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  1. #1
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    Default rain/windjacket recomendation?

    i am looking for a windjacket/rain jacket that i can multi use and layer with. i am looking at this

    http://www.rei.com/product/868373/re...in-jacket-mens

    this is a new area for me.

  2. #2
    Registered User Joey C's Avatar
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    Default

    The motility looks like a great jacket, and should work well. As a thought, the Marmot Precip has been around a few years, and is notably cheaper.

  3. #3

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    That REI Motility that you link to is pretty heavy for a backpacking rain jacket -- 19 ounces. The Marmot Precip that Joey C mentions is 13 ounces, by comparison. There are others that are lighter yet, depending on what you want to spend.
    Last edited by map man; 12-26-2014 at 12:03.

  4. #4
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
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    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  5. #5
    Registered User Studlintsean's Avatar
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    I have a Marmot Precip and like it. It does well in the rain, has pit vents, is not too heavy, and is about $100. You can find them on sale at Costco online occasionally.

  6. #6
    T-Rx T-Rx's Avatar
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    Another +1 for the Marmot Precip. I really like mine.

  7. #7
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    I'm a dirtbagger. I carry a $20 suit of Dri-ducks. I replace it once it accumulates enough duct tape.

    I have an Elements wind jacket from REI, but I take that only in deep winter, or above treeline, or if I anticipate bushwhacking or heavy blowdown. It's heavy.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  8. #8
    Springer to James River Foot Bridge in long sections.
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    Another +1 for the Marmot Precip. I've done a lot of research on this subject and wanted to buy a more breathable/expensive jacket. But with everything I learn, the Precip seems to be one of the best jackets for the AT considering function and price.

    Works great as a moisture wicking wind jacket. The full zip, pit zips, and velcro cuffs also help to dispell excess heat/moisture when used in this capacity.

    The REI option you linked seems too heavy at 19 oz. My Precip is 13 oz. And the Precip is $75 at Sierra Trading Post. Find a 30% coupon and get that to around $52.50.

  9. #9

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    http://www.lightheartgear.com

    Light Heart Gear rain jacket, rain hoodie pack cover

  10. #10
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    Maybe this will help. I will be hiking in the high sierra's mostly so there is no tree line to go down to. I need something that can withstand the wind and rain both. and occasionally snow in July-September This will be used as a final layer as well as a basecamp/rain jacket/windbreaker.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Another Kevin View Post
    I carry a $20 suit of Dri-ducks. I replace it once it accumulates enough duct tape.
    I'm with Kevin, I've tried all the fancy goretex-type jackets, and nothing breaths as well as the Dri-ducks for me. A poncho might, but I always get drips in them, or have rain blow in from the side and I likewise get soaked.

    The Dri-Ducks is pretty much lighter than anything breathable out there as well if that matters to you (maybe 1 or 2 are as light, or lighter, but for like 8 times the cost). The dri-ducks do need some TLC, but are so cheap it's really not a worry. I can't stand when it's rainy and humid out and although my clothes would otherwise be dry, I sweat them wet from the inside out.

  12. #12
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Connie View Post
    http://www.lightheartgear.com

    Light Heart Gear rain jacket, rain hoodie pack cover
    what do you think of that? i saw when she put them out but heard no reviews.
    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  13. #13

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    If you want to layer with decent overall on trail durability, off the charts breathability(whew, if those stats are real world!(?)), in the the lightest wt package combo all in one truly WP breathable rain jacket/possible wind jacket check out Zpacks new Challenger. You'll have to wait to get one and there are no hand pockets but this may be a piece that can do both tasks for you so even though it's at a $90 higher price pt you may not have to buy a high end wind jacket.

    John Abela has been following this jacket through several versions in gear reviews doing a good job overall of covering it at:http://hikelighter.com/2014/10/03/zp...enger-version/

    http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/wpb_jacket.shtml

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by garyp View Post
    Maybe this will help. I will be hiking in the high sierra's mostly so there is no tree line to go down to. I need something that can withstand the wind and rain both. and occasionally snow in July-September This will be used as a final layer as well as a basecamp/rain jacket/windbreaker.
    FWIW, based on what you're saying here ie; where, when, and how, I would stay away from DriDucks in the High Sierras over treeline as well as a poncho. Just my BS opinion based on having spent some considerable time in the High Sierras from May to late Oct but you may not hike like myself. I tend to ratchet up the pace, at times, with an UL kit.

