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Thread: ground cloth

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    Default ground cloth

    I have a double garage door piece of tyvek was planning on using part of it for a tent ground cloth. It would weigh about 7 oz. under a Big Agnes fly creek 2. I understand there are lighter options, window shrink wrap sticks to itself, and does not look very durable, but I may be wrong. I would appreciate you opinion about best material for tent ground cloth.

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    I use the window film and never found a problem of it sticking together.

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    Registered User Drybones's Avatar
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    I'd go with the Tyvek...wash it first to make it quieter and more pliable.

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    I use the heaver tyvek - custom cut to fit my Carbon Reflex - I also have one for my Six Moons - - it also doubles as something to sit on - tyvek is really great and beats any footprint that I know of on the market - - getting wet by water wicking "through" your tent floor is always more common than through the seams - my tyvek system is bullet proof dry (so far)

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    1 piece of polycryo window film lasted me the entire CDT. Sticking was not a problem. Most ultralight backpackers are using window film nowadays. Why carry something that weighs 6 oz. extra but has zero extra functionality?

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    Emergency blanket(s). Cheap and very effective.

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    I bought 2 yards of tyvek used for making kites that weighs 4.2 oz. . It measures 5' x 6' .It's very soft but durable!
    I bought it on Amazon. It's sold by Into the Wind!

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    what about polycryo durability?

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    Never used polycryo but Tyvek also has insulating properties and can be used as something below your sleeping pad in shelters to keep you warm(er) and to help protect your pad. Or for when you're going lightweight and have a floorless shelter with you and your pad is right on the ground, it helps in the same way too. I know it makes a difference in that last scenario when there's snow on the ground.
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    The lightest option is carrying nothing. I stopped carrying a ground cloth (when I carry a tent) about 10 years ago and have yet to notice any problem with that.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

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    Registered User Old Hiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nu2hike View Post
    I bought 2 yards of tyvek used for making kites that weighs 4.2 oz. . It measures 5' x 6' .It's very soft but durable!
    I bought it on Amazon. It's sold by Into the Wind!
    +1. Did the same and I'm happy with what I got. I got 3 yards and was going to cut it to fit my SoLong 6, but I just double it over instead. Light and no noise.
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    its just extra weight you dont need it

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    Big Agnes sells a footprint for this tent that weighs 5 ozs. The same size in Tyvek should weigh close to the same. I use window shrink wrap. Mine weighs 1.75 ozs, including the elastic i installed to attach it to the stake webbing at the corners. This makes it much easier to set up when its windy. It has held up fine so far, and no, it does not stick together. Packs smaller than the stock footprint too.
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    Gossamer Gear Polycro Groundcloth--light and words great....1.7 oz.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry7 View Post
    its just extra weight you dont need it
    I was under the impression that as a vapor barrier, Tyvek or poly would help reduce condensate inside single walled tents. No?

    I carry Tyvek. Even when I hammock, I have my Tyvek.

  16. #16

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    Maybe I can ask a stupid question that will help the OP. Do lightweight tent makers waterproof the floor? I don't know because I haven't bought one yet. But it seems to me that the ground cloth choice would depend entirely on the kind of floor the tent has. Tyvek is not compeltely water proof, just resistant. So if you are tenting in a semi wet area where the ground is completely soaked how does a tent not end up full of water?

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    My groundcloth is mostly used to keep the tent floor free of mud and dirt. The dirty/wet groundcloth is easier to deal with (and dry) than the floor of the tent.

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    Garlic
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboPants View Post
    Maybe I can ask a stupid question that will help the OP. Do lightweight tent makers waterproof the floor? I don't know because I haven't bought one yet. But it seems to me that the ground cloth choice would depend entirely on the kind of floor the tent has. Tyvek is not completely water proof, just resistant. So if you are tenting in a semi wet area where the ground is completely soaked how does a tent not end up full of water?
    This is from the tarptent.com FAQ section:
    It depends on the conditions you expect to encounter and your style of camping. The sewn-in flooring is remarkably tough and does not usually require a separate groundsheet. We just never see floors come back for repair. Tyvek groundsheets are very tough and great for sleeping out or taking a break but generally heavier than you need just for floor protection. For use on very rocky ground and desert conditions where puncture wounds are possible, a light--2 mil plastic is fine--floor protector will do the job.Silnylon will soak through when pitched on saturated ground, so I don't do that. And you're right, Tyvek doesn't help in that regard. I've never had a problem finding a well-drained site within a mile or so of when I decide to stop hiking.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

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