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  1. #1
    Totally harmless unless riled JLB's Avatar
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    Default Cashmere, anyone?

    I've been looking at insulating layers, and I have all kinds of fleece, but I remembered that when I went to Glacier Nat. Park a few years back, I used a fairly thin black cashmere sweater underneath my North Face shell, and it was amazingly warm and lightweight.

    I'm looking at the weight of all of my fleece options, and their warmth factor, and the cashmere is looking like a winner.

    Does anybody still wear wool as their insulating layer anymore? Has fleece taken over completely?

  2. #2
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    Yes, sure do....I have a montbell thermawrap which is lighter and more windproof, and a down jacket which is of course very warm...but somehow my old cashmere pullover, from Nordstrom's (actually somebody else got it from nordstrom's, I got it from Salvation Army) just seems so right under a shell...handles moisture better, feels less clammy, etc. Sheep may know something after all.

  3. #3
    Registered User soulrebel's Avatar
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    I've ditched my long sleeve capilene shirt base layer and opted for an Icebreaker long sleeve for a base layer. It weights 4oz more but the comfort, smell factor, and wicking properties are better than my silkweight capilene.

  4. #4
    Livin' life in the drive thru! hikerjohnd's Avatar
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    Default Durability?

    What about the durability factor? My wife has a cashmere blanket that fell apart (well, it pilled to the point it looked moth eaten) after a short time (less than a year maybe?) Is cashmere really that flimsy or did we get a dud blanket? Would it be durable enough for the punishment of a longer hike of a few weeks?
    So be it.
    --John

  5. #5

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    Cashmere isn't cheap and it's often imitated. A good quality sweater cost hundreds of $$ and should last for years if it's properly laundered. It's wool, but consider it high quality down compared to feathers.

  6. #6
    Registered User kyhipo's Avatar
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    Default cashmere ,anyone

    i will take wool for cold weather anyday when i was in the sierra Nevadas it was all the difference,i lose anything,great around the feet at night if i get cool ky,ofcourse i like the thicker wool verse cashmere
    Last edited by kyhipo; 09-06-2005 at 09:37.

  7. #7

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    I used a norweigan wool ragg sweater when I thru'd in 88 and wool was in the distinct minority even back then. Can't imagine that anyone other than an occasional weekender would choose wool over fleece today.

  8. #8
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    Default

    Don't use wool or fleece.

    For the past 4 years or so, been using a lined windshirt. Water resistant, wind proof, amazingly warm for the weight, good for active hikers. In other words, don't wear a lined windshirt for hanging around camp.

    Depending upon your hiking style, it may or may not suit your needs.

    I used to use a Marmot DriClime windshirt, but after getting much duct tape, pin holes and being worn..time to replace.

    Now use the Montbell one. It is less expensive and lighter than the Marmot! 10 oz for men's large.

    Use it not only for hiking, but also for skiing, snowshoeing, biking and it is my all around favorite piece of gear. If you go over to PCT land, it is by far the the most popular type of garment.

    Check it out:
    https://www2.montbell.com/america/as...hinban=2306320
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
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    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

  9. #9
    Totally harmless unless riled JLB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyhipo
    i will take wool for cold weather anyday when i was in the sierra Nevadas it was all the difference,i lose anything,great around the feet at night if i get cool ky,ofcourse i like the thicker wool verse cashmere
    I'm looking at a thin cashmere sweater, topped with a Western Mountaineering Flight Vest, and a North Face shell.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by JLB
    I'm looking at a thin cashmere sweater, topped with a Western Mountaineering Flight Vest, and a North Face shell.
    Add a bolo tie to that, and you'll be the cat's meow.

  11. #11
    Registered User Fiddleback's Avatar
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    It's hard to beat a light wool base layer. I have a SmartWool shirt that is just super...light, soft, cool in moderate heat, warm in the cool...wicks great.

    And expensive.

    FB
    "All persons are born free and have certain inalienable rights. They include the right to a clean and healthful environment..."

    Article II, Section 3
    The Constitution of the State of Montana

  12. #12
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    I've brought wool sweaters ( not cashmere ) on hikes from late October to May in my area. I like synthetics, and fleece, but wool is warm and wool looks smart!
    I think wool breathes and wicks better, too.

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