Nalgene and my 3L bladder.
Unless you are very comfortable with your firebuilding skills- add some extra firestarters. Also consider a heavier knife suitable for batoning wood if you plan to build a fire.

Clothes look fine- nice to have separate sleeping base layer- but not the end of the world for a short trip. Dedicated sleep socks are a good idea though. Use your Platypus bladder for a pillow- you probably won't have spare clothes at night.

Food-
Swap out a few lunches for several soups, ramen, etc. Two quick hot (mainly liquid) meals are better in the winter than sitting down for a long lunch that is likely to get cold before you finish it anyway. Your jetboil will have you fed quick and you will likely enjoy several short hot food breaks more than one long cold one.
Add some pepperoni, salami or other high fat meats for snacks too.
Hot drink mix- what you like but I would suggest some tea for before bed. Bring some butter- put a heavy tablespoon into a cup or two of tea before bed- the fat will help you sleep warmer.
Put your backpacker meals at dinner into your sleeping bag to substitute for a cozy and warm your bag a bit to boot.

Looks like you're nearly there- as others said- take too much and pare it down after a few trips. Hit the backyard too!

Studlintsean
11-22-2013, 00:25
I was actually thinking about posting mine with a new thread for feedback in the Damascus area the week of Christmas for 2 nights (assuming no major storms passing by) so ill do it here. Hope you dont mind. I think it's pretty dialed in and could help (or I could use the feedback):

ULA Circuit
TT Contrail
Thermarest All Season- Reg length
WM Alpinelite - 20 deg

MSR Pocket Rocket
Fuel Cannister
GSI Pot
Aqua Mira
2 1 Ltr Platypus and 1 2 Ltr Platypus for Camp
Lighter
ZPaks Food Bag

Clothes Worn:
Light Weight Base Pants
Shorts( ill hike in these down to at least 30 with no precipitation)
Rei wicking T-Shirt
Cap 3 1/4 Zip
Rain Jacket
Darn tough socks
Brook Cascadia trail runners

Clothes Camp:
REI Mid Layer top and bottom
Montbell Alpine Light Down Parka
Rain Pants
Fleece Gloves and WP mittens
Beannie
Darn tough socks
Crocs

Miscellaneous
Phone
Cards (ID, Insurance , Debit)
sparelighter
Head Lamp (w/ 1 spare battery)
50 ft para cord with mini caribeaner
FAK
Small Knife.

I think total I should be right at or below 20 lbs.

any feedback is welcome and Palinghiker I think this is pretty dialed in. Hope this helps and enjoy the trip.

LIhikers
11-22-2013, 00:37
why are nalgene bottles so much better ?...........

Because you can put boiling water into a Nalgene bottle without worrying about it melting.
Make sure the cover is on good and tight and then put the bottle of hot water inside your sleeping bag to preheat it.
Makes climbing into the bag so much more enjoyable!

George P Burdell
11-22-2013, 00:46
Have you hiked in the Patagonia R4 jacket before? Unless you have the LW version, the regular R4 is totally wind proof (gore windbloc I think) and it doesn't breathe at all. I wore it on the trail in mid 20 degree weather and I was sweating in no time. Because of that and the fact that it doesn't pack down small, I don't take the R4 on winter hikes or any active pursuits. Of course your mileage may vary...

Feral Bill
11-22-2013, 01:31
I have a therma rest pad.

no inflatables.

i figure with a good bag and layers I wont need the second pad If it is two inches or more thick you should be fine. If not, a closed cell pad underneath is a very good idea.

Slo-go'en
11-22-2013, 02:58
why are nalgene bottles so much better ?

why will I regret wearing the same clothes ?

long johns ? diddnt plan on taking those off for any reason ??

Besides holding hot water, nalgene's have a wide mouth which is easier to open if it freezes up a bit. It also helps to leave them sitting with the lid down, that way the lid is less likely to freeze.

You will sweat while hiking. Doesn't matter how cold it is. You will sweat. If you wear the same under clothes you sleep in hiking, they will get damp. When you end the day and don't have yet another set to change into, your going to get chilled. I try to keep my hiking clothes on as long as possible at the end of the day in an effort to let body heat dry them out. But at some point, you just got to break down and change.

winger
11-22-2013, 09:14
For the OP: so what is the total weight of your gear/pack for your trip?

Another Kevin
11-22-2013, 09:29
You will sweat while hiking. Doesn't matter how cold it is. You will sweat. If you wear the same under clothes you sleep in hiking, they will get damp. When you end the day and don't have yet another set to change into, your going to get chilled. I try to keep my hiking clothes on as long as possible at the end of the day in an effort to let body heat dry them out. But at some point, you just got to break down and change.

"Don't sleep in wet clothes" is important, but far more important is "never hike in your only set of dry clothes." You will need the dry clothes to sleep in. For a short trip in temps that aren't pushing your sleeping bag's limit, sleeping in slightly damp unmentionables to let body heat dry them out works ok. You can get home and dry everything properly, and a couple of nights' worth of moisture isn't going to destroy the insulating value of your bag. If you're going to be out night after night in cold weather, then you have to think about some sort of vapor barrier to keep your bag dry, because even condensation will wet out the down eventually. I'm never out for that long in winter. (I'm never out for that long, period.) You can also try putting your damp baselayer between your sleeping pads (you use two in cold weather, right?) so that at least it won't freeze.

grayfox
11-22-2013, 13:22
Sounds like you haven't done any winter camping before so I'll base my coments on that assumption. There is a lot of good advice here--lithium batteries, two full length pads, don't sleep in damp clothes...so below is what I have learned:

Take real food-it won't spoil.
You don't have to wash your cook pot as there will be no bacteria growing in it. Just use snow to clean it.
A headlamp with a seperate battery pack that can be kept close to your body works better-spendy though.
Take high calorie snacks like cookies that will be easy to eat when frozen.
The jetboil will not be the best choice for melting snow-be careful and add your last water to the pot so it doesn't burn through.
A small candle lantern will warm your tent but be carefull.
Be ready and able to build a fire if the need arises-I know, you probably aren't supposed to but be ready anyway.
Take a friend.
Spend a night or two in a park campground to try things out before you head out on the trail.

Winter camping is the best for quiet solitude. Have fun and stay safe and warm.

Feral Bill
11-22-2013, 15:11
Sounds like you haven't done any winter camping before so I'll base my coments on that assumption. There is a lot of good advice here--lithium batteries, two full length pads, don't sleep in damp clothes...so below is what I have learned:

Take real food-it won't spoil.
You don't have to wash your cook pot as there will be no bacteria growing in it. Just use snow to clean it.
A headlamp with a seperate battery pack that can be kept close to your body works better-spendy though.
Take high calorie snacks like cookies that will be easy to eat when frozen.
The jetboil will not be the best choice for melting snow-be careful and add your last water to the pot so it doesn't burn through.
A small candle lantern will warm your tent but be carefull.
Be ready and able to build a fire if the need arises-I know, you probably aren't supposed to but be ready anyway.
Take a friend.
Spend a night or two in a park campground to try things out before you head out on the trail.

Winter camping is the best for quiet solitude. Have fun and stay safe and warm.

All good advice.

pawlinghiker
11-23-2013, 00:08
thanks for all the good advice.

I have done some winter camping at a lake called horseshoe lake, its in the great maine woods.

we slept in snow caves on a cliff. it was amazing.

that was over 20 years ago....

figure i can still do everything i did back then just a little slower ...

that was a preliminary list I will be refining and get pack weights shortly.

Thanks again for all the help Im sure I will have more questions as I go on...

russb
11-23-2013, 06:49
Bring/wear sunscreen.

ULterEgo
11-24-2013, 14:30
seems like you might want to take more than you "might" need on this trip and learn from your own experience what to leave at home on your next winter trip

JAK
11-24-2013, 20:38
just a few comments:
Jet boil & extra fuel = have an option for burning wood if needs, and melting snow if needed
2 32 oz water bottle = ideally metal so you can heat them if frozen, and ideally wide-mouthed
2 head lamps = candle lamp or vegetable oil lamp also, to save batteries and keep you company
Polarized sunglasses = plastic frames for warmth

I recommend 1oz of clothing for every 1 deg F below say 85 of 90 deg F. That doesn't include footwear and rain and wind shells. It should be layered so you can wear it all at once when it is coldest planned for. Also when wearing it all at once it should cover the body evenly, but third pair of socks can be worn as overmitts. It is ok to have up to 4 layers in some places, as long as everything layers loosely without compressing. 2-3 layers is less encumbering, but you will probably never have to wear it all at once as that is only the coldest temperature planned for so most of the time you will be delayered in various ways.

pawlinghiker
11-24-2013, 20:53
i will be adding a camp axe to my list for sure, just have not found one I like, all seem heavy, I guess it has to be..

Thanks again for any input..

Another Kevin
11-24-2013, 22:25
Why don't you come along for at least part of 1azarus's outing on Martin Luther King weekend in Harriman? That's a hop, skip and a jump for you to get to. There will be a huge group - enoough that we'll probably wind up splitting into multiple parties - so if anyone gets into trouble, there will be a lot of help. You can see how everyone else does things, pick up a few tips, and have a good time hanging out. The main route of the trip will be really short mileage. The speed demons can add loops, because Harriman has lots of sights to see.

Theosus
11-24-2013, 23:51
You will sweat while hiking. Doesn't matter how cold it is. You will sweat. If you wear the same under clothes you sleep in hiking, they will get damp. When you end the day and don't have yet another set to change into, your going to get chilled.

I always carry a spare set of "sleeping clothes" - dry shirt and underwear. If it's only an overnight hike, the sleeping clothes become the "hiking out" clothes the next day, and one synthetic shirt and underwear are light. I learned this after a particularly bad overnight, when I didn't take extras (it's only overnight, right?). My rain protection failed miserably and I wound up spending all day in a soaking rain at around 50 degrees. Everything I had to wear was sopping (I milked probably a pint of water from my fleece shirt in the shelter). I had to sleep in a wet shirt and wet underwear. By 3am when I woke up and had to pee my clothes were dry, but it would have been so much nicer to have something dry to start off with. Of course, we hiked out in the rain too, so I was glad to get to the car and put on my post-hike clothes in my dry after-hike bag. Learned a lot on that tripů

LDog
11-25-2013, 00:07
... Sure wish we could delete our posts ...

perrito
11-25-2013, 00:46
i will be adding a camp axe to my list for sure, just have not found one I like, all seem heavy, I guess it has to be..

Thanks again for any input..

Pricey, but by the best axe makers.
Gransfors Bruks Mini-Hatchet (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000WGVH04/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=115WF4AI522U9&coliid=I29LUI02KAEJO6)

Monkeywrench
11-25-2013, 09:09
Also, boil water and fill up a Nalgene bottle with your extra socks insulating or a reflectix cozy and sleep with it. Very warm!

I do this, but I don't boil the water, just heat it to somewhere between warm and hot. Boiling water is too hot! I'd burn myself sleeping with that.

One warm Nalgene down by your feet and one tucked into your belly make for a warm and cozy sleep.

I also keep some kind of snack in the bag with me (usually chocolate) so when I wake up cold in the wee hours of the morning I can have a drink and a snack which helps my body generate heat. I keep it in the bag so it isn't frozen and I can eat it.

winger
11-25-2013, 09:46
Pricey, but by the best axe makers.
Gransfors Bruks Mini-Hatchet (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000WGVH04/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=115WF4AI522U9&coliid=I29LUI02KAEJO6)


I have two Gransfors and I agree completely. But for occasional backpacking use, and to save a lot of money, the OP might want to consider one of the small Fiskars.

grayfox
11-25-2013, 12:44
My Small Forest Ax is my favorite camp ax...if I can figure a way to do it, I'm taking it with me into the afterlife! But I don't take it backpacking. I take a Sven saw--the short one. It can keep a fire going all night in the worst weather imaginable. My fixed blade knife will split any wood that I need to split, usually only to to get dry tinder at first. The other thing that people don't usually think of as a camp tool is the little hand pruners that often are in my pack when I use the small wood burner stove.

If you still think you need an ax: get one with a long handle-it is safer to use because when you miss the wood it will bury into the ground instead of your foot. A head weight of less than one and a half pounds is packable but more is a burden. Take a file and stone and a cover as well.

There is a real good book by Buck Tilton on fire and it's uses. I think it's title is The Complete book of Fire. A good read.

Feral Bill
11-25-2013, 13:36
I would think twice about bringing an axe, or even making fire. In your area wood is likely scarce, and I believe Connecticut bans campfires altogether. At least be prepared to stay warm without a fire.

bfayer
11-25-2013, 21:30
I think you will find a Jetboil becomes next to useless below 25F. If you are serious about winter camping an inverted canister stove like a MSR Windpro is more practical.

I love my Jetboils, but they have their limitations and cold weather is one of them. For example we were out this weekend in MD (stayed at Dahlgren's backpacker camp) and it was in the low 20s on Sunday Morning, we brought an old MSR windpro (not inverted canister), windpro II (inverteed canister) and Jetboil SOL.

Both the Jetboil SOL and the original windpro could barely heat water for hot cider and oatmeal. The Windpro II was running like a jet engine and boiling water as fast as we could refill the pots.

Yes there are things you can do to mitigate the effects of cold on a canister, but in winter a stove is essential safety equipment and it needs to work with out mitigation.

I still like my whisperlite for winter if I need to melt snow for water, but the windpro II has won my me over if water is not going to be an issue.

pawlinghiker
11-25-2013, 23:05
funny you say that ..

yesterday I thought I was out of fuel.

took 3 minutes and still was not boiling water.

figured it was the cannister, that sucks...

I dont like traditional stoves , is there a any options with a jet boil ? or is there something else thats good in the snow.

Had a whisper light 15 years ago and hated it

love the jet boil but will need to cook this winter.. what about a heat sheild for the jst boil ?

Sarcasm the elf
11-25-2013, 23:32
Maybe I'm just lucky, but I've had (relative) success with my jetboil in temperatures down into the teens.

Put cannister inside your jacket and let your body heat warm it up. Take it out immediately before use and place it on an insulating surface (wood or cardboard). Boil your water asap. If you need to boil more than two cups, repeat the whole process.

perrito
11-25-2013, 23:43
+1 What the elf said. I was about to post the same reply.

hikerboy57
11-25-2013, 23:58
Maybe I'm just lucky, but I've had (relative) success with my jetboil in temperatures down into the teens.

Put cannister inside your jacket and let your body heat warm it up. Take it out immediately before use and place it on an insulating surface (wood or cardboard). Boil your water asap. If you need to boil more than two cups, repeat the whole process.
+1 i use a pocket rocket.i put my can in my sleeping bag at night, bury it in my pack during the day, tuck it in my jacket while im getting my food together, shake the can for a half a minute or so and its worked for me down to the teens.

pawlinghiker
11-26-2013, 00:01
would it be safe to assume that new canisters work better than ones with a few boils on them ?

do MSR and Jet Boil canisters play with each other ?

hikerboy57
11-26-2013, 00:06
would it be safe to assume that new canisters work better than ones with a few boils on them ?

do MSR and Jet Boil canisters play with each other ?
yes.
and yes.

bfayer
11-26-2013, 06:21
Maybe I'm just lucky, but I've had (relative) success with my jetboil in temperatures down into the teens.

Put canister inside your jacket and let your body heat warm it up. Take it out immediately before use and place it on an insulating surface (wood or cardboard). Boil your water asap. If you need to boil more than two cups, repeat the whole process.

That is one of the ways to mitigate the problem, works fine until it doesn't. The colder it gets the less effective it becomes, also the colder it gets the more important it is to have an operational stove.

The SOL has a regulator that improves cold weather performance and is better than the Flash or ZIP (yes I have tested them side by side), but it is still limited by the pressure of the canister in cold temps.

One other option is getting a canister cozy and putting a disposable hand warmer in between the canister and cozy.

Still no matter what you do the Jetboil will never be a winter stove.

perrito
11-26-2013, 07:23
Here's a potentially stupid question. ..
Would putting the canister in a reflectix cozy with a hand warmer inside be a bad idea?

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hikerboy57
11-26-2013, 07:26
Here's a potentially stupid question. ..
Would putting the canister in a reflectix cozy with a hand warmer inside be a bad idea?

Sent via Tapatalk
another yes!!

bfayer
11-26-2013, 09:22
another yes!!

It actually works well when it not too cold. The disposable hand warmers cannot get hot enough even in warm weather to overheat a canister. They only get to about 150F max which is well below the safe storage temp of the canister. In real life there is not enough energy in the hand warmer to heat the canister more than a few degrees over ambient. That few degrees however is enough to keep the stove going in cold weather when it would otherwise quit working. People set their canisters in pans of boiling water all the time to do the same thing. The hand warmers just last longer.

