Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 36 of 36
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-23-2006
    Location
    Northeast Missouri
    Age
    67
    Posts
    243

    Default

    PS... The only time a mountain biker "yielded" to me was when they had gotten off their bikes to rest, for example, on step uphills. I simply walked on by. "Outta my way, biker... I'm coming through!"
    When you get to those unexpected situations in life where it’s difficult to figure something out, just ask yourself, “What would MacGyver do?”
    See ya!
    Rickles McPickles

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-16-2015
    Location
    Ankeny, Iowa
    Age
    27
    Posts
    58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McPick View Post
    Courtesy, attitude, ego... They all come into play. I had dozens of mountain bike encounters when I hiked the CT in 2010. All except one was positive, or a non-event. To me it's as simple as calling out, "on your left," which my parents taught me and my brothers to do when skiing past someone. I know the bikes are moving faster than me... I gladly step aside. My one unfortuante experience occurred when a mountain biker came up on me quickly but gave no notice. The trail was quite narrow. He blasted me verbally as he zoomed by, perhaps an inch to spare. I suggested loudly that it was inappropriate for him to speak about his mother that way... A-hem.
    Those are the kind of people you wouldn't mind seeing a mile down the trail sitting off to the side with some skinned knees and a bent frame.

    In all seriousness sounds like those encounters on the CT are few and far between. I don't mind yielding to bikers as long as they're kind enough to slow down and acknowledge they're passing by.

  3. #23

    Default

    I have only experienced "gonzo" mountain bikers.

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-01-2009
    Location
    In the shadow of Segments 22 and 23 between Lake City & Silverton.
    Posts
    100

    Default

    This summer beginning 7/26 is the CT bike race going from Durango to Denver. The # of entries is less than 100, but you could encounter this depending on where you are on the CT. I encountered many of the racers the past 2 years on the CT and they actually made for interesting conversations that broke up long hiking stretches. Don't do what I did 2 years ago by placing a tent next to the CT when the race is going on as the racers were zooming by during the middle of the night. SJ Ron

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by San Juan Ron View Post
    This summer beginning 7/26 is the CT bike race going from Durango to Denver. The # of entries is less than 100, but you could encounter this depending on where you are on the CT. I encountered many of the racers the past 2 years on the CT and they actually made for interesting conversations that broke up long hiking stretches. Don't do what I did 2 years ago by placing a tent next to the CT when the race is going on as the racers were zooming by during the middle of the night. SJ Ron
    Given the multi use trail logic, when is the horse race? I would imagine hikers will enjoy both.

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-01-2009
    Location
    In the shadow of Segments 22 and 23 between Lake City & Silverton.
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AT Traveler View Post
    Given the multi use trail logic, when is the horse race? I would imagine hikers will enjoy both.
    Speaking of horses, if you run across a couple on horses in Segment 22 this Summer, it's probably my wife & I. SJ Ron

  7. #27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AT Traveler View Post
    Given the multi use trail logic, when is the horse race? I would imagine hikers will enjoy both.
    The CT is not overrun by any user group. Last year, in it's busiest season ever, about 200 users received completion certificates. (the number of actual completers is thought to be closer to 300) There are some areas where a lot of day use occurs, but in general the total numbers that use the trail, including day hikers is minuscule in comparison to better known trails such as the AT or PCT which are becoming so heavily used that special steps such as voluntary registration (on the AT) are being implemented to give hikers a better experience.

    If you come, bring a good attitude and you will have a much better chance of having a great experience. A busy day on the CT will in all likelihood offer more tranquility and solitude than you have ever experienced on some other trails which comprise your present frame of reference. If you'd just can't stomach sharing the trail with others, then you should consider finding some other place to recreate. There are lots of other trails out there.

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-14-2013
    Location
    Nunna Yerbiz
    Age
    58
    Posts
    206

    Default

    I saw hundreds of bicyclists on the CT last summer. Many were pushing their bikes. Some had apparently never ridden in the mountains before. Nearly all were day trippers - one thru-biker told me he had to push his bike about half the time, which doesn't sound too fun. I saw bike tire tracks in one wilderness area. Nearly all the cyclists I met were polite and friendly, though few seemed to be able to read those signs showing that bikes yield to horses and hikers and that hikers yield to horses. One Triple Crowner I befriended on the hike said that hikers should not yield their right of way because bicyclists would assume they had they right of way and run roughshod over us. She would not step aside for them and made them go around her, but I would've been slammed into multiple times if I hadn't moved. If you can, try avoiding the area south of U.S. 50 on a weekend; that's where I encountered nearly 100 bicyclists.

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-13-2009
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,553

    Default

    Sounds like whoever is bigger and faster gets the right of way, horses, mountain cyclists, trail runners, big groups scouts etc, thru hikers, day hikers, in that order.

