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  1. #1

    Default Perfect backpacking camera...

    Well, it may not be perfect, but for a point and shoot, this is the closest thing I've seen. Its the new Fuji F10 camera. I know a professional that has this camera and loves it! The thing that would make it ideal for a backpacker is the fact that it has an ISO range from 80-1600 !!! This is quite a feat for a point and shoot. Not only does it have this incredible range of iso...it manages to do it with very acceptable noise at all levels. The noise at 800 iso is very clean and at 1600 iso, its very acceptable. Backbackers on the AT are frequently in low light situations and this camera would really shine.

    In addition, you can take 640x480 movies at 30 frames per second...limited only by the size of the xd card. 640x480 is good enough quality for a home movie...maybe even a small documentary if your talented.

    Check out www.dpreview.com for a very impressive review of this camera.

    Whats also impressive is the price. It can be had for between $300 and $400 dollars!
    There is a certain joy in exhaustion.

  2. #2
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    Except that it weighs 6.7 ounces (with batteries).

    I got some great shots over my last hike with my 4.2 ounce Pentax Optio S5i, but I would have probably bought the new waterproof version (Option WPi at 4.8 ounces) if it had been available at the time. I had very good luck with the point-and-shoot mode, although the ISO range isn't nearly as broad. The only time I had a problem with low light was trying to take a picture of two inquisitive deer who were checking out my campsite from 20 yards at dusk one evening. Needless to say, the flash scared them off and the picture didn't come out.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  3. #3

    Default

    Yes, 6.7 oz is heavy compared to what else is out there, however, if you care
    to consistently create images that have professional quality (especially in low light situations)...this camera is a valid trade off over carrying 10 pounds of digital SLR gear...I've done it and the image quality made the extra weight worth it. Of course, I am a professional photographer by trade so obviously my priorities in image quality are much different than the average ultralight enthusiast. I prefer to be "as light as I can go" and still get image quality thats very close to my digital SLR.

    P.S. Many of my all time best images were photographed in very low light...either early in the morning or late in the evening. Possibly even in the middle of the night. Just like the other evening photographing the northern lights in MN. My little Pentax Optio S4i wouldn't have stood a chance of getting the images made by my Digital SLR.
    There is a certain joy in exhaustion.

  4. #4
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    Cool! Very interesting picture.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

  5. #5
    Registered User bulldog49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerosene
    Except that it weighs 6.7 ounces (with batteries).

    I got some great shots over my last hike with my 4.2 ounce Pentax Optio S5i, but I would have probably bought the new waterproof version (Option WPi at 4.8 ounces) if it had been available at the time. I had very good luck with the point-and-shoot mode, although the ISO range isn't nearly as broad. The only time I had a problem with low light was trying to take a picture of two inquisitive deer who were checking out my campsite from 20 yards at dusk one evening. Needless to say, the flash scared them off and the picture didn't come out.

    I guess for wimps like Kerosene, 2.5 ozs would make a difference
    "If you don't know where you're going...any road will get you there."
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    well, actually, he was willing to carry the 4.8 ounce model (1.9 ounce difference)

  7. #7
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    Those ounces really start to add up guys (but yes, I've become a wimp as I've gotten older).

    In this case, the form factor makes a difference also. I was able to stuff my Optio in my pocket while hiking and not even realize it was there. The 6+ ounce cameras are just large enough and just heavy enough that you can't really do that.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

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