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  1. #1
    Registered User FarmerChef's Avatar
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    Default Frogg Toggs UltraLite 2 - Jacket or Poncho?

    Heretofore I've used the disposable ponchos as a combo rain poncho for me and pack cover in the rain. The added benefit of the pack under the poncho was that it created natural ventilation. Still, those little plastic ponchos are a sweat box and durability, well, even being careful the best I can do is a couple of days.

    Now I'm looking for something cheap (I have to buy 6) for an upcoming spring section hike that I predict will be wet. Does anyone have an opinion one way or the other regarding the Frogg Toggs Ultralight 2 Jacket versus the poncho?

    I don't think I'd use the rain pants as I'd just sweat them out. Yuck. Might sew myself a simple rainskirt out of some left over M90 but a jacket is beyond my skills.
    2,000 miler. Still keepin' on keepin' on.

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    I just went through two days of rain and the ultralight 2 kept me dry. If you can buy it as a set at a really good price you might want to consider buying the set. You can cut the pants into shorts and use the remaining pieces for stuff sacks. I've never used a poncho, so Im no help there.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmax View Post
    I just went through two days of rain and the ultralight 2 kept me dry. If you can buy it as a set at a really good price you might want to consider buying the set. You can cut the pants into shorts and use the remaining pieces for stuff sacks. I've never used a poncho, so Im no help there.
    Is the sizing as horrible as the regular Frogg Toggs? I know they're made to fit over other layers, but sheesh... I could fit of my torsos in one jacket.

  4. #4

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    another one of*

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerChef View Post
    Heretofore I've used the disposable ponchos as a combo rain poncho for me and pack cover in the rain. The added benefit of the pack under the poncho was that it created natural ventilation. Still, those little plastic ponchos are a sweat box and durability, well, even being careful the best I can do is a couple of days.

    Now I'm looking for something cheap (I have to buy 6) for an upcoming spring section hike that I predict will be wet. Does anyone have an opinion one way or the other regarding the Frogg Toggs Ultralight 2 Jacket versus the poncho?

    I don't think I'd use the rain pants as I'd just sweat them out. Yuck. Might sew myself a simple rainskirt out of some left over M90 but a jacket is beyond my skills.
    i use both -- the suit in the winter, the poncho in the summer. i waffle in the spring and fall. if early spring, like when i hike next week, i will bring the frogg togg pants and jacket, since i use them to stay warm in the evening, too -- and they perform quite well, in my opinion. come may 1st or so, i opt for the poncho. if you find a place that will ship in 4 or 5 days you could check the forecast and see how cold it was going to be!!! good luck to you and your five best friends.
    Lazarus

  6. #6
    Registered User FarmerChef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chall View Post
    Is the sizing as horrible as the regular Frogg Toggs? I know they're made to fit over other layers, but sheesh... I could fit of my torsos in one jacket.
    I've heard it runs at least a size large. Problem is I can't find a guide to tell me what size I should consider myself. Still, I think I'd order a small for my wife and a medium for me. The kids will probably need Polly Wogs or they'll swim in the adult sizes.
    2,000 miler. Still keepin' on keepin' on.

  7. #7
    Registered User 78owl's Avatar
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    wallie world carries the Frogg Toggs

  8. #8
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    ... about the size thing. it is really easy to just cut the sleeves and legs shorter, and the looser the fit the more air/breathability. not to mention we all look pretty stupid hiking, anyway... also, the bigger the jacket the easier to wear all your other stuff underneath. so, no harm done, really, if they are the big side.
    Lazarus

  9. #9
    Registered User FarmerChef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1azarus View Post
    ... about the size thing. it is really easy to just cut the sleeves and legs shorter, and the looser the fit the more air/breathability. not to mention we all look pretty stupid hiking, anyway... also, the bigger the jacket the easier to wear all your other stuff underneath. so, no harm done, really, if they are the big side.
    Are we talking big enough to fit a pack underneath without the pants being so big that I can't keep 'em on?
    2,000 miler. Still keepin' on keepin' on.

  10. #10

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    I tried mine on in Wal-Mart prior to buying.

  11. #11
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    I can wear my daypack underneath, but can't zip it up. My pants are super baggy. But they don't really fall down when wearing my pack. The pack waistbelt takes care of that. .. I cut the legs last week before my hike and hemmed them up. I should have gone another inch or two. Back to the thread injector I go...

  12. #12
    NOBO toBennington, VT plus 187 mi in MH & ME
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    I use a dri ducks poncho
    http://www.amazon.com/Frogg-Toggs-Pa.../dp/B004707RK0
    with strings on the back corners tied around my waist to hold it on the pack. This eliminates most of the poncho flapping that annoy me so much. Works good.

    A hiker I saw last year had a pair of rain pants cut off at the knees. It seemed to work well to keep the pants dry (drier)

    I would only hike in frog's toggs suits in winter. It would be a sauna the rest of the year.
    Grinder
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  13. #13

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    This is a little off of the topic, but I thought that this looked like the best place to ask this.

    I like what I've read about the DriDucks Action poncho and the Ultra-Light2 poncho, but the official descriptions on the retail sites lack specifics. Can somebody who has two of these or uses two with a hiking partner tell me if the snaps can be used on two ponchos to form a larger area? Also, when I look at the photos, I don't see any grommets. I just see the snap buttons, but I assume that there are grommets for both the DriDucks Action and the Ultra-Light2? Can somebody tell me how many grommets there are and if the material seems strong enough to handle a setup for a vestibule using hiking poles, a couple of stakes, paracord for a roofline, and a couple of short bungees? If we couldn't use two, could we use one for a small overhang, at least? Also, I've read differing statements about the exact weight of these two models. Anybody have a confirmed weight? Thank you so much, in advance.

  14. #14

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    A little off topic but responding to the question.

    I believe that the Frogg Toggs Action Poncho is a tri-laminate (3 layers) and the Ultra-Light2 poncho is a Bi-laminuate (2 layers). The material is already thin enough that durability is a concern on the tri-laminate, I don't know how the UL2 would stand up but I have the Action Poncho and its 8.2oz (without the stuff sack). With the stuff sack its about 9oz. A little weight can be saved (1oz/28g) if you remove one cord lock on the poncho hood and consolidate the draw cord into a single cord lock. I don't know what the UL2 weighs but some googling suggests the DriDucks emergency poncho (single layer) weighs 2.8oz. I would hazard a guess that if a single layer is 2.8oz, and a triple layer is 8.2oz, then the dual layer would be about 5.6oz.

    Durability is the major concern, which is why I went with the Frogg Toggs triple layer over the dual layer. For 3oz I'd rather the assurance/insurance that it will hold up a little better. I have actually converted mine into a DIY version of the JacksRBetter Weather Shield. Total weight is now 11oz and it now does multi-duty :

    rain poncho while out walking
    hammock wind protection (either below or above)
    under quilt rain shell
    sleeping bag/top quilt rain shell
    hammock front porch/awning
    floor cover if I have to go to ground (emergency)
    tarp shelter (for the dog)
    sit pad when I stop for a break

    While I love my poncho, I realize they aren't for everyone. Some people want a jacket and pants. I actually feel that there is no right/wrong answer, they both work well in different situations. I pick my gear from a selection I have based on the trip I'm planning.

    Ponchos are great for warm weather hiking in the spring and summer since they breathe so well. However, in colder fall/winter weather I go with a Frogg Toggs rain jacket and pants.
    Also, Ponchos are great when the air is pretty still (since they breathe so well) but get a little wild if the wind kicks up and is blowing.
    Lastly, Ponchos are great when you're walking a trail, but they reduce visibility immediately under foot, so when climbing or navigating hairy areas I'd rather have a jacket and pants.

    For reference, I believe the Packa mediumX weighs in at 19oz.

  15. #15

    Default Packa Weights

    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyFeet View Post

    For reference, I believe the Packa mediumX weighs in at 19oz.
    The 10d Mediumx Packa weighs slightly less than 8 oz.
    The 33d Mediumx weighs slightly less than 13 oz.
    The eVent Packa doesn't come in mediumx, but a medium eVent weighs about 17 oz.
    CT

  16. #16

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    I use the Frogg Toggs Action Poncho, plus Zpacks' rain kilt. A "belt" made of shock cord will reduce the flapping of the poncho in windy conditions.

  17. #17

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    Thanks, DirtyFeet, Cedar Tree, and Gravitino. I appreciate your time and expertise. Probably going with two of these for me and the wife:

    Poncho Kelty Adult Rain Poncho, 39.5 L X 50.5 W, four grommets 8 oz.

    Just hard to go with a rain outfit when a poncho and some lightweight cord can provide a canopy for a tent.

  18. #18
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    You might consider a cheap wind breaker or such and an A line skirt from the thrift shop. cut them up for a pattern, add 1 ft. to the width of the skirt, some velcro and it's a nice wrap around, not sticking your muddy boots thru your skirt is nice. when you do the pattern don't forget to add 1/2 inch or so for seams

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