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  1. #1
    Registered User Monkeywrench's Avatar
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    Default Hundred Mile Wilderness Resupply Options

    I have a friend who is planning a 10-day section hike of the HMW, and he called me asking for advice on possible resupply options. Well, it was 5 years ago, during my thru-hike, that I last hiked the Wilderness, so I'm not sure what options currently exist, if any.

    Anyone want to chime in?
    ~~
    Allen "Monkeywrench" Freeman
    NOBO 3-18-09 - 9-27-09
    blog.allenf.com
    [email protected]
    www.allenf.com

  2. #2
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    Real men do HWM without resupply. Otherwise it wouldn't be the Hundred Mile Wilderness. I do know that White House Landing is closed this season.

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    We are in the early planning stages for the HMW. I think we'll take advantage of the services of Phil Pepin:
    http://100milewilderness.info/services/

  4. #4
    Registered User kofritz's Avatar
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    Monson sounds good. I have real of a plane ride from one end of the 100MW to the other with possible air drops for re-supply.

  5. #5
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    If you are going south bound, the AT Lodge in Millinocket has all you need, including parking for your car, lodging and shuttles to/from Baxter SP (to climb Katahdin), resupply in the HMW, and shuttles back from Monson when you are done.

    I'm using them for a south bound trip the first 2 weeks in August. Baxter reservations were a total pain so I'm spending a couple of nights with them and they will shuttle me to the park. Practically speaking, a summit attempt of Katahdin requires a whole day so you need at least a night somewhere.

    Good luck!

    http://appalachiantraillodge.com


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    Both Shaws and Lake Shore House in Monson will do a food drop at the apx. 50 mile mark. Last year Shaws was $70, Lake House was $20 but they needed 5 hikers to go in on it (so they want $100 to make it happen).

    Also the food drop is a 5 gallon bucket, so you may be able to split the cost and space of a single bucket (but for your planned 10 days you may need the whole thing).

  7. #7

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    On all my thru's i done the HMW without resupply 06 GA-ME i carried 7 days of food & 2012 GA-ME i carried 6 days both was plenty of food but on my 96 Flip-Flop i started with 10 days and wound up giving some it away before i left BSP, I would recommend you carry 7 days of food MAX without resupply with in the HMW. but their is people that will run a resupply box to you if you think you will need it as posted above.

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    Yah, I second the Phil Pepin post, 100 mile wilderness guy. He set me up for my SOBO thru and took excellent care of me. I got a ride from the airport, to his cabin, to the park, and he's very knowledgeable about the trail, not just the 100 mile wilderness.

  9. #9
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    Done it 3 times. Always hump my own food. Plus there are ways off if you bring a map and know how to read it. I humped 3 days without food in the Army. Than barely ate and humped 3 more with no food. Thousands of hikers have done that section without resupply. Nothing special about that.

  10. #10
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    It's usually a seven day walk with six nights food. You cross roads with traffic. If you have problems people hitch out all the time. It's not really wilderness remote anymore.
    Everything is in Walking Distance

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bamboo bob View Post
    It's usually a seven day walk with six nights food. You cross roads with traffic. If you have problems people hitch out all the time. It's not really wilderness remote anymore.
    I keep "+1" -ing you, Bob. I'm mostly a weekend warrior but HMW is easily done in seven days. In 1990 there was no appreciable traffic on those cross roads. In 2010, there was plenty. (Too bad!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by bamboo bob View Post
    It's usually a seven day walk with six nights food. You cross roads with traffic. If you have problems people hitch out all the time. It's not really wilderness remote anymore.
    We ran across an older guy (retired) in NJ last month who had attempted a thru in 2012, and had returned to finish what he had missed. When he got to Duncannon, it was 105 degrees. He decided he'd had enough of that, so he flip-flopped to Katahdin. Made it thru the HMW, then somewhere south of there he slipped on a bog bridge. His leg went between the boards, and broke (one bone). It was in-between NOBO and SOBO season for that area, so he saw no one. Had to hike out 7 miles on a broken leg. All is well until it's not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by illabelle View Post
    We ran across an older guy (retired) in NJ last month who had attempted a thru in 2012, and had returned to finish what he had missed. When he got to Duncannon, it was 105 degrees. He decided he'd had enough of that, so he flip-flopped to Katahdin. Made it thru the HMW, then somewhere south of there he slipped on a bog bridge. His leg went between the boards, and broke (one bone). It was in-between NOBO and SOBO season for that area, so he saw no one. Had to hike out 7 miles on a broken leg. All is well until it's not.
    Section hikers and SOBOs know about empty trail. I saw no other hikers whatsover between Caratunk and Monson in August 2001. I've had numerous stretches of 1, 2, or even 3 days without seeing another soul on the trail. It's sobering to consider how one might deal with a medical emergency in such circumstances.

    Weekdays, off-season, extreme heat/cold/rain/snow/mud/bugs -- rational people stay away. Only thru-hikers, dedicated section hikers and similarly deranged folks are found deep in the woods.

    Unfortunately (in my opinion) the Hundred Mile Wilderness has been tamed and civilized. Plenty of traffic on the intersecting logging and forest roads. Plenty of hikers just walking short sections of it.

  14. #14
    Registered User Monkeywrench's Avatar
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    I posted this in the straight-forward section hoping people could simply answer the question and spare me from all the chest beating.

    Congratulations to everyone who can hike the HMW in 7 days. I did it in six. So what? The friend in question is doing it in ten days and simply wanted some info on resupply. By the time most of us reach his age, very few of us will be hiking at all.

    To those of you who responded with helpful info, thank you!
    ~~
    Allen "Monkeywrench" Freeman
    NOBO 3-18-09 - 9-27-09
    blog.allenf.com
    [email protected]
    www.allenf.com

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    The point is, Mr. Monkey, that it's the catering to folks like your friend that has made this section "wilderness" in name only.

    Resupply and wilderness don't properly belong in the same sentence.

  16. #16
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    Don't know if these signs are still up....
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    WM, my apologies, that last post (#15) was a bit harsh. 'Specially when you mentioned your friend was of advanced age... well, heck I'm getting to where I can relate.

    Point is, my two trips through this piece of AT were like night and day, almost. The difference was the traffic at the trailheads. I was disappointed, second time through, to see casual hikers and day-hikers in the middle of the HMW. Took the wind out of my sails and messed with my attitude. There's nothing special about these hundred miles any more.

    Your friend can do what he's wanting to do -- all takes is some research, phone calls and $$. I just can't be party to it.

  18. #18
    Registered User Goonky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkeywrench View Post
    I have a friend who is planning a 10-day section hike of the HMW, and he called me asking for advice on possible resupply options. Well, it was 5 years ago, during my thru-hike, that I last hiked the Wilderness, so I'm not sure what options currently exist, if any.

    Anyone want to chime in?
    I'm not fast enough to be able to do this section without a resupply. I believe the other response regarding Shaw's and Lake House bringing you a food drop are correct. Here's information on Shaws:

    http://www.shawslodging.com/

    Here's info for Lake House:

    http://www.thelakeshorehouse.com/contact_us

    I'm willing to bet Phil Pepin would also do a food drop. Someone provided his link in other response.

    One good place to have food dropped would be Katahdin Iron Works. If you're northbound, that's after most of the climbing. The northern section of the 100 mile is much flatter. I'm slow, but I moved a little faster through there. Also Jo Mary Road is another spot. Shaws and Lakehouse know these roads well.

    I did the wilderness across two summers. The northern half one year, the southern half the next. I can't speak to what it was years ago, but I really loved it. I hope your friend has a great time.

    I would recommend hiking when there are people out there. Despite the road access, it is remote in places and if someone were to get hurt, getting out would be tough.

  19. #19
    Registered User ChinMusic's Avatar
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    If NOBO:

    Katahdin Ironworks Road is about at mile 30.
    Jo Mary Road is about about at mile 60.

    You can contact a local for arrangements at either road. I would suggest Jo Mary if you want to split up your food.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  20. #20

    Default Hundred Mile Wilderness Resupply Options

    My wife and I used Phil Pepin for resupply at Jo Mary heading SOBO and it worked out great!

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