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  1. #21
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    Let me toss this into the lion pit:
    It seems to rain a fair amount during traditional CT thru hike season, often daily. Suppose I am wearing waterproof shoes with rain pants during the watery times so that water does not drip down my legs into the shoe but rather onto and off, since they are WP. I know, I know...there is always some slop room for water to get in, but for the sake of argument let's say my feet stay rather dry this way. Are dry feet in the rain valuable enough to offset hot feet (well, hotter in WPs than non-WPs) in the dry times?

  2. #22
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    Good points, Dogwood.

  3. #23
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    Current non-waterproof shoes I'm digging on:
    Patagonia Drifters (feels great)
    Oboz Rimrock (haven't tried on)
    Merrell Moab (wife has a new pair, but is non-committal about their comfort...she needs to wear them more)

    The waterproof shoes I've tried on and liked:
    Oboz Firebrand II
    Keen Targhee II

    Anyone have other suggestions (still keeping in mind the original constraints)?

  4. #24

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    FWIW, I've worn my WP Merrill 2nd generations Chameleons with gaiters and shorts in a pouring down summer rain, and my feet stayed bone dry all day long. If you pull the pin on the Water Proofs go forth and fell confident, no biggie really, it won't be the last shoes you ever buy...go for it. Maybe bring one more pair of socks than you normally might two even if you don't mind the weight.

  5. #25
    Garlic
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    Fit and comfort are far more important than waterproofness on a long hike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Top Hat View Post
    Let me toss this into the lion pit:
    It seems to rain a fair amount during traditional CT thru hike season, often daily. Suppose I am wearing waterproof shoes with rain pants during the watery times so that water does not drip down my legs into the shoe but rather onto and off, since they are WP. I know, I know...there is always some slop room for water to get in, but for the sake of argument let's say my feet stay rather dry this way. Are dry feet in the rain valuable enough to offset hot feet (well, hotter in WPs than non-WPs) in the dry times?
    I have used Goretex boots and rain pants in conditions like you describe where my feet remained dryer and more comfortable than companions'. But in general, and certainly in normal Colorado Trail conditions, I personally like non-WP footwear better. For me, hot damp feet = problems.

    I've also seen those with WP shoes struggle with drying them out long after mine are dry.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Hat View Post
    Current non-waterproof shoes I'm digging on:
    Patagonia Drifters (feels great)
    Oboz Rimrock (haven't tried on)
    Merrell Moab (wife has a new pair, but is non-committal about their comfort...she needs to wear them more)

    The waterproof shoes I've tried on and liked:
    Oboz Firebrand II
    Keen Targhee II

    Anyone have other suggestions (still keeping in mind the original constraints)?
    Merrell Moabs come in a WP version, but the last time I tried them on they really hurt my feet, whereas the non-WP ones were really nice. That was quite a few years ago now so maybe they have changed. But i found it odd that what I assumed to be otherwise identical shoes were really quite different.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    Fit and comfort are far more important than waterproofness on a long hike.



    I have used Goretex boots and rain pants in conditions like you describe where my feet remained dryer and more comfortable than companions'. But in general, and certainly in normal Colorado Trail conditions, I personally like non-WP footwear better. For me, hot damp feet = problems.

    I've also seen those with WP shoes struggle with drying them out long after mine are dry.
    What Garlic said, the heat of the summer 91 degrees and my Gortex trail runners left me with these beauties, just to hot for my liking in the summer months.
    007.JPG008.JPG

  8. #28
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocketsocks View Post
    FWIW, I've worn my WP Merrill 2nd generations Chameleons with gaiters and shorts in a pouring down summer rain, and my feet stayed bone dry all day long. If you pull the pin on the Water Proofs go forth and fell confident, no biggie really, it won't be the last shoes you ever buy...go for it.
    This, exactly. Bone dry all day with goretex lined boots. Colorado's air is so dry compared to back east, foot seating seems less of a problem and my Merrell goretex low-tops (Chameleons) never make my feet sweat in Colorado, even in the summer.

    My experience, again, is that the same boot both with and without a goretex liner will dry if soaked in about the same time. I guess to be sure, I'm going to perform an experiment and see, I'll report back in a couple days.

  9. #29
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    "It seems to rain a fair amount during traditional CT thru hike season, often daily."

    - It can, yes, especially in mid July going into mid Aug, but you, as well as the other hiking Coloradans here on WB, should know that often(but not always!) means a short duration sometimes heavier rain accompanied by a fast moving front. In other words, you're mostly NOT dealing with all day heavy rain NOR excessively continuous cold temps during typical CT thru-hiking season which in my mind bodes well for wearing non WP shoes allowing them to dry between thunder storms hence what I said in the previous post. Can't say it any better than this: "But in general, and certainly in normal Colorado Trail conditions, I personally like non-WP footwear better. For me, hot damp feet = problems!"

    "Suppose I am wearing waterproof shoes with rain pants during the watery times so that water does not drip down my legs into the shoe but rather onto and off, since they are WP. I know, I know...there is always some slop room for water to get in, but for the sake of argument let's say my feet stay rather dry this way."

    - In my experience only in the shortest duration or lightest of rain does is that even a marginally effective system at remaining reasonably dry. Your experiences may differ. A better system for staying reasonably dry in moderate rain may be to wear shortie WP or highly breathable WR gaiters(like Schoeller fabric shortie gaiters) under the rain pants. But, IMHO all this is for naught if you're hiking the CT in summer(warm) when you might opt for NOT carrying rain pants.

    "Are dry feet in the rain valuable enough to offset hot feet (well, hotter in WPs than non-WPs) in the dry times?"

    If you do it right you don't have to settle for waterproofed hot dry feet to keep your feet somewhat dry in all situations. Having the options to wear WP socks or reg socks as change offs, depending on trail conditions, paired with a non WP shoe is one such way that has worked for me in really wet cold muddy conditions.

    At some pt you have to joyfully accept that getting wet for hopefully short times is part of hiking. Getting COLD and WET is something to avoid though.

  10. #30
    PCT, Sheltowee, Pinhoti, LT , BMT, AT, SHT, CDT 560 miles 10-K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post

    At some pt you have to joyfully accept that getting wet for hopefully short times is part of hiking.
    And even joyfully accept the times that they stay wet for days at a time. Hiking is an outdoor activity after all.

    My wife watched a 2 hour CDT video with me this evening at the end of it she said that it did not look like fun to her at all. I looked at her and said it's not always fun and it does suck quite a lot at times - but it is ALWAYS rewarding - and that's why I hike... The rewards.

  11. #31
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    I've also been using the keen sandels and am happy. I switch to waterproof socks when the rain comes around.
    And back to dry socks when the sun shines.

  12. #32

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    If you find yourself with nothing but wet socks, try sleeping with them on - they will be nice and dry in the morning.

  13. #33
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocketsocks View Post
    FWIW...go forth and feel confident, no biggie really, it won't be the last shoes you ever buy...go for it.
    Rocketsocks, you have hit the nail on the head with this advice. Making the wrong choice isn't the end of the world. They're only shoes, after all.

    Thanks.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocketsocks View Post
    And I tried real hard not to suggest you not use trial runners.
    Trial runners are all right if you're just trying them. The trial will be successful, or not, in which case it might be quite a trial of your patience.

    Trail runners are what I hike in until the snow comes.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Hat View Post
    Rocketsocks, you have hit the nail on the head with this advice. Making the wrong choice isn't the end of the world. They're only shoes, after all.

    Thanks.
    a big ole "you bet cha"

    honestly that same advice was given to me a few years ago, almost verbatim...and I took it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Another Kevin View Post
    Trial runners are all right if you're just trying them. The trial will be successful, or not, in which case it might be quite a trial of your patience.

    Trail runners are what I hike in until the snow comes.
    ...are you judging my spellin' it was 50/50 I'd get it right/wrong...trail and arrow, don't cha no

  16. #36
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    I have been on the AT for years with "waterproof" shoes of various types. For my fall section hike beginning next Saturday I am, for the 1st time, wearing lighter trail runners that are not waterproof. In the last 8 weeks I have worn them in wet fields, dew in the morning, they do dry really fast.

    We will see how I feel about this after my hike but I think that this will be the way that I roll from this point forward.

  17. #37
    Registered User fehchet's Avatar
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    Both ways for me. Depends on the season.

  18. #38
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    No to waterproof shoes was my choice for my 2013 thru, and I never regretted it. But that was me....have you considered trail runners? Hee Hee.....

  19. #39
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    the same boot both with and without a goretex liner will dry if soaked in about the same time. I guess to be sure, I'm going to perform an experiment and see, I'll report back in a couple days.
    I'm sure we would all love to know the results of this experiment. I hope you do it and get back to us.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10-K View Post
    And even joyfully accept the times that they stay wet for days at a time. Hiking is an outdoor activity after all...
    Says the man who just completed the rather dry overall PCT. The PCT has spoiled me in regard to favorable hiking weather.

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