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-16-2015
    Location
    Ankeny, Iowa
    Age
    27
    Posts
    58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by squeezebox View Post
    Sounds like whoever is bigger and faster gets the right of way, horses, mountain cyclists, trail runners, big groups scouts etc, thru hikers, day hikers, in that order.
    Well at least I'll be able to tell those day-hikers to move it!

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-13-2009
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,553

    Default

    But then there is the up hill down hill question.

  12. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    It seems to vary a lot. I didn't encounter nearly as many bikes. Yes the segment south of 50 at Monarch Pass has lots of bikers. They get shuttled up and ride down to the valley below. Oh the other place that had a crazy number of bikers was Twin Lakes. But I happened to be there on the day of the Leadville 100 bike race.
    HST/JMT August 2016
    TMB/Alps Sept 2015
    PCT Mile 0-857 - Apr/May 2015
    Foothills Trail Feb 2015
    Colorado Trail Aug 2014
    AT: Rockfish Gap to Boiling Springs 2014
    John Muir Trail Aug/Sept 2013

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-27-2010
    Location
    Chicago
    Age
    35
    Posts
    178

    Default

    I honestly had great interactions with the bikers I came across. Saw a gnarly fall going down a pass, luckily he was fine. Bikers be cray.

    The most annoying thing from my perspective were the pack llamas. Ran across two different groups in one day, I was surprised. They took up the whole trail and one group refused to get out of the way from what seemed like an hour. It was probably five minutes.

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    My biggest delay on the Colorado trail was when a group of cowboys were herding a huge number of cows down into a valley. It was an experience for sure. I retreated up the side of the mountain above the trail since cows were using the trail and being driven up the trail! This was in Segment 19 believe. Check it out:

    https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v...74828733095405
    HST/JMT August 2016
    TMB/Alps Sept 2015
    PCT Mile 0-857 - Apr/May 2015
    Foothills Trail Feb 2015
    Colorado Trail Aug 2014
    AT: Rockfish Gap to Boiling Springs 2014
    John Muir Trail Aug/Sept 2013

  15. #35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AT Traveler View Post
    Of major concern are the growing instances of mountain bikers I see on the AT and access trails. There has been a big push by these bike groups to gain access to long distance trails like the AT, PCT, CT, etc. The AT fortunately is designated by Congress (back when it actually worked and did things for citizens) as a "Footpath" in its description. That will make it difficult for bikers to gain access. The PCT is a different issue and illegal riding is becoming a pretty serious issue. This group along with the ATV types around here are very vocal in their insistence if the State does not provide them a place to ride, they will ride where they want to. They erroneously cite taxes being used to pay for trails like the AT and here in CT the Connecticut Forest and Parks Association that has some 780 miles of blue blazed trails around the State, and in that "tax" they have the legal rights of use. Oy
    As a hiker as well as a mt. biker, active in my local mt. bike club, I not aware of any mt. biking club that actively supports changing federal law so as to gain access to the established long distance trials in wilderness area's or designated protected corridors and would like to see something in writing to back up this claim.

    This is certainly not the intent of the International Mountain Bicycling Association nor of any club (I've ever heard of) that is a member of this parent organizations.

    Do mt. bikers desire access to area's that potentially might be proposed wilderness or similarly protected (federal and state level) - Yes. Many of the biking groups are of the opinion that mt. biking can co-exist with other user groups in area's where trail design allows usage and might be appropriate and that there are at times, blanket policies that inappropriately forbid mt. bike usage. Thus you will read of instances where mt. bike groups will oppose such regulations.

    Remember that as a user group and being different in many ways then motorized users, mt. bikers are extraordinarily active in building and maintaining trial systems for all non-motorized groups. The club I am a member of - Concerned Long island Mt. Bikers, has constructed and maintains (with volunteers) over 200 miles of hand built trails on Long Island, of which about 10 miles existed 25 years ago. ALL these trails are open to hiking groups. This is a very common occurrence if you do a bit of research.

    Mt. bikers (excepting the occasional bad apple) are typically hikers themselves and understand the potential for conflict and for the most part, work t avoid such conflicts. Wish I could say the same of many of the folks I've met int he local hiking groups.

  16. #36
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2004
    Location
    Colorado Plateau
    Age
    45
    Posts
    11,002

    Default

    One of the most memorable trail work projects I did was on a 20 mile stretch adopted by the local mountain bike group on The Colorado Trail. Maintained by MTBikers, the day was was organized by MTBikers. They biked into the further reaches of the stretch (with tools!), equestrians packed in the heavier tools and those on foot like myself did the stretches closest to the staging area.

    Multi-use trail camaraderie at its finest.

    At the end of the day, we all drank beer, enjoyed some hot dogs and kicked back on a lovely day in the Colorado foothills after a hard day's work.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
    http://pmags.com
    Twitter: @pmagsco
    Facebook: pmagsblog

    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •