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  1. #41
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    So when are you thru-hiking the PNT?

  2. #42
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    Great Divide Tr?

  3. #43

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    For me in shoulder months and summer I wear trail runners and I want them to breath. Water will get in and I want them to dry. For winter, I carry gaiters and use ankle high shoes / boots and I want them waterproof if synthetic or treated if leather. On my AT thru hike, I had to change from mesh trail runners to waterproof trail runners in Hanover, as that was my only option. I was surprised at how hot they were. Also, the waterproof membrane did not hold up very long and in no time, they leaked like a sieve.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Hat View Post
    On hikers' gear lists I'm seeing about a 50/50 mix of waterproof to non-waterproof shoes. I'm not sure which is best since both have their pros and cons. Can anybody here convince me one way or the other about which would be most appropriate for the CT? FWIW, I will be in low-cut hiking shoes, not trail runners. (If you feel the need to convince me that I should be using trail runners, let's save that for another thread. That being said, my wife and I have placed a bet on how many posts go up before somebody says I should be using trail runners .)
    When I hiked the CDT through Wyoming I walked through water in every form possible: rain, snow, ice, slush, rivers, mud, rain, swamps and marshes. Some days I would come to a river and just walk across without stopping. My feet were so wet anyway it just didn't matter. Waterproof or not made no difference.

  5. #45
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    And I finally decided to go with the non-waterproof variety, specifically Patagonia Drifters. That being said, in order to keep as dry as possible I have decided to hike the trail next year coated in a layer of sandalwood-scented wax and sealed in a giant human-sized Zip-Loc bag.
    All problems are now solved. Thanks internet!

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Hat View Post
    And I finally decided to go with the non-waterproof variety, specifically Patagonia Drifters. That being said, in order to keep as dry as possible I have decided to hike the trail next year coated in a layer of sandalwood-scented wax and sealed in a giant human-sized Zip-Loc bag.
    All problems are now solved. Thanks internet!
    You'll be absolutely fine either way, though for the CT in particular, I still recommend lightweight Gore-Tex lined shoes, simply because the CT is a fairly dry trail experience, with only occasional heavily wet conditions, which is where waterproof shoes shine, meaning you feet could theoretically be dry the entire hike. With non-waterproof shoes, you feet will get wet many mornings (and a few other times), but then dry later nicely. I personally don't have any problem with wet feet, sometimes it feels damn good, actually. On wet trails like the AT, having waterproof shoes doesn't help much, might even hurt as many others have pointed out. But this is a CT forum/thread.

    One other thing I don't see: when do you plan on starting? If in June, you will be walking through or on some old snow in places, and this is another place where waterproof shoes do well, as long as you're not postholing much, which is possible depending on conditions. Mostly I've found that with June CO hiking, you can stay on top of the snow as only the upper inch or three of snow is wet and soft, where again, waterproof shoes keep you dry.

    Basically, the waterproof (Gore-Tex lined) shoes I have used, specifically Merrells, have worked great and seem to have held up well. Not sure why others have had such bad luck with them, or I have had just unusual good luck. Years ago I owned some Zamberlan Gore-Tex boots that totally sucked, didn't really work and took forever to dry, so YMMV.

    My little "experiment", which I haven't done yet but still might, was simply this: I have two pair of otherwise virtually identical shoes, both Merrells, I hike in both, one is Goretex lined, the other not. I was going to thoroughly soak both, then wear them around all day (one on each foot, might look a bit goofy!) and see how they compare in drying out. I would weigh each shoe before (dry) and after (soaked) and weigh them at times during the day to see how much water weight went away, something like that. The other two shoes I would also soak, then sit them on the porch and see how those dry out as well (not on my feet, simulating drying them out at camp).

  7. #47

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    +1 on that. I have used both waterproof and non-waterproof and have gotten wet feet with both from hiking in heavy rain or postholing deep snow. Mostly, though, you are dealing with moisture coming from walking through wet vegetation in the mornings and Gore-Tex shines in that scenario. I have found that my socks stay cleaner much longer, especially in dry, dusty conditions when using lined shoes.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Hat View Post
    And I finally decided to go with the non-waterproof variety, specifically Patagonia Drifters. That being said, in order to keep as dry as possible I have decided to hike the trail next year coated in a layer of sandalwood-scented wax and sealed in a giant human-sized Zip-Loc bag.
    All problems are now solved. Thanks internet!
    ah man...bad move



    rotflmao.gifkiddin'....good for you dude, wear em with confidence, beeat the snot out of em, and buy another pair...dat's da game.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    I have Keen Voyagers (not waterproof). I guess they would be classified as low-top ventilated hiking shoes. On my hike last July, I hiked through a good rain storm on day 1. At one point, my shoes were completely saturated to the point they would go squish squish when I walked. The next day I got to a road crossing where a guy had all his gear laid out to dry (he had been caught in the same storm). He looked at his waterproof boots and said they have been drying in the sun for several hours and they are still soaked. I looked down at my shoes and they were completely dry. So I am a believer in the notion that ventilated non-waterproof shoes will dry and the best way to guarantee that you always have wet feet is to have waterproof shoes.
    I second this post. I wear the same Keen's when I hike because my feet sweat like crazy and I want those puppies to be able to breath. Had a similar experience hiking this past July...after walking in heavy rain half the day my shoes were soaked but the next day, I just put on my extra socks and had no problems. I also wear thick hiking socks with liners so if water gets in (say if I step in a puddle) the sock liners keep the moisture away from my skin. I've put in 100 miles on the trail so far this year in various weather conditions and no blisters or hot spots yet...thank goodness.

  10. #50

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    When I started the CT this year, I brought a hat and long sleeve hiking shirt to protect from sun exposure and an extra water bladder anticipating lots of sun and moderately dry conditions. What I experienced was rain. It rained almost every day (mornings, afternoons, night, etc.) Maybe this year was an anomaly, but the hat and extra water bladder were a waste. However, I did find that I enjoyed hiking in my long sleeve Railrider shirt more than the wool tshirt that I commonly use.

  11. #51
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    I've used both trail runners with and without gortex. Gortex works better for me. Keeps the shoe dry from wet grass and occasional puddles. Since they're shoes and not boots (and I use wicking socks) when they're soaked they dry out quickly. Boots means wet feet and blisters. Hiked the AT in 2011 using trail runners without a single blister. YMMV

  12. #52

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    Came back from seven days of backpacking in CO last week.
    Decided to try the ventilated Merrell Moab "out West" after hearing so many of the fair weather Sierra hikers crow about how they dry so much faster than waterproof shoes, though I've had no problem with the Gore-Tex version on four trips to Utah, and strongly prefer them(or Garmont Zenith Trails, also Gore-Tex) here in the South.
    Having used waterproof shoes for years in all seasons and warm, cold, dry, wet, and deep snow conditions, I thought I'd see for myself what I was missing out on.
    The first half of this trip, I'd have definitely preferred any of the waterproofs, because conditions were mostly good, and all the crossings were shallow. With the ventilated shoes, my feet got wet several times when they would have been dry with my usual GoreTex shoe/eVent Shortie gaiter combo. Then for two days, I was in and out of water from ankle to occasionally over waist deep due to flooding. In some cases the trail itself was shin deep. My feet got wet and stayed wet, and would have regardless of which shoes I was wearing.
    My midweight merino wool socks are comfortable to me wet or dry, and I honestly did not find it to be a huge issue either way, but this little test certainly did not leave me the least bit convinced that the ventilated shoes are "better". If anything, my feet were wet, or at least damp, during 7 of 7 days instead of 2-3 because of them.
    I've little doubt the ventilated shoes do dry somewhat faster than waterproofs, but that's hardly an advantage if wearing them is the only reason my feet are wet to begin with.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Top Hat View Post
    And I finally decided to go with the non-waterproof variety, specifically Patagonia Drifters. That being said, in order to keep as dry as possible I have decided to hike the trail next year coated in a layer of sandalwood-scented wax and sealed in a giant human-sized Zip-Loc bag.
    All problems are now solved. Thanks internet!
    Be careful someone doesn't try putting you on fire thinking you're an incense and PLEASE don't suffocate yourself in a bodybag sized Ziploc.

  14. #54
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    PLEASE don't suffocate yourself in a bodybag sized Ziploc.
    Good point. Airholes in the Zip-Loc would allow me to breath but would also render it no longer waterproof. I'd better bring a scuba tank with me so I can breath in the bag.
    There. Another problem solved.
    Next!

  15. #55
    Registered User Chaps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Be careful someone doesn't try putting you on fire thinking you're an incense
    I'll bring a large fire extinguisher.
    Next!

  16. #56
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    There ya go. LOL. Seems you are figuring things out just fine.

  17. #57

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    Is there really a significant difference in the drying ability of waterproof/gortex shoes and non waterproof? A few hours difference, to me, would not be significant. I have not noticed a difference myself, but have not experienced all the circumstances that could lead to there being one. Wicking action of socks (presuming they are of decent quality) seem to be the chief factor in boots or shoes drying out.

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