Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-13-2014
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Age
    30
    Posts
    1

    Default CopperSpur vs. FlyCreek TENT HELP!

    Hello everyone!

    I am about to purchase a tent for the A.T. thru hike (starting next year) and have narrowed it down to these two. I have heard a ton of great reviews but I want to know more from people who have actually used these tents on the A.T. My first question is, is it worth the weight to go with a UL2? I am 5'5'', but I want to be able to fit my pack inside or in the vestibule. Second, has anyone experienced problems with the Fly Creek and rain leaking into the tent? I have heard that the rain fly does not protect the inside of the tent when the vestibule is open. I want to get under three pounds if I can, but I am willing to bump over that if necessary.

    Thank you guys so much!

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-13-2009
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,553

    Default

    I got a fly creek 1 for $100 at rei garage sale, that settled my decision.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-13-2009
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,553

    Default

    No question the copper spur would be a more comfortable tent but quite a bit heavier
    heavy day wt. vs. night comfort is the question.

  4. #4
    Wanna-be hiker trash
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    39
    Posts
    6,885
    Images
    78

    Default

    Neither.

    Got to http://www.tarptent.com/index.html or http://www.lightheartgear.com/ you will get a better tent for less money. I was lucky enough to borrow my buddy's Flycreek UL1 one for a couple of section hikes and hated nearly everything about it, it feels like a coffin and the front entry is a real pain (If I had to pick from the two tents you mentioned, the Copper Spur would win hands down for that reason alone). I went with a tarptent double rainbow, cost almost $100 less, has twice the floor space and has a lot more headroom, all for a couple of ounces more. Plus it's made in the USA.



    (I'm not trying to sound snarky, I was just really disappointed by the BA ultralight tents, especially given the retail price.)
    Last edited by Sarcasm the elf; 06-22-2014 at 22:16.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-21-2012
    Location
    Bangor, Maine
    Age
    67
    Posts
    263

    Default

    I've looked at hiking pole supported tents, but I have yet to find one that is freestanding, and that's a big priority for me. The Copper Spur looks pretty similar to the LL Beans Microlight tent. You might want to take a look at that if you want to save about $200. I use the Microlight FS 1 and like it.

  6. #6
    Wanna-be hiker trash
    Join Date
    03-05-2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    39
    Posts
    6,885
    Images
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bangorme View Post
    I've looked at hiking pole supported tents, but I have yet to find one that is freestanding, and that's a big priority for me. The Copper Spur looks pretty similar to the LL Beans Microlight tent. You might want to take a look at that if you want to save about $200. I use the Microlight FS 1 and like it.
    The Tarptent Rainbow and double rainbow can actually be setup as freestanding by using trekking poles and the single traditional tent pole that is included. I had been convinced that I needed a freestanding tent which is why I bought one in the first place.

    That said I have only used the freestanding option twice, I quickly learned that I was quite happy to have a non-freestanding tent on the A.T. Most of the campsites have plenty of spots where I can stake down the tent easily and it is easy enough to tie off to logs or rocks in the few places where I can't get stakes in the ground easily. If I had to do it again I would probably get an even lighter tent that was non-free standing (probably a tarptent contrail or a lightheart so-long).
    Last edited by Sarcasm the elf; 06-22-2014 at 22:38.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  7. #7
    Registered User evyck da fleet's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-24-2011
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Age
    49
    Posts
    516

    Default

    I hiked with a Fly Creek 1 in 2012. Yes rain will probably get into the tent if the fly is open. Keep a bandanna or pack towel handy and its not big deal. I'm six feet tall so the lack of headroom means I can't sit up in it and its not the easiest entry but is a minor inconvenience for the weight savings. I slept with all my stuff (including food and pack) inside the tent and while it was a tight fit, I didn't mind so much since I have a tendency to toss and turn during the night and this kept me in place at least somewhat.

    Yes I would have liked to have a tent with a side entry or more space(would be curios to here from anyone who went with the 2 person version) but I chose the Fly Creek because of the weight saving. At the end of the day i still had more room then sleeping in a shelter.

