WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
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  1. #21
    Registered User cliffdiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drybones View Post
    Large cast iron skillet left on a stump....guess the guy decided to go multralight. Also came upon a good tent that was set up and abondoned in the trail, had only a sleeping pad inside, guess the hiker decided to go home, was somewhat worried about the owner but didn't know what I could do.
    I encountered multiple abandoned tents on my attempt last year. I had no idea on the protocol for this, but I usually called out to see if anyone was still in the area. It probably bothered me more than it should have.

  2. #22

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    The strangest thing is people that really dont belong there. Dont have the right gear, dont know where they are going, dont have a plan.

    Met a woman in Stover Creek shelter, all her stuff was wet from the day/night before when it rained. All cotton. Sleeping bag, clothes, etc. Walmart backpack. She had spent the night there alone. So all her stuff was hangin and dryin all the next day. She slept on the shelter floor without a sleeping pad of any kind under her. She had hiked in a full 2.8 miles from the Springer FS42 parking lot (leisurely downhill) , and wanted to know how far it was to Springer. When I told her 3.8 miles behind her, she wanted to know how far it was to NC, and if the trail got any harder? Said she was out there because...she didnt have anywhere else to be. Some people make you wonder why, what are they planning, did they come out there to commit suicide or something?

  3. #23

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    If anyone finds my silver bubble-wrap cozy between Elk Pen and Fingerboard Shelter (NY), hand made for me by Another Kevin, please let me know. It fell off my pack one dark, cold night....
    ...the maddest of all is to see life as it is, and not as it should be. Cervantes

  4. #24
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    Met a guy from Europe carrying an very old looking fancy teapot he found on the trail in TN/NC. Looked a little bit like the talking one from Beauty and the Beast. So technically I didn't find it, but it was very interesting.

  5. #25

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    A curling iron.

  6. #26
    Registered User wcgornto's Avatar
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    In 2009, I saw Minnesota Smith at a road crossing in Vermont.

  7. #27

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    A very small, maybe 8x8, one room geodesic dome, about 80 yards off the trail in Va. It was unlocked with a sign on the door saying make yourself at home...please leave the place as you found it. I did and I did. Poured rain for two days straight....talk about trail magic.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by wcgornto View Post
    In 2009, I saw Minnesota Smith at a road crossing in Vermont.
    we have a winner.

  9. #29
    Registered User Drybones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Mountain Edward View Post
    A curling iron.
    It totally ruined my hike when I lost that curling iron.

  10. #30

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    While doing trail maintenance on Glastenbury Mountain I once found a sword in Goddard Shelter. The hilt was quite intricate and I wanted so much to take it home for my son. But as I was carrying gear and tools I just couldn't take it with me and work at the same time. I still regret not making more an effort to take it.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by daddytwosticks View Post
    Found a mylar birthday balloon partially deflated hung-up in a laurel bush once while hiking around the Standing Indian Loop. I always wondered how far that sucker drifted before coming to rest at that spot on the trail.
    I saw dozens of these balloons in the PCT. they should be outlawed
    .image.jpg

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drybones View Post
    It totally ruined my hike when I lost that curling iron.
    Right next to my hair dryer. HaHa

  13. #33
    Wanna-be hiker trash
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malto View Post
    I saw dozens of these balloons in the PCT. they should be outlawed
    .image.jpg
    I completely agree, when Mylar balloons land up in the ocean sea turtles mistake them for jellyfish and eat them. Usually this kills them.

    I'm curious to know how many times you have run into the remains of Chinese sky lanterns while hiking. I can't believe that those little flying firebombs are still legal.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  14. #34
    Wanna-be hiker trash
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmyjam View Post
    Now down in Georgia I have found a couple of full size pillows but this morning I was 2 miles into my hike north of Rockfish Gap and came across a new construction hardhat laying in the snow in the middle of the trail. I'm wondering who hikes with a hardhat? Maybe the 3 knuckleheads that were rescued from GSNP have invaded the SNP? I mean blow torch, hardhat they kind of go together. Ha Ha.

    Attachment 25616
    If there are any caves in the area, it is possible that a spelunker was using it as a caving helmet. Other than that I'm at a loss.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  15. #35
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
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    Teacher, I have your cozy. I unpacked and found two. I must have picked yours up by mistake at Fingerboard.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  16. #36
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarge95 View Post
    a crashed plane beside the trail in the smokey mtns and a hay baler by the trail in new england far out in the woods.
    There are plane parts in New England woods - pre dating Lindburg -known to some 100 year old locals today there in the woods is just the engine. It has been stumbled on once before - but the person could not retrace his steps. Hope you have a good GPS.

    Disappearance of L'Oiseau BlancOn 8–9 May 1927, Charles Nungesser and François Coli attempted to cross the Atlantic from Paris to the USA in a Levasseur PL-8 biplane L'Oiseau Blanc ("The White Bird"), but were lost.

    800px-Carte_postale-Oiseau_blanc-1927.jpg
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  17. #37
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    If there are any caves in the area, it is possible that a spelunker was using it as a caving helmet. Other than that I'm at a loss.

    Uh no light?
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  18. #38
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wcgornto View Post
    In 2009, I saw Minnesota Smith at a road crossing in Vermont.
    Too Funny...

    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    The strangest thing is people that really dont belong there. Dont have the right gear, dont know where they are going, dont have a plan.

    Met a woman in Stover Creek shelter, all her stuff was wet from the day/night before when it rained. All cotton. Sleeping bag, clothes, etc. Walmart backpack. She had spent the night there alone. So all her stuff was hangin and dryin all the next day. She slept on the shelter floor without a sleeping pad of any kind under her. She had hiked in a full 2.8 miles from the Springer FS42 parking lot (leisurely downhill) , and wanted to know how far it was to Springer. When I told her 3.8 miles behind her, she wanted to know how far it was to NC, and if the trail got any harder? Said she was out there because...she didnt have anywhere else to be. Some people make you wonder why, what are they planning, did they come out there to commit suicide or something?
    Yup, We met a lady at No Businnes Knob Shelter.. sounds like the same person. She talked the same way & asked similar questions. She just came right out and said she wanted to die out on the trail. She had the strangest gear, food & all. Meeting people like that is tough.. really tough.

    Quote Originally Posted by Another Kevin View Post
    Teacher, I have your cozy. I unpacked and found two. I must have picked yours up by mistake at Fingerboard.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    Oh Yay... mystery solved! :>)

  20. #40
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    I grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains. After graduating I lived in northern CA for about twenty years. Mendocino county to be exact and my job was on the coast at least once a week. I worked for the DA's office as a Victim Witness Advocate. I had to drive on Hwy 20 from Willits to Fort Bragg on the coast. I loved hiking but all the people I talked to when I first arrived warned me to refrain from hiking in the mountains and if on a trail don't veer off the trail for any reason. On my drive on Hwy 20 I would spot quite a few cars parked on the side of the road. Mind you, there was no one in sight in either direction and the only way for anyone to walk anywhere else but the road was straight up or straight down in heavily wooded areas. My first thought was to stop and see if anyone was in trouble. I'm glad I didn't. Alot of people disappear every year because they wander into marijuana grows in the middle of the National Forest. Same thing goes for the Appalachian Trail, George Washington National Forest etc. Now, data shows that the Emerald Triangle in northern CA is no longer the largest producer of marijuana. It's the big four states in the Appalachians. Tennessee, VA, NC, and Kentucky. If you see something suspicious or marijuana plants, don't be stupid or greedy. Walk away from there fast and report it as soon as you see law enforcement. Growers are now cartel employees for the most part and they mean business. The grows are commonly booby trapped to maim or kill and they commonly have a guard and/or caretaker. Just useful information.

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