Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 45
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-28-2004
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Age
    57
    Posts
    11,116

    Default

    I think it makes sense to compare relative to body weight, but even more sense to compare to lean body weight. A slight improvement on this is to base everything on height, perhaps height squared to be more precise. So I would propose the following as a new standard. The great thing about standards, there are so many to choose from. Also, the following is for total weight on feet, skin out, not including body weight. Arguably you could include body weight, as a 2 pound pack with 100 pounds of excess body fat is hardly Super-Ultralight. Anyhow...

    Super-Ultralight: skin out weight (pounds) = height (feet) x height (feet) x 50% = 12 pounds for 5 foot, 15 pounds for 5'6", 18 pounds for 6 foot tall.
    Ultralight: skin out weight (pounds) = height (feet) x height (feet) x 60% = 15 pounds for 5 foot, 18 pounds for 5'6", 22 pounds for 6 foot tall.
    Light: skin out weight (pounds) = height (feet) x height (feet) x 80% = 20 pounds for 5 foot, 24 pounds for 5'6", 28 pounds for 6 foot tall.
    Norm: skin out weight (pounds) = height (feet) x height (feet) x 100% = 25 pounds for 5 foot, 30 pounds for 5'6", 36 pounds for 6 foot tall.
    Heavy: skin out weight (pounds) = height (feet) x height (feet) x 120% = 30 pounds for 5 foot, 36 pounds for 5'6", 43 pounds for 6 foot tall.
    SuperHeavy: skin out weight (pounds) = height (feet) x height (feet) x 150% = 37 pounds for 5 foot, 45 pounds for 5'6", 54 pounds for 6 foot tall.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-28-2004
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Age
    57
    Posts
    11,116

    Default

    Maybe 40% for SUL. Includes food and water though, so it depends on how far you need to go. Maybe it would include half of food and water. Whatever. You could also make it seasonally dependant but I think it makes more sense to go up a class or two for winter and down a class for mid summer. i.e. UL mid-summer, Light for Spring/Fall, Norm for Winter to 10F, Heavy for Winter to like -20F or lower.

  3. #23
    Registered User jdc5294's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-23-2011
    Location
    Fort Carson, Colorado
    Age
    28
    Posts
    247

    Default

    I'm 6'0", usually between 160-170 but on the trail I think I hovered around 140-145. I never went above 25 fully loaded out of town with water too, more often then not I was 18-20.
    There's no reward at the end for the most miserable thru-hiker.
    After gear you can do a thru for $2,000.
    No training is a substitute for just going and hiking the AT. You'll get in shape.

  4. #24

    Default

    I once saw a tent at Cabelas that weighed 6 pounds and it had the label "Ultralight Backpacking Tent" on the box.

  5. #25

    Default

    For me 25 to 30 lbs is just right, any thing under 25lbs is UL and any thing over 30 lbs is heavy, but this is just my personnal oppinion

  6. #26
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2002
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,433
    Images
    558

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    If you can lift the pack with one pinky, it's ultra light.

    If it takes one hand to lift, it's light

    It takes two hands and a knee, it's heavy.

    If takes a rope over a tree limb and pullys, it's ultra heavy.
    I like this!
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  7. #27
    -
    Join Date
    08-14-2005
    Location
    Fort Madison, IA
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,541

    Default

    heavy is any that is more than you carry - UL is less than you are willing to exist with, and of course just right is the same as you

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-04-2013
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    38
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Thank you all for your input. I'm not really planning on making any changes to anything I have, but this confirmed that weight is an obsession to some but isn't as critical as many make it out to be.

    I recently sought input for a sleeping pad on another thread and it seemed that most of the responses I got indicated that weight was the primary factor in their decisions. Well, for me it was a good night's sleep, even if that meant carrying some extra weight. So, I have a 2" thick pad and I'm very happy with it.

    Then I got to thinking about the other items I normally carry, and I've found that I tend to haul a lot of comforts that other folks would find blasphemous due to the "unecessary" weight. I wasn't sure just how out of the norm this was, but it doesn't appear to be as unique as some would make it out to be.

    Happy Hiking.

  9. #29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by marti038 View Post
    Thank you all for your input. I'm not really planning on making any changes to anything I have, but this confirmed that weight is an obsession to some but isn't as critical as many make it out to be.

    I recently sought input for a sleeping pad on another thread and it seemed that most of the responses I got indicated that weight was the primary factor in their decisions. Well, for me it was a good night's sleep, even if that meant carrying some extra weight. So, I have a 2" thick pad and I'm very happy with it.

    Then I got to thinking about the other items I normally carry, and I've found that I tend to haul a lot of comforts that other folks would find blasphemous due to the "unecessary" weight. I wasn't sure just how out of the norm this was, but it doesn't appear to be as unique as some would make it out to be.

    Happy Hiking.
    Bro you can ask any question you want on WB and get 20,000 different answers and some you might not want the fact is it's all up to you, you'r personnal preference, but for me if i don't use it every day i don't carry it except for my tent. Good Luck and Happy trails

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-04-2002
    Location
    Oriental, NC
    Age
    72
    Posts
    6,690
    Images
    31

    Default

    "Ultra light" and similar terms are deceptive unless you're doing a true FSO start-of-hike weight, with water (1 liter when water supply is no issue), but for me, without food, which varies depending on days planned. I've always considered 15# FSO to be ultra light, since I always carry 2# of water and 20# to be light. It also depends on the season/climate/altitude since clothing needs vary.

    The Weasel
    "Thank God! there is always a Land of Beyond, For us who are true to the trail..." --- Robert Service

  11. #31

    Default

    Those carrying less than me are reckless and those carrying more than me are stupid.

    (Once read that on here... Love it!)

  12. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-04-2002
    Location
    Oriental, NC
    Age
    72
    Posts
    6,690
    Images
    31

    Default

    "Ultra light" and similar terms are deceptive unless you're doing a true FSO start-of-hike weight, with water (1 liter when water supply is no issue), but for me, without food, which varies depending on days planned. I've always considered 15# FSO to be ultra light, since I always carry 2# of water and 20# to be light. It also depends on the season/climate/altitude since clothing needs vary.

    The Weasel
    "Thank God! there is always a Land of Beyond, For us who are true to the trail..." --- Robert Service

  13. #33

    Default

    If it costs under $50 at WalMart it is Heavy\
    If a similar item costs $100 then it is light
    If you buy it online or at an outfitter for $300 then it is utralite
    "the legs feed the wolf gentlemen, the legs feed the wolf" from the movie "Miracle"

  14. #34
    Registered User jdc5294's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-23-2011
    Location
    Fort Carson, Colorado
    Age
    28
    Posts
    247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TEXMAN View Post
    If it costs under $50 at WalMart it is Heavy\
    If a similar item costs $100 then it is light
    If you buy it online or at an outfitter for $300 then it is utralite
    That's actually pretty accurate
    There's no reward at the end for the most miserable thru-hiker.
    After gear you can do a thru for $2,000.
    No training is a substitute for just going and hiking the AT. You'll get in shape.

  15. #35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TEXMAN View Post
    If it costs under $50 at WalMart it is Heavy\
    If a similar item costs $100 then it is light
    If you buy it online or at an outfitter for $300 then it is utralite
    Yep, but not taking something you don't use/need is absolutely free.

  16. #36
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-02-2007
    Location
    DFW, TX / Northern NH
    Age
    62
    Posts
    7,708
    Images
    27

    Default

    Anything that can be found or seen in a hiker box between Springer and Neels Gap is "heavy".

  17. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-16-2011
    Location
    On the trail
    Posts
    3,769
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Anything that can be found or seen in a hiker box between Springer and Neels Gap is "heavy".
    Or along the approach trail.

  18. #38
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-30-2012
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Age
    58
    Posts
    885
    Images
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by marti038 View Post
    Thank you all for your input. I'm not really planning on making any changes to anything I have, but this confirmed that weight is an obsession to some but isn't as critical as many make it out to be.

    I recently sought input for a sleeping pad on another thread and it seemed that most of the responses I got indicated that weight was the primary factor in their decisions. Well, for me it was a good night's sleep, even if that meant carrying some extra weight. So, I have a 2" thick pad and I'm very happy with it.

    Then I got to thinking about the other items I normally carry, and I've found that I tend to haul a lot of comforts that other folks would find blasphemous due to the "unecessary" weight. I wasn't sure just how out of the norm this was, but it doesn't appear to be as unique as some would make it out to be.

    Happy Hiking.
    I am with you on the pad. I started off backpacking with the folding z foam pad, and I felt like crap, hips sore, shoulders sore. I decided 1 lb for a self inflating pad was well worth it, and now I sleep great on the trail. I cut the z pad off, and use a piece of it as a kneeling, sitting pad now, so at least it wasn't a total waste of money! lol

  19. #39
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2004
    Location
    Colorado Plateau
    Age
    45
    Posts
    11,002

    Default

    Partially because of this and similar threads, wrote some half-@ss remarks...

    http://www.pmags.com/backpacking-weight-mania
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
    Twitter: @pmagsco
    Facebook: pmagsblog

    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  20. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-16-2011
    Location
    On the trail
    Posts
    3,769
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mags View Post
    Partially because of this and similar threads, wrote some half-@ss remarks...

    http://www.pmags.com/backpacking-weight-mania
    that lake would only be cool to visit with an SUL pack. Anything heavier would suck.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •