Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Tent Stakes

  1. #1

    Default Tent Stakes

    What's the current thinking on tent stakes these days? Light weight, good holding power along the AT. Using with a Tarptent Sublite. Need to replace my stakes after leaving them at my last campsite (bummer that!). (My little stake-bag blended in very nicely with the forest floor in the early morning!).

  2. #2
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Age
    58
    Posts
    7,894
    Images
    296

    Default

    I like the Easton nail-style tent stakes. The six inch for corner stakes, and the 9 inch for side stakes where my tent puts a lot of pressure on the stake.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  3. #3
    GA-ME 2011
    Join Date
    03-17-2007
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Age
    62
    Posts
    3,066
    Images
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    I like the Easton nail-style tent stakes. The six inch for corner stakes, and the 9 inch for side stakes where my tent puts a lot of pressure on the stake.
    That's exactly what I use on the AT.
    Out west I use MSR Ground Hog stakes in the rocky soil.
    "Chainsaw" GA-ME 2011

  4. #4
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    53
    Posts
    4,400
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    I'm currently using the MSR MiniGroundhog. They have more than enough holding power... but it is a bit of a pain having to wipe three sides of a stake off when I've pulled them back up out of the ground.
    They might not be as bad if you camp in dry conditions. But my primary camping is in GSMNP where there is high humidity, lots of rain, and therefore reasonably damp soil.

    I like the stakes that came with my Big Agnes Copper Spur tent - J Stake (https://www.bigagnes.com/Products/De...placementStake. They are similar in size and weight to the MiniGroundhog. But rather than a Y shape with 3 sides, it's V shape. Easier to clean. I just wish BA would add puller strings to the holes at the end of the stakes like the MiniGroundhogs come with (had to add the strings myself).

    There's various places where you can get Titanium shepard's hook stake (http://lawsonequipment.com/Tent-Stakes-c132/ , http://gossamergear.com/shelters/tit...nt-stakes.html)

    I'd like to hear about anyone that has tried the MSR Carbon-Core tent stakes. They look to be as lightweight (and perhaps even lighter) than some of the titanium stakes. They should have more holding power than the thinnest titanium stakes since they have more surface area. But at $7.50 a piece (available only in sets of 4) they are definitely the most expensive option.


    All things considered, I would say that I like my Big Agnes the best so far... just because they are relative cheap (@ $1.50 each), great holding power because of the V shape, and similar weight to the MiniGroundhog.

    As for weight, it looks like about 0.35oz is standard for basic aluminum stakes (simple hooks, MiniGroundhog, J Stake and similar).
    The ultra light weight (titanium and MSR Carbon-Core) are all around 0.2oz usually costing much more.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,043

    Default

    The zPacks ultralight stakes have been very impressive. http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/stakes.shtml I have used them in all sorts of soil in Colorado, the sierras and along the AT and they have held very well. And none of them have bent at all. Mine don't have the orange coating so the current ones will be harder to lose. I've yet to lose any of the eight I purchased but they can blend into the ground pretty easily. I've probably used them about 50 nights or so. There have been times when I've camped where no stakes can be used (places in the Sierra Nevada and everywhere in the Grand Canyon) and I use rocks in those places.
    HST/JMT August 2016
    TMB/Alps Sept 2015
    PCT Mile 0-857 - Apr/May 2015
    Foothills Trail Feb 2015
    Colorado Trail Aug 2014
    AT: Rockfish Gap to Boiling Springs 2014
    John Muir Trail Aug/Sept 2013

  6. #6
    PCT, Sheltowee, Pinhoti, LT , BMT, AT, SHT, CDT 560 miles 10-K's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-30-2007
    Location
    Erwin, TN
    Age
    58
    Posts
    8,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    The zPacks ultralight stakes have been very impressive. http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/stakes.shtml I have used them in all sorts of soil in Colorado, the sierras and along the AT and they have held very well. And none of them have bent at all. Mine don't have the orange coating so the current ones will be harder to lose. I've yet to lose any of the eight I purchased but they can blend into the ground pretty easily. I've probably used them about 50 nights or so. There have been times when I've camped where no stakes can be used (places in the Sierra Nevada and everywhere in the Grand Canyon) and I use rocks in those places.
    I carry 4 of the zpacks shepherd hooks and 4 of the zpacks titanium V stakes. The orange heads on the shepherd hooks really does make a difference.