    IMHO, the Driducks doesn't offer enough breathability or durability(abrasion resistance) for those conditions but it's going to also be partly dependent on how fast you hike, if you'll be going off trail in the Sierras, how tough you are on a piece like this, budget, how often you plan on replacing a DrDucks jacket, etc. Personally, I think there are better overall choices based on what you said unless you're on a super tight budget. The poncho is too breathable meaning it's not going to optimally perform as a wind jacket(kinda important above treeline w./ greater exposure and at a time of the yr when you may still encounter some patchy snow) or for in camp warmth not to mention you may not see that much rain at that time of the yr in the High Sierras. Plus, if you do move fast at times and/or off trail a longish poncho may slow you down in the High Sierras.

    I'm hoping to test out a 2014 Zpacks Challenger CF/eVent rain jacket this yr on a High Sierras hike. The only thing I'm concerned about is abrasion as I'll likely be mostly off trail above treeline in the Sierras doing an amended Sierra High Route going from Mt Whitney to the southern SHR terminus at Crescent Meadow in Sequoia NP) via the High Sierra Tr that's been possibly added on to a high/low route.

  15. #15

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    I haven't seen a review.

    I intend to purchase the Hoodie Pack Cover.

    It covers where the packstraps join the backpack, where rainwater enters.

  16. #16

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    FWIW, you may very well not experience as much falling percipitation from rain as you assume in the High Sierras between July/early Sept but I guess you already know that since you're from Fresno and probably have been in the High Sierras already.

  17. #17

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    But, hey, people do make ponchos work. I see them optimal for high humidity where breathability is paramount, lots of rain, multi use as a minimalist shelter/and rain wear/pack cover, etc - most of which you'll not likely face or need in the High Sierras between July/early Sept.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    But, hey, people do make ponchos work. I see them optimal for high humidity where breathability is paramount, lots of rain, multi use as a minimalist shelter/and rain wear/pack cover, etc - most of which you'll not likely face or need in the High Sierras between July/early Sept.
    I love a poncho for summer thunderstorm season (short duration rain). Acts as my emergency shelter when I am shelter-hopping the AT in summer.

  19. #19
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    Dogwood,

    What do you suggest. We are now talking the same language. I think you understand what I mean vs. the AT trails.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by garyp View Post
    Maybe this will help. I will be hiking in the high sierra's mostly so there is no tree line to go down to. I need something that can withstand the wind and rain both. and occasionally snow in July-September This will be used as a final layer as well as a basecamp/rain jacket/windbreaker.
    Hello,

    The jacket you have listed will be fine for the Sierra region.

    Yes, it is heavy. Yes, it has a very low MRVT. Yes it is a bit expensive for a non-name jacket.

    But it is a three layer jacket and that will make it nice for hanging around camp and getting a bit of extra durability out of it.

    It will likely be a perfectly fine jacket for you, and a sub-200 three-layer jacket is usually a good deal.

    You will just have to learn how the jacket factors into your natural thermoregulation and you will probably be doing a lot of unzipping/zipping of the pit zips and front jackets, because it is such a heavy fabric jacket.

    Remember: it is almost impossible to buy a "bad" rain jacket. It is, also, almost impossible to buy a "perfect" rain jacket. Why? Because every jacket is going to eventually wet-out. Some just do so in a few minutes and others in a few hours. But it is eventually going to happen to every jacket out there. All the makes the difference between those that wet out in under an hour and those that will take much longer is the size of your wallet. Anything in the sub 250 are going to wet out fairly fast. Those in the 250-600 are going to take a fair bit longer. Almost every rain jacket in the 600+ range are going to take a whole lot of work to get them to wet out - unless you are just one stupid idiot hiker.

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