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  1. #1
    Registered User hikernutcasey's Avatar
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    Default What are you wearing...

    in camp when it starts to get cold?

    I'm probably over thinking this but I thought I would see what everyone else is doing. For spring and fall trips when the night time temps start to dip but it's not really winter, what do you guys wear in camp? I usually have a lightweight top and bottom and a Montbell ultra lightweight down jacket along with gloves and beanie. The problem is I am still cold a lot of times while just sitting around before bed. I hate to add a lot of weight but I'm thinking I'm going to have to go to midweight underwear.

    Edit to add: If you went with Patogonia would you consider Cap 2 or Cap 3 midweight?
    Last edited by hikernutcasey; 08-27-2014 at 11:28.
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    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    I wear the same things, but I also have a cap 4 pullover that is all kinds of useful spring and fall. If it's too cold even for that, I wrap my sleeping bag around me. If I expect real cold, then I also have some Powerstretch tights and down booties.
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    Registered User Old Hiker's Avatar
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    I have a BDU jacket liner that works pretty well, even down to 35* or so with a short sleeve shirt under it. My long pants were all I needed.Usually, right after eating, I was in bed.

    Next time: I have a down vest and light weight thermals, if needed, for around camp. Never needed them at night, though.

    Side Trail: my Patagonia Nano Puff did NOT seem warm here in FL - went to a heavier, thicker vest. I was worried about being in much colder temps up north.

    In bed: shorts with a t-shirt if it was below 40*. Knit cap usually as well. My nose froze, though.
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    Registered User Studlintsean's Avatar
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    Early Spring and Fall: Mid Weight Top and Bottom (REI bottom, Cap 3 top), Shorts over top of the Pants, Mountain Hardware Zonal Synthetic jacket, Light Beannine, Maybe fleece gloves, Mid Weight Socks

    Winter: Heavy Weight Top and Bottom (REI bottom, Cap 4 top), Shorts over top the pants - I generally hike in shorts year round (rain pants and jacket available if necessary), Montbell Alpine Light Down Parka, Expedition Weight REI socks, Thick Beannie, Gloves with waterproof liner.

    Note: While I love hiking, I love sitting around camp and sipping whiskey with friends just as much so being comfortable in camp is important to me.

  5. #5
    Registered User hikernutcasey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Studlintsean View Post
    Note: While I love hiking, I love sitting around camp and sipping whiskey with friends just as much so being comfortable in camp is important to me.
    This is exactly why I am asking this question. My buddy and I are section hikers and I have no desire to hike until dark and rush around to cook and get ready for bed. This is a vacation for me and part of the fun is getting to where we are going to make camp early enough to enjoy some good conversation and just enjoy being outdoors. Being comfortable while doing this is important to me as well.

    Also, thanks for the Cap 3 recommendation. I was trying to decide between the Cap 2 and Cap 3 but I think for this setting the Cap 3 is what I need.
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    Registered User Studlintsean's Avatar
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    I like the CAP 3 and use it pretty heavily throughout the year either as a Top Layer or Mid Layer (I am in Northern VA and do strictly East Coast hiking)

  7. #7
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    My camp clothes list looks like this in the fall/early spring/expected cold weather:

    REI mid-weight top (pants too, depending on how cold I expect it to be)
    Rain Jacket (pants too, depending on how cold I expect it to be)
    Montbell EX Light Down Jacket
    Outdoor Research PL Base Gloves
    A balaclava (I preferred this to a beanie as I could wear it either way)

    All of this can be layered to provide whatever level of warmth I need, and are supplemented by a camp fire and/or sleeping bag if need be.

    I am planning to pick up a Black Rock Gear down hat, which may replace the balaclava all together.
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    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
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    My list for shoulder season is close to Firefighter503's.

    Midweight long johns and long-sleeve T-shirt (EMS or Champion C9)
    Thin polyester or nylon dress socks as sock liners.
    Darn Tough socks.
    Convertible hiking pants.
    Mid-weight fleece top from REI. Fleece pants from the job lot store or Salvation Army.
    Marmot down jacket - forget the model name just now.
    Mittens and glove liners
    Light balaclava and Carhartt tuque.
    Dri-Ducks rain suit, or REI hardshell, depending on how much brush and wind I expect.
    Trail runners and gaiters

    If it's 20 degrees colder than forecast, wear a sleeping bag as a cloak. What the heck, it's there and it's warm, it doesn't have to be fashionable.

    The big change in deep winter is that the rain suit is likely to be worn as a windbreak, I add a windshirt under the fleece as a vapor barrier and doubled newspaper bags between sock liners and socks for the same reason, switch from trail runners to pac boots, upgrade to heavyweight underwear, and may add goggles and facemask. And maybe wear a thicker puffy coat. The southern half of the A-T almost never gets conditions that I would call 'deep winter'.
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  9. #9

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    I will offer this: the contents of my extra clothes bag for a shoulder season trip. I hope this helps.

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  10. #10
    Registered User hikernutcasey's Avatar
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    I think my initial hypothesis was right...I just need to replace my lightweight underwear with some midweight underwear. I think if I had that along with my down jacket, convertible hiking pants, gloves and beanie I would be warm enough.

    I also carry Dri ducks so I can always put those on top of everything I've got on if it's really cold or windy. But if it's that cold I'm probably crawling into my sleeping bag at that point!
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  11. #11

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    merino wool, head to toe. (balaclava for head).
    Icebreaker.

  12. #12
    PCT, Sheltowee, Pinhoti, LT , BMT, AT, SHT, CDT 560 miles 10-K's Avatar
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    Dang...

    I was going to say you could save a lot of weight by hiking, then when you get to camp pitch your tent and get in your bag but that's not the right answer for you guys.

    However, recently in the Sierra where it would dip below freezing I'd bring my sleeping bag out of my tent and wear it like a quilt while sitting around chatting before bed. Worked pretty good.

  13. #13
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
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    Yeah, wearing the sleeping bag like a cloak works. I bring the Dri-Ducks against the possibility of combined high wind and freezing rain. You need a waterproof layer in those conditions. You'll still be wet underneath, but the wind and rain won't suck all the heat out of that moisture.

    I've never been able to de-layer to the extent that 12trysomething manages. I always seem to need the fleece pants at some point once the snow starts flying, and I sometimes need the fleece shirt for warmth when I'm hiking and the down would be way too warm (and have condensation problems). Maybe I just run colder than he does. Otherwise, our gear (dry socks and undies for sleeping, plus layering system for walking) is pretty similar. I presume he's got a waterproof layer in there somewhere. I'd sure like to be able to dispense with the fleeces - they're bulky!

    Several of the UL'ers I know dispense with the vest and have a top quilt that works as a serape, together with JRB sleeves and some sort of wind layer.
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  14. #14
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    What I bring along and/or wear depends on what I'm doing. If I'm doing day hikes from a base camp such as a drive in base camp where I'm apt to be sitting around in camp more I'd bring warmer and more clothing which translates into more bulk and wt. If I'm in long distance hiking mode(that's most of what I do) where everything is on my back my hiking modus operandi changes. I'm one of those hikers who regularly hikes 13-14 hr days virtually yr round. When I'm in camp I'm typically in my sleeping bag or quilt within 20 mins of setting up camp. That doesn't mean that I can't be in my bag enjoying conversation and the outdoors though.

    You're style is a bit different where you spend more time sitting around camp. I think you adequately answered your own original question and are right on track based on your style by what you posted here: "I think my initial hypothesis was right...I just need to replace my lightweight underwear with some midweight underwear. I think if I had that along with my down jacket, convertible hiking pants, gloves and beanie I would be warm enough.

    I also carry Dri ducks so I can always put those on top of everything I've got on if it's really cold or windy. But if it's that cold I'm probably crawling into my sleeping bag at that point!"

    Doing some minor apparel adjustments and/or adding in a few pieces like bacalava, down camp shoes/booties(w/ underfoot protection), draping a sleeping bag over your shoulders, adding mittens/gloves(they don't have to be heavy wt if you also have pockets in your outer garments), doing some exercises, drinking/eating something warm, etc are all good recommendations. I think what works right for you will be partly dependent on how active you are in camp and just what you mean when you say "enjoy the outdoors in camp."

  15. #15

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    I dont know if they are mens or womens but they fit, and are super warm
    I wear a synchilla snap sweater and
    synchilla fleece pants. They are the only ones I have ever seen, I dont know if they are mens or womens but they fit, and are super warm
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  16. #16
    Garlic
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    All good suggestions above.

    The variables not mentioned yet are your physical conditioning, are you exhausted or injured, and how well-fed and -hydrated are you? Are your clothes dirty or sweat-soaked? Paying attention to all the above will help you keep warm in camp. For instance, stopping to rest and eat before you get to camp might help a lot.
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