    On a side note BA gave me excellent customer service. I had to send the tent back to have the zipper repaired this year. I inadvertently sent the fly back first and they replaced both free of charge.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-04-2009
    Location
    Panama City Beach, FL
    Age
    66
    Posts
    1,818

    Default

    I've used almost all the solo Tarptents, and currently use the BA Fly Creek UL1. I like the UL1 better than the Tarptents to be honest, and the trail weight on all of them is close to 2 lbs. Ultimately whenever this question comes up, hikers need to decide for themselves how much extra weight they are willing to carry up and down the mountains every day, and how important the extra headroom and side entry is to you. I actually prefer the side entry feature, but the UL1 is a fantastic solo tent easy to setup and take down and I can fit my pack and food inside at night. I do not like carrying any extra weight all day up and down those hills. Some hikes I've only taken a cuben fiber tarp, and that has worked well too.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,046

    Default

    I had a Copper Spur UL1 and found it to be a very nice tent but at 6'1" I found that I was brushing up against the ends of the tent quite a bit. For someone who is 5'5", that is a non issue.

  10. #10
    Registered User Last Call's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2013
    Location
    Olive Branch, MS
    Posts
    408

    Default

    Have the Big Agnes Fly Creek 1, Copper Spur 1, and the Copper Spur 2. Personally I much prefer the BA Copper Spur 2, even with the small weight difference. I usually carry both the Fly Creek 1 (for my 9 y.o.), AND the Copper Spur 2 for myself. All 3 are great tents, but the Fly Creek is too confining for me.

  11. #11

    Default

    I started out with the Big Agnes Seedhouse SL2 because I was hiking with my son. Since I am now on my own I have switched to the BA Fly Creek UL1. I am 5'8'' and happy with it. The front entry does not bother me and I still have room for my ULA Catalyst pack, although I place it sideways now instead of flat. Besides being lighter, I also find the UL1 easier to put up and take down than the SL2.

    Elf had me scared earlier with the coffin comment, but it did not bother me after actually using it. It really does come down to personal preference.
    The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
    Richard Ewell, CSA General


  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-23-2014
    Location
    Fayetteville, NC
    Posts
    599
    Journal Entries
    4
    Images
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bbalsamo1103 View Post
    Hello everyone!

    I am about to purchase a tent for the A.T. thru hike (starting next year) and have narrowed it down to these two. I have heard a ton of great reviews but I want to know more from people who have actually used these tents on the A.T. My first question is, is it worth the weight to go with a UL2? I am 5'5'', but I want to be able to fit my pack inside or in the vestibule. Second, has anyone experienced problems with the Fly Creek and rain leaking into the tent? I have heard that the rain fly does not protect the inside of the tent when the vestibule is open. I want to get under three pounds if I can, but I am willing to bump over that if necessary.

    Thank you guys so much!
    IF you are only 5'5", why haven't you considered the Copper Spur UL1? As long as you're not trying to squeeze a dog or the spaceship Enterprise in there, that should leave you ample room for your gear under the vestibule. i have a Copper Spur solely for my solo hikes sans dog. I'm 5'10" and can sit fully upright in it.

    Suggestion- pack all your stuff, go to an REI, set both tents up and see how your gear/tent combo works out. I personally HATE the Fly Creek entryway and have heard nothing but problems about the fly.

    If you are willing to look into other tents, I would suggest going with the Tarptent like others said. For the weight savings and dimensions they are dead on.

    NOTE: reason I DIDN'T buy one was I wanted a PURE freestanding tent under 2.5 lbs and caught a great sale. i'll prolly end up buying a TT anyway, just like I'll but another unnecessary backpack. Must. Have. Gear.

  13. #13
    Registered User levibarry's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-24-2013
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    75
    Images
    11

    Default

    I have a CS UL1 and find it has plenty of room. I am 6'1" and don't touch the ends. I have the 2013 model though.
    I also bought a Tarptent DW Moment which can be free standing with the second pole option. The weight (with the second pole) is about the same but the Moment is a little less money. Also plenty of room and side entry.

    Levibarry

  14. #14
    Registered User hikernutcasey's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-20-2011
    Location
    Elkin, NC
    Age
    41
    Posts
    496
    Images
    2

    Default

    I own the Copper Spur 2 and love it. I have never used the Fly Creek but my old tent was a 1 man REI with the top entry so very comparable.

    I will NEVER regret switching from the top entry to side entry. I will never own another tent that does not have this feature. It just makes everything SO much easier.