  7. #7
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-13-2010
    Location
    Kingsville, Texas
    Age
    73
    Posts
    2,288

    Default

    I use some generic titanium shepard's hook.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2006
    Location
    Melbourne,Australia
    Age
    64
    Posts
    2,777

    Default

    It all depends on the soil type .
    I carry a mix of the longer Easton, some Y and some nail type stakes.
    Snow/sand type and Easton on snow.
    On rocky soil the thin ti shepherd hook types can work well.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-17-2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    60
    Posts
    4,689

    Default

    I have some Z-Packs titanium shepherd hook stakes, but I also have the UL dirtbag alternative - Aluminum gutter spikes. Less than a buck each at the hardware store. Who needs an outfitter when you have a good hardware store?

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Franco View Post
    It all depends on the soil type .
    I carry a mix of the longer Easton, some Y and some nail type stakes.
    Snow/sand type and Easton on snow.
    On rocky soil the thin ti shepherd hook types can work well.
    Ti wire stakes don't work well in loose fore duff. V or Y stakes are what I carry now.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  11. #11

    Default

    Forest duff. Problems with website or my cptr.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-06-2008
    Location
    Andrews, NC
    Age
    61
    Posts
    3,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swjohnsey View Post
    I use some generic titanium shepard's hook.
    Ditto. Works well when setting up around hi use areas with compacted soil. Sometimes I'll put rocks on the stakes to prevent pull-out.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    I like the Easton nail-style tent stakes. The six inch for corner stakes, and the 9 inch for side stakes where my tent puts a lot of pressure on the stake.
    These nail type stakes are my go-to stakes for year-round backpacking/camping. They used to come standard with all Hilleberg tents until Hilleberg made a mistake and starting supplying all their tents with V-stakes or Y-stakes. Sure, these pegs look strong but they are hell on the hands to push in and pull out and I've had them snap in half in frozen ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    The zPacks ultralight stakes have been very impressive. http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/stakes.shtml I have used them in all sorts of soil in Colorado, the sierras and along the AT and they have held very well. And none of them have bent at all. Mine don't have the orange coating so the current ones will be harder to lose. I've yet to lose any of the eight I purchased but they can blend into the ground pretty easily. I've probably used them about 50 nights or so. There have been times when I've camped where no stakes can be used (places in the Sierra Nevada and everywhere in the Grand Canyon) and I use rocks in those places.
    The big problem with shepherd hook stakes is they will twist and spin out the guyline in a tough windstorm. When camping on an open bald in a 60mph windstorm, you don't want your guylines to fail and spring lose. Nail pegs never spin but will rarely pull completely out of the ground (any stake will) if the wind is great enough, ergo you have to place rocks on top of the stakes.

  14. #14

    Default

    Titanium shepherd hooks.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,043

    Default

    I've been in some windy conditions with my Hexamid but have added rocks on top of the shepherd hooks in those situations. The Hexamid is surprisingly good in the wind but I always get jittery when wind picks up, if for no other reason than it gets difficult to sleep. I favor sheltered locations in most places but that's of course not always possible..
    HST/JMT August 2016
    TMB/Alps Sept 2015
    PCT Mile 0-857 - Apr/May 2015
    Foothills Trail Feb 2015
    Colorado Trail Aug 2014
    AT: Rockfish Gap to Boiling Springs 2014
    John Muir Trail Aug/Sept 2013

  16. #16
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-06-2013
    Location
    Chicago, Il
    Age
    41
    Posts
    3,772

    Default

    Current thinking, like all thinking contains many opinions
    I think a fair summary is this-
    Traditional types go with the Easton Nails, MSR Groundhog, or REI (or other housebrand) Y type stakes. They are heavy but do the job in any terrain.