People have been making canister cozies for as long as canister stoves have been around.

The best solution is to carry a winter stove, but if you are not going to, you need to have a plan to keep what you have working in the temps you will be hiking in.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4

hikerboy57
11-26-2013, 09:36
It actually works well when it not too cold. The disposable hand warmers cannot get hot enough even in warm weather to overheat a canister. They only get to about 150F max which is well below the safe storage temp of the canister. In real life there is not enough energy in the hand warmer to heat the canister more than a few degrees over ambient. That few degrees however is enough to keep the stove going in cold weather when it would otherwise quit working. People set their canisters in pans of boiling water all the time to do the same thing. The hand warmers just last longer.

People have been making canister cozies for as long as canister stoves have been around.

The best solution is to carry a winter stove, but if you are not going to, you need to have a plan to keep what you have working in the temps you will be hiking in.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
yeah,you're probably right, but i tend to err on the side of caution in the winter and im hiking alone. i just use a small piece of corrugated cardboard as an insulator so the can doesnt sit on the ground. i dont like the idea of surrounding the stove at all.and i always have enough dry non cook food available in case its too cold to use the stove.

Venchka
11-26-2013, 09:41
My collection of winter friendly stoves...

Primus Himalayan Multifuel Stove (burns just about anything combustible including gas canisters)

http://www.spiritburner.com/fusion/showtopic.php?tid/19863/post/last/

Coleman Peak 1 Apex, first version.

http://www.spiritburner.com/fusion/showtopic.php?tid/15817/post/new/#NEW

The Granddaddy of them all...SVEA 123

http://www.spiritburner.com/fusion/showgallery.php?fid/486/

I bought my SVEA 123 in a set with the SIGG Tourist cook set and don't have the small brass windscreen. Anybody have the brass windscreen for the SVEA 123 they would part with for a reasonable price?

Wayne

Venchka
11-26-2013, 09:46
Windscreen for the stoves above. Don't leave home without it.

http://store.primuscamping.com/backpacking-stoves/accessories/primus-windscreen-and-heat-reflector-set/

The Coleman Peak 1 Apex is the lightest of my 3 stoves by an ounce or 3.

Wayne

bfayer
11-26-2013, 11:05
yeah,you're probably right, but i tend to err on the side of caution in the winter and im hiking alone. i just use a small piece of corrugated cardboard as an insulator so the can doesnt sit on the ground. i dont like the idea of surrounding the stove at all.and i always have enough dry non cook food available in case its too cold to use the stove.

You said you use a pocket rocket? With an open type stove like that I understand the caution. With the Jetboil almost no heat gets down to the canister from the burner.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4

10-K
11-27-2013, 08:43
This site has a lot of good info: http://wintertrekking.com/

Mtn. Pants
11-27-2013, 09:55
These are all good comments- I've read each one. QUESTION: will you encounter steep icy sections of trail? It's a lot less fun without some form of ice traction (I learned the hard way- Yaktrax are not durable enough!)

hikerboy57
11-27-2013, 10:42
kataoola micro spikes.

Another Kevin
11-27-2013, 10:53
+1 on Kahtoola microspikes (my friends tell me Hillsound trail crampons are also good). My microspikes come along on every trip where there might be ice. A possible exception is if I'm bringing full crampons and ice axe. Which is to say, never in the last few decades. I wear microspikes to shovel my driveway.

Mtn. Pants
11-27-2013, 11:07
I head to Mt. Mitchell for winter backpacking and have encountered hundreds of yards of thick and steep ice (esp. Jan & Feb) Definitely considering a hiking crampon like Kahtoola K-10 or Hillsound Trail Pro.

Another Kevin
11-27-2013, 12:43
Hundreds of yards of thick and steep ice is beyond hiking crampons, generally. That would call for a mountaineering crampon like the Grivel G-10 or the Black Diamond Contact, and a mountaineering axe like the Black Diamond Raven, and the training to use them.

T.S.Kobzol
11-27-2013, 13:39
nice site. made me check out Asnes skis again. Boy do they have a beauty in their lineup: http://www.asnes.com/produkt/holmenkollen/

I am drooling and I found no one here who carries this ski. I know Neptune Mountaineering usually has some of their models in stock but they sure don't have this one.


This site has a lot of good info: http://wintertrekking.com/