    I have to admit the reason I went with the UL 2 was because I am now taking my young son on some overnight trips and needed the 2 man. However, I am very glad I went with this option because I am so much more comfortable when I solo as well. It's like having your own little palace on the trail. You mentioned being able to put your pack inside...this is no problem. You will have more than enough room.

  15. #15
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    64
    Posts
    4,387
    Images
    3

    Default

    I've been a die-hard Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 fan for a few years (since they came out), and never regretted buying this tent and never understood the end-entry problem folks have with it. Sure, it's slightly harder to get in and out, but since I do this usually one time each day, really not a problem at all. The end vestibule is plenty big enough to cook in during a rain storm. Used it so far about 100 nights. Nearing retirement though... maybe one or two more summers.

    Never used the FC UL1 however; I bought the 2-person fly creek because my wife is with me sometimes. If you're regularly needing room for two, I do recommend the Copper Spur UL2; my son has that one and I've slept in it and it is much better for two than the Fly Creek, and since you're sharing the extra weight, that is less important.

    The Fly Creek 2 is only a couple ounces heavier than the FC 1, I think. My FC 2 is 2# 8 ounces, measured, including UL spectra cords. I do NOT like the platinum versions of these tents; the interior mesh does not tie back and therefore seems less roomy.

    This all being said, I finally pulled the trigger on a "tarp tent" like tent, meaning a single wall non-free standing in my case, the Zpacks hexamid solo-plus, just as roomy as the Fly Creek (actually more so) and only weighs 16 ounces total. Expensive though ($390), but wow, feather light.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bangorme View Post
    I've looked at hiking pole supported tents, but I have yet to find one that is freestanding, and that's a big priority for me.
    Freestanding really isn't a big deal.

    But, since you mention it, the Fly Creek isn't freestanding.
    Awwww. Fat Mike, too?

  17. #17
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    53
    Posts
    4,610
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    Hike done a hike with a borrowed Fly Creek UL1. I didn't like it because of the way you have to get into it like a sleeping bag and the way the walls seem to collapse in on you even when staked out (because the sides need to be staked out, you could argue that it isn't totally a free-standing tent).

    I purchased a "one man tent" for myself this year during the Christmas clerance and I opted for the Copper Spur UL2. I love that I can put my wide sleeping pad in it and still have plenty of room for gear.

  18. #18

    Default

    I have the Copper Spur UL1, in hind sight, a UL2 would have been a better fit for me, and it doesn't weigh that much more. But I like the tent a lot, it's a nice set up.

  19. #19
    Hopeful Hiker QHShowoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-16-2005
    Location
    There's no place like it
    Age
    46
    Posts
    887

    Default

    I bought the Tarptent Moment DW after coveting it for months (and having owned an original Cloudburst 2). I set it up and tried to sleep in it on a 3 night camping trip and hated it. I felt like I was in a coffin -- it was such small space and if I tossed the slightest bit at night, I would wake up pressed against the sides of the tent. There wasn't enough room to fit my pack inside comfortably (and I am only 5'2"!) and despite the closed-in feeling, the all-mesh inner made me feel really exposed. When I left the vents on either end open, I worried I was going to wake up staring a critter in the face! The things I really liked about it were the side entry and that it only needed 2 stakes.

    So, I bought the Fly Creek UL2 (weighs the same as the Moment and is a little more compact) and tested it as a solo tent this past weekend. I've owned the Seedhouse SL2 (that was my first backpacking tent, believe it or not), and really liked it, and the Fly Creek didn't disappoint. It was pretty sturdy and there was enough room for me to sit up and get dressed and sort out my gear inside. My dislikes were that it really isn't free-standing: It takes about 7 stakes to take full advantage of the space (2 for the vestibule, 2 for the sides, 2 for the rear corners and 1 for the back), the front vestibule was pretty small and the front entry can be a pain. And I almost wish the inner tent was more mesh (which is the opposite of how I feel about the Moment!) -- only the top 1/3 of the inner tent is mesh and air flow isn't that great.
    you left to walk the appalachian trail
    you can feel your heart as smooth as a snail
    the mountains your darlings
    but better to love than have something to scale


    -Girlyman, "Hold It All At Bay"

  20. #20
    Registered User meat803's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-06-2013
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO
    Age
    43
    Posts
    108

    Default

    I own a CS1. Had it out about 3 times so far and it is a really great tent. I live right down the road from you. We should go hiking and I'll let you use it. Send me a tell and we can set something up.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •