Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28
  1. #1

    Default Quilts vs. Sleeping bags?

    So I'm relatively new to the backpacking world, having only done a few small weekend trips, and need some advice from some seasoned hikers. I've got most of my gear already and have relied on the advice of my parents and brother, all seasoned on the AT, primarily for most things, but I'm seeking advice from the community on sleeping systems specifically.

    You know how some people are picky eaters? Well, I'm a picky sleeper. I can only really comfortably sleep in the half army crawl position, which basically is stomach sleeping with your leg sticking out. That sleeping position doesn't lend itself well to any traditional sleeping bags I have seen, so I'm open to suggestions and would like advice.

    I have a Big Agnes Air Core sleeping pad, which is probably among the most comfortable without adding significant weight, but I'm not sure how to complete the sleeping system. I've been thinking quilt (specifically enLightened equipment Revolution 30*) because sleeping bags are too restrictive, but what should I be looking for?

    Additionally, has anyone used enlightened equipment quilts before? How durable are they? They only offer 10D nylon as a shell for their long length quilts, and I'm concerned it will rip too easily.

    Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-30-2012
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Age
    57
    Posts
    885
    Images
    8

    Default

    I am a barrel chested guy and bought a big agnes deer park 30, which is a 3lb down bag rated at 30 degrees, and it has I think an 80" shoulder area. Love the bag, but it takes up too much space in my pack, even when compressed.

    In the interests of going lighter, I am leaning towards an EE Revelation X 20 degree quilt. I have read numerous forum posts about how good their stuff is, and it's reasonably priced at about $225.

    I hate being in a mummy bag, and no way can I go lighter any other way than trying a quilt.

    I would get a Jacks R Better, but am afraid they are too narrow in the shoulders at 52" for their Sierra Sniveller which is meant for us ground dwellers. The EE one comes 56" wide

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-28-2007
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Age
    67
    Posts
    404

    Default

    I'm a quilt convert, using a hammock the majority of the time, but still occasionally use a tent and sleeping bag, but more often than not I grab a quilt.
    For quilts: Katabatic, Nunatak, JRB, Warbonnet, EE. When funds allow, I'm going with a Katabatic. EE quilts are well respected, I suspect their lower pricing may be secondary to lighter weight shell fabric you mention.

  4. #4

    Default

    I used a quilt on my thru this year (Zpacks 20*) and it worked amazingly well. Like you I'm a side/front sleeper and I enjoyed the freedom the quilt allowed me. I hate having hot feet so it was nice to be able to free my feet and hang them out.

    I also own a 0* EE and the build quality is fantastic and I don't forsee any durability issues.
    Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time -- Steven Wright

  5. #5

    Default Quilts vs. Sleeping bags?

    To me, quilts are the way to go.

    I use the golite 3 season quilt and a EE rev 20 degree.

    Although the EE is "hand made" I actually like my golite better.

    Reasons: I like the baffling on the golite better. The EE uses karo baffling which is kind of weird. The down shifts around much easier with this style of baffling. but it also allows you to control where you want the down to be.

    Second reason: I prefer the sewn foot box of the golite quilt. The EE has a zipper and cinch cord at the bottom which allows you to create a foot box if you so pleased. In theory it's a great idea but I kept waking up at night with cold feet to find that I had pushed my feet thru the cinch cord opening and allowed cold air to sneak in. The golite is just a more simple straight forward design.

    I'm pretty sure EE just came out with a quilt styled more like the golite though. Either way both quilts are top notch! It just depends on what features are important to you

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-16-2013
    Location
    Bloomington, IN
    Age
    62
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I'm a side sleeper who tosses and turns frequently thru the night and I love my EE RevX quilt. I will never go back to a traditional bag! I don't see any issues with the quality of material or craftsmanship of the EE quilt. Great value IMHO.

  7. #7
    Registered User Des's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-15-2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Age
    28
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Can't agree more on the EE RevX. As blue indian says, the Karo baffling is a bit odd after being used to systems that hold down in place harder, but I've gotten used to working with that and the benefits as a side sleeper are enormous.
    KBO, Ducky

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-29-2012
    Location
    Moorhead,Minnesota
    Age
    50
    Posts
    234

    Default

    I can only get to sleep in the exact position you describe. Once I am sleeping I begin tossing from belly to side to belly to other side continuously all night. I have back, shoulder and leg issues that keep me tossing and turning all night. I do this at home and on the trail, though sleeping hurts more at home.

    Purchasing my EE quilt has been the best thing I have done to improve my rest on the trail. The quilt allows me the freedom to move about. I love it. I find using a wider and longer quilt works best for me.

    Give it a try!

  9. #9

    Default

    I use my down bag 85% of the time in the winter as an unzipped "quilt" as it's rated to -15F and I sleep better when not cocooned. But it does something a quilt cannot do---zip up and get mummified. Yes, occasionally the temps dip to 0F or -10F and my bag has the ability to become a zipped up heat shield against the coldest nights. Therefore it's a dual purpose item and good from subzeros to 50F.

  10. #10
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO or Scottsdale AZ
    Age
    61
    Posts
    5,296
    Images
    2

    Default

    I can't say enough good things about my EE RevX quilt. I took mine out on a summer-long bike tour and it worked down to its rating in blowing snow in the North Cascades, as well as on hot nights in the Midwest when it was 95F at sunset. The various snap, tie and zipper features allowed me to "mummy up" when needed. Mine was long enough to pull over my head as a hood, too.

    One advantage that came clear was that I never had to wash it, since I never actually slept on it. A few minutes of sunshine once in a while kept it fresh the whole trip.

    I think the baffling is a good system, but you do have to pay attention to it every day. I allows you to shift down in both directions, so you can allow for cold feet or a cold torso if your legs don't get cold, for instance.

    The company offers a lot of custom options, they deliver on time, the price is competitive, and I hear their customer service is fine.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  11. #11
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,203
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Quilts are great in mild conditions, drafts are tolerable.
    The colder it gets, the worse it gets.
    Many draw the line for quilts at 20 F, including Andrew Skurka.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Quilts are great in mild conditions, drafts are tolerable.
    The colder it gets, the worse it gets.
    Many draw the line for quilts at 20 F, including Andrew Skurka.
    My point exactly.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-24-2013
    Location
    Fairfax, Califonria
    Posts
    1

    Default

    AkaMirage, EE makes the RevX quilt in long lengths, and they use a 30D shell for that model. I love mine.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-11-2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    50
    Posts
    158
    Images
    57

    Default

    I don't use quilts below 20 degrees, but my Nunatak has been down that low. It has straps so I just cinch it tightly around my sleeping pad. If it is very cold, I just snap close the top and burrow. I got the long for this reason. At this point, based on the performance of my current quilt, I may consider going with a lower rated quilt.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-06-2008
    Location
    Andrews, NC
    Age
    59
    Posts
    3,609

    Default

    I only use quilts in the warmer summer months when an occasional draft when I thrash about won't kill me. All other times, I'm warmly wrapped in my WM Megalite.

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-08-2012
    Location
    Taghkanic, New York, United States
    Posts
    2,839
    Journal Entries
    11

    Default

    I sometimes sleep as you described, I hate mummy bags. Most quilts have a tight mummy like foot box. I found a great solution for me:

    I started with a semi-rectangular bag (Sea to Summit), but found a 'quilt' at 1/2 the weight and at the same temp rating and switched at Hot Springs. The quilt is really what they call a 'top bag', made to mate with the neoair mat (Model is Haven, but that is discontinued). The great thing about that is it's wide footbox, it has to accommodate the mat and the feet. Most nights I didn't place the mat inside the bag giving me even more foot room. On rare occasion where I did need the full warmth I set it up properly, had a little less foot room but still enough (and more then the mummy bags - those bags are evil btw).

    Some people may have issues sleeping directly on the sleeping mat without the bag inbetweeen, but I have found that specifically the neo-air mat surface is far more pleasant to sleep on then other air mattresses, it almost has a skin like feel to it.

  17. #17

    Default

    I too have been pondering switching from bag to quilt. I keep getting stuck though on how I would keep my head/face/neck warm without the mummy hood. I can be sleeping warmly in my mummy bag, but if it's 40* or less, my head and face get really cold (even when I'm wearing a hood or hat), to the point of waking me up at night. Some nights I'll end up sleeping on my side with my face buried in the side of the mummy hood (i know my breath isn't good for the insulation, but it's the only way I can sleep sometimes). I don't want to sleep in a full on balaclava, so how do you quilt users keep the noggin warm?

  18. #18
    Registered User louisb's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-09-2012
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    165

    Default

    mak1277, check out the zpack down hood. Use one in my hammock and love it.

    --louis

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-28-2007
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Age
    67
    Posts
    404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mak1277 View Post
    I too have been pondering switching from bag to quilt. I keep getting stuck though on how I would keep my head/face/neck warm without the mummy hood. I can be sleeping warmly in my mummy bag, but if it's 40* or less, my head and face get really cold (even when I'm wearing a hood or hat), to the point of waking me up at night. Some nights I'll end up sleeping on my side with my face buried in the side of the mummy hood (i know my breath isn't good for the insulation, but it's the only way I can sleep sometimes). I don't want to sleep in a full on balaclava, so how do you quilt users keep the noggin warm?
    Some reason you don't like a balaclava? I use one and also, if its really cold, a Mountain Hardware cap. Been considering a down hood, but so far, as low as 20 degrees, haven't needed one.

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    Some reason you don't like a balaclava?.
    I just find them really uncomfortable and constricting. I only wear it when I'm awake and the cold is unbearable.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •