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A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
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  1. #1

    Default Best Appalachian Trail Book

    What is the best book about the Appalachian Trail that you have read? The kind of book that you didn't want to put down until you finished.

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    "A walk in the woods".
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

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    The Barefoot Sisters, both books.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

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    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    The best AT book is ALL dozen that I've read....

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    Registered User MkBibble's Avatar
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    I have read several that I really enjoyed. These come to mind: Skywalker by Bill Walker; Three Hundred Zeroes by Dennis R. Blanchard; Walking the Appalachian Trail by Larry Luxenberg; and Just Passin' Thru by Winton Porter. Of course these two as well: A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson (really more for the humor…); Walking with Spring by Earl Shaffer (I think it’s required reading – somebody correct me if I’m wrong).

    For years my favorite was AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller, but having just finished Becoming Odyssa by Jennifer Pharr Davis, I would put it at least on par with AWOL. Obviously, just my opinions; your mileage may vary.

  7. #7
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    On The Beaten Path: Perhaps my favorite book on hiking the Appalachian Trail. Treating the AT what it is like for many of us..a pilgrimage in the mountains.

    The Appalachian Trail Reader: My copy of this book is very dog eared. This book collects writings on geology, history and the culture surrounding the AT. It also features musings on the the trail and the Appalachians in general from the raw, but powerful voices, of everyday hikers to the eloquent musings of Thoreau and Wendell Berry. Highly recommended.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
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    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

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    Don't overlook Then the Hail Came by George Steffanos. Online only.

    Rain Man

    .
    [I]ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: ... Defile not therefore the land which ye shall inhabit....[/I]. Numbers 35

    [url]www.MeetUp.com/NashvilleBackpacker[/url]

    .

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    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    What is the best book about the Appalachian Trail that you have read? The kind of book that you didn't want to put down until you finished.
    As Far As The Eye Can See

    Crazy Larry

  10. #10

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    AWOL on the Appalachian Trail, but then I've only read a few.

  11. #11
    A♣ K♣ Q♣ J♣ 10♣ Luddite's Avatar
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    The only one that didn't bore me to tears was Bill Bryson's A walk in the Woods, the book most AT hikers hate. All the others I've read were either poorly written, used the word "spiritual" one too many times, or was just plain boring. Hiking is one of those things that is fun to do and boring to read about, IMO.
    Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit, and as vital to our lives as water and good bread.
    -Edward Abbey

  12. #12

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    Agreed
    AWOL on the Appalachian Trail by David Miller, Becoming Odyssa by Jennifer Pharr Davis
    and the Barefoot Sisters, book one.
    For a couple of bucks, get a weird haircut and waste your life away Bryan Adams....
    Hammock hangs are where you go into the woods to meet men you've only known on the internet so you can sit around a campfire to swap sewing tips and recipes. - sargevining on HF

  13. #13

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    Barefoot Sisters - both books. I really would like to meet them, and have a long conversation with them. Anyone know what they're doing now?

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    Registered User tickspit's Avatar
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    Becoming Odyssa by Jennifer Davis is an easy read.

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    I like various things about various books - can honestly say that I've read most of the available books out there (Amazon is my friend!) - I really enjoyed Three Hundred Zeros - Blanchard had a great adventure, and described it with kindness, humor and drama where appropriate. I think it was well-written, and dear to my heart - well edited. Too many of the books out there, especially on the Kindle, seem to have no editing done at all, and are rife with spelling and grammatical errors. I know most people don't seem to care about it these days, but I guess I'm a bit of a snob when it comes to that.

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    Read almost all of the above, plus "Ten Million Steps" by Nimblewill Nomad. All pretty great books, but I have to say "Three Hundred Zeroes" is still my favorite.


    "Your comfort zone is a beautiful place, but nothing ever grows there.
    "


  17. #17
    ...Or is it Hiker Trash? Almost There's Avatar
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    As a former history teacher I have to say I am really enjoying "Hiking the Appalachian Trail", two volume set. I like reading about how the trail was, just finished Dottie Laker's account, and really enjoyed her accounting. Reading Ten Million Steps right now. I think most are on par with one another, so it's a matter of interest. "A Walk for Sunshine" comes as an audio book, and isn't a bad listen. "Just Passin' Thru" is a good read, but knowing some of the folk in the book personally may have added greater enjoyment to me, however, I do think Winton does tell a good story.

    I think it really depends on what you're looking for.
    Walking Dead Bear
    Formerly the Hiker Known as Almost There

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    Registered User MkBibble's Avatar
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    I forgot about As Far As The Eye Can See. Another good one. Thanks TOW. Rain Man, I have started and stopped Then the Hail Came an number of times. I am not a fan of reading it on the computer... that's a shame too, because it really is a good story. Maybe I should just print out a couple chapters at a time and leave them in the "library" where I often read.

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    Registered User Mr. Clean's Avatar
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    "the barefoot sisters" and "and then the hail came".

    They are all pretty good, though.
    Greg P.

  20. #20
    LT '79; AT '73-'14 in sections; Donating Member Kerosene's Avatar
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    I enjoyed both of The Barefoot Sisters books and really liked the writing style: Southbound and Walking Home

    Noone has mentioned Model T's Walking on the Happy Side of Misery

    I thought that Jennifer Pharr Davis' first book, Becoming Odyssa, was well done and perfect for my new-to-backpacking 21-yo daughter. I have yet to read 46 Days.
    GA←↕→ME: 1973 to 2014

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