    UL types go with Titanitum shepherd hooks- you might as well buy the uncoated, the coated ones chip easily. One tip to combat Tipi's spinning comment; overdrive them so the tip of the hook is in the ground a bit. If you sink them at an more extreme angle (good idea anyway) of about 30-45 degrees in line with the direction of pull, you will find the end of the shepherd hook buries itself quite nicely and give you the most holding power with these little pins.

    Truly UL types- pick up sticks, use rocks, guy to trees and generally get crafty. Although it's nice to carry one or two stakes, if you use a Caldera Cone Stove in wood mode you need a few anyway.

    The "best" system- if there is a consensus around, this is likely it-
    For those with Tarps or other high tension systems(like TIPI's tube, or trekking pole shelters)- size each stake to match it's purpose.
    Heavy-Any ridgeline type shelter; use something sturdy for the critical tie-outs, maybe two groundhogs. As long as your ridgeline stays taut, the load on other stakes isn't as critical.
    Medium- Mid span tie-outs, front door, vestibule, etc. Places where bomber anchor isn't needed, but some use/abuse may cause a stake to fail. Easton pin, TI pin, or 1/2" found stick.
    Light- Corners on a mid, pull outs, etc. Use Ti hooks or found sticks.

    By mixing it up to meet your needs you blend the best of all worlds in the lightest package possible. I used to only whittle tent pegs out of found sticks, but for the few grams of TI hooks I carry four of those. If a bad storm is coming I will take the time to back them up with something sturdier. Keep in mind that 80% of the time, you don't need a storm worth pitch. Often 3-6 stakes will do the job, and if the weather is building you can scrounge up enough stuff to truly guy out your shelter when the time comes. You can also rearrange your heavy/medium stakes to the windward side of the shelter, there is little force on the lee side.

    For freestanding/hybrid shelters, medium and light are likely all you need.

    The exception being terrain issue- rocky soil (up north)- pins are good, excessive loam (down south)- longer stakes like a groundhog, sand/snow- there are specialty stakes for those, though the longer groundhogs often due the job, as does the deadman technique with a found stick. Assuming you hit camp early enough, you can also set snow anchors with cordage if you allow the snow to harden prior to loading.

    Also- this works extremely well- especially out west or during dry Midwestern summers when the soil really sets up hard.
    http://www.pmags.com/quick-tip-tent-...in-hard-ground

    Another tip- to preserve your shelter and ease a little tension-
    Use a short loop of 1/8" tent pole shock cord at your tie-outs prior to attaching your guyline. This stops you from over tensioning a UL shelter, and absorbs a little wind gust/shock force found in a typical storm. Truly nasty sustained winds need solid lines, but you can easily bypass the shock cord loop in those events. The shock cord gives you a little play as well on Mids, Tarps, or freestanding tents. You should only tension them halfway- if you pull them tight, you defeat the point.

    Freebies-
    Not sure about TI shepherd hooks? Get a wire coat hanger and snip a few off to try them for free. Snip once in the bottom, and about an inch up each side for the "hook"- you get two per hanger. You can round them with a hammer and piece of pipe if you want. They won't last forever, but they are basically free.
    Sorta free- you can get Aluminum Pole Barn spikes, 40d(penny) nails, or landscape spikes at nearly any hardware store. We used these almost exclusively in our scout troop. Scouts lose stakes (usually by overdriving them)- a fifty pound box of pole barn nails will keep your troop in business without fighting about lost stakes. They are roughly the size of Easton pins, tie a small loop and hitch it to the nail and they are easier to pull back out. You can usually buy them loose, or by the pound for personal use.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-19-2011
    Location
    Abingdon, Virginia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    754
    Images
    6

    Default

    Have used Aluminum gutter nails.

  18. #18
    Registered User Hot Flash's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-06-2013
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    421

    Default

    Aluminum gutter spikes. Cheap, strong, light.
    Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day; teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime; give a man religion and he will die praying for a fish.

  19. #19

    Default

    Groundhogs all around. I hate waking up in the middle of the night to a popped stake, so I go burly with mine.

  20. #20

    Default

    Tent stakes are one of those items that are lost easily so don't go to the trouble to get the expensive one just get the cheap ones that way you want be pissed off when you do lose them.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •