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  1. #1
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    Talking First time hammocker

    I'm planning to head out on the AT next week hiking from Springer Mountain to Hot Springs, NC. I will be bringing a double Eno hammock that a friend gave me. What else should I bring for camping? Underquilt, pad, sleeping bag, tarp, bug net? Would really appreciate it if some experienced hangers could give me tips on a setup that would be great for this April hike. I don't want to get cold/wet. Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    I'm guessing temps in the 40s. You'll need bottom insulation. Pad works, underquilt is more comfortable. If you're doing a lot of miles you won't care. Pad is also good if you end up in a shelter. If it's an inflatable, fill it about half way. You may get condensation.

    Top insulation can be a sleeping bag used like a quilt. Don't forget your hat.

    You'll want a tarp if you don't have one. Lots of options. DIY one if you're not going to buy something.




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  3. #3
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    Yeah I think you are right about the weather. Thinking an underquilt may be best for me. My goal is to spend every night in the hammock so I think I should focus on being comfortable in it. So sounds like I'll need to buy an underquilt, sleeping bag, and tarp. Can you recommend a good website(s) to shop for these? I have camped a long time ago but I have absolutely no gear and there really aren't any good stores around where I live. The best we have is Academy which I checked today and has some supplies, but I am going to have to order most things online. I saw a Youtube video of a guy that had zpacks gear. But dang the tarps ranged from $175-$315. That just seemed ridiculous. I don't mind buying something of decent quality but that's a lot of money.

    Oh... and hat?

    Have you hiked this part of the trail? Do you think bug net will be needed?

    Thanks again for the good advice.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoryW View Post
    ... What else should I bring for camping? ...
    If you've never slept in that hammock overnight, bring along your ground camping equipment. Hammocking requires a bit of fine tuning and your Double-Nest is not the most comfortable hammock available. That said, I used a ENO DN for 2 years before jumping in the deep end of the pool. If you have time to practice in your backyard for a few nights before your trip, that would be for the best.

    Good Luck

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    OC- I have taken naps in the hammock. But funny enough I am hoping to order whatever else I need for it tomorrow and practice at home until I can do the whole setup with my eyes closed. I planned to do a full night in the gear as soon as I get it. I think you're right.

    Can you recommend uq, sleeping bag, and tarp that would be good down to 30 degrees? I wanna be warm enough and dry. Thanks

  6. #6
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    You have camped before? Use whatever you have. I used a sleeping pad and mummy bag for my first 100 nights. Buy a blue construction tarp for $10 and Home Depot. Don't spend a dime until you've have at least a few nights experience.

  7. #7
    