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Thread: Tent Footprint

  1. #21
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Never in hundreds of trail nights, actually 1000+ trail nights, have I ever used one and never had tent-floor problems. Extra weight and cost for practically zero benefit. I suppose if I always camped in sharp-rocky areas I might partake in a polycro piece of plastic, lighter and cheap, like this:

    http://gossamergear.com/polycryo-gro...th-medium.html

    (I use this for my zpacks hexamid UL tent floor, above the bug screen, 2.5 ounces for the floor, amazingly tough but UL plastic)

  2. #22
    Garlic
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    If you look in the FAQ section of the Tarptent website (a very popular brand on the long trails), you'll see this:

    "It depends on the conditions you expect to encounter and your style of camping. The sewn-in flooring is remarkably tough and does not usually require a separate groundsheet. We just never see floors come back for repair (emphasis provided). Tyvek groundsheets are very tough and great for sleeping out or taking a break but generally heavier than you need just for floor protection. For use on very rocky ground and desert conditions where puncture wounds are possible, a light--2 mil plastic is fine--floor protector will do the job."

    I have used my Tarptent in some very rough, rocky, spiny areas on the Arizona Trail, and in the desert portions of the CDT and PCT and have never had any abrasion or punctures. 7000 trail miles and 5000 bicycle miles and my floor is flawless. When it rains, a groundsheet is just one more wet thing to deal with.

    I'm going to try to stop thinking about the condom analogy.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  3. #23
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusty bumper View Post
    Tarptent Moment. Spent well over 100 nights in it on my hike.
    Thank you.

    Wayne


    Sent from somewhere around here.
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
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  4. #24
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    Does a footprint have its merits? Yes. Necessary? Maybe not depending on how often & where you're pitching. None of my lower-end tents came w/ footprints, but they had a much heavier, durable floor. I see the manufacturers not including them for 3 reasons- cost to make, , they can charge you more ofr their custom footprint, and not everyone would want to use one.

    I have camped at a few sites where I know I could have gone without using one, and some places where I was definitely glad I had one. My decision to bring one usually correlates to how expensive the tent is and how thin the floor is.

  5. #25
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    When customers or forum members ask me directly about using one or not I always reply the same way :
    "if you can walk barefooted over the tent site you don't need one , otherwise you do".

    mind you there could be exceptions to that, after all it is about risk assessment.
    BTW, you have less chances of puncturing the floor if it is loose.

  6. #26
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    I have a tyveck footprint for my Contrail. But I also use it when I sleep in shelters to minimize puncture damage from splinters or nails to my sleeping pad.

  7. #27
    Registered User Toolshed's Avatar
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    One has to think about the personality of the user. Same as with people who buy a car. Some want floor mats on floormats others don't even care about it at all. I am a floormat on floormat kinda guy. I always use an piece of plastic under my tent. I understand that the bottom of the tent may wear out, but If the rest of the tent looks new, I want the floor to look new as well.
    .....Someday, like many others who joined WB in the early years, I may dry up and dissapear....

  8. #28
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    I do the same. Works great.

  9. #29
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
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    If it isn't bug season, and still isn't too windy, I may dispense with the tent proper and carry just rainfly and footprint instead. That's one reason I have a footprint. As someone else mentioned, it also comes in handy so that in the unlikely event I sleep in a shelter, I've got something between the sleeping pad and the splinters and mouse poo. And once in a while, I think I might wind up having to pitch on some of the nasty rock here. It's sandstone/conglomerate, with occasional inclusions of chert or jasper, which are quite abrasive. The stuff is like sandpaper. Great for holding your grip when scrambling, but hard on a tent floor.

    So, I don't always bring a footprint, but I'm generally glad I own one.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  10. #30

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    The rainfly + footprint option is kind of nice. Not just lightweight camping, but for the beach or the park on a sunny day. I used this when I had my REI Half Dome 2 in a setup similar to this:

    979029702_orig.jpg
    --

    Hike Safe.

  11. #31
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    I use one for protection and also so I don't have a wet muddy-bottomed tent if it rains or dews heavily. I figure an extra 4 oz is worth it in my case. I also carry an Alite chair on every trip so as you can tell, I am not a ULer!

  12. #32

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    I use a piece of Tyvek which is only like 3 bucks, if you want your tent to last use a ground sheet, if you don't care about your tent don't use one it's that simple.

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