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  1. #1

    Default Is a 20 degree quilt all I need

    Rather new to quilts....I have acquired a 20 degree HG Burrow and a 40 degree UQ Flightjacket quilts for upcoming season.

    Question: Did I overbuy? Is the 20 degree versatile enough for 3 season that I could put a couple hundred back in pocket by selling the 40 degree?

    I originally thought I wanted a lighter one for true summer so could get under for the comfy factor without "baking", but am rethinking to realize a quilt seems versatile enough I only need the 20 and it will universally serve 3 seasons?

    The weight difference is like 4 ounces so no tremendous saving there for the couple months that I could "safely " carry the 40 anyway,,,

  2. #2
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    I did the entire trail with a 20F rated bag/quilt sort-of-almost.

    I started with a 18F bag (close enough to 20), switched due to weight for a 20F quilt. In the warmer sections went to a blanket, well really a blankie, very light weight and small. Got my 20F quilt back and completed the AT with it. So for me the 20F is the sweet spot for a single bag for the trail. I would not want to go lighter, but due to how you use the quilt you can use it comfortable in warm weather too as you can make it very open.

    One consideration however is that you have full bug netting. If not then having to stay in a 20F bag/quilt to avoid being eaten alive in the hot season is no fun, so a lighter bag/quilt would be better then.

  3. #3
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
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    if the are both under quilts, and you are talking hammocks, you could do all with 20, but since i own 10 quilts i am not the one to ask about switching out or selling.
    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  4. #4

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    No, they are both top quilts.

    My additional thought was if I kept both I could have a true summer quilt, a three season "fringe" quilt and if I "stack" them I could have a winter quilt set up?

    I understand it works that way?, and even carrying both I would have a 2 1/2 pound winter-ish set up? And the flexibility of any combination thereof.

    Keep in mind that my "winter camping" is limited to like 10 and above. Even that is pushing it for me to go out there.

    Still more affordable for me as I already have both, and picked up the two quilt combo for under 300 bucks.

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    I bought a 20* for the reasons you stated. But I might end up with a 50* this summer. I do a lot of camping in the summer and it would be nice to cut my quilt weight and volume in half. Probably not necessary though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kayak karl View Post
    if the are both under quilts, and you are talking hammocks, you could do all with 20, but since i own 10 quilts i am not the one to ask about switching out or selling.

    How many hammocks you got????

  7. #7
    Registered User mudsocks's Avatar
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    You didn't specify how you intend on using the TQs. Will you be using in combination with an UQ in your hammock or will on a sleeping pad in a tent? What are the normal lows/high night temperatures expected where you will be staying? Have you used TQs before or is your experience with sleeping bags?

  8. #8

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    On the ground. In smd trekker tent. Really first experience with top quilts. Used the 20 at the end of last season meeting October early November, but it was completely temperature appropriate for it then.

    Generally speaking get out there between about late April early May and mid to late November in the New England area generally speaking New Jersey and north

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by William36 View Post
    On the ground. In smd trekker tent. Really first experience with top quilts. Used the 20 at the end of last season meeting October early November, but it was completely temperature appropriate for it then.

    Generally speaking get out there between about late April early May and mid to late November in the New England area generally speaking New Jersey and north
    It depends. (Don't you love that answer?)

    In 90+ degrees I still used my 20 degree quilt. (I sleep better with a blanket or some such.) I vented it a good bit. It was warm. But I was on a thru hike and I slept okay. I was pretty dehydrated when I woke up. However, my friend couldn't sleep at all because it was so hot. She has a 20 degree sleeping bag.

    So, my answer is a definite "maybe." I can use a 20 degree from spring through fall. You may be able to as well.

    Edit: At the time I was sleeping in a tent, not my hammock.
    Merry 2012 AT blog
    "Not all those who wander are lost."

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    Registered User aclawrence's Avatar
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    Does your burrow have the sewn foot box or the snaps? If you do have the snaps you can open it up and use it more like a blanket. It would be a little cooler this way, then when it gets cold just close it back up. I have a 20* burrow with the snaps on the footbox and I just got in the mail today the burrow that I ordered for my wife. It's also a 20* and has a sewn footbox. Hers is also the new argon material and I am jealous.

  11. #11
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    Is a 20 degree quilt all I need?

    This is all you need.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VbI5zcB8Ac

  12. #12

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    Stick with the 20*. Being as it is a quilt it should be adaptable enough for the warmer weather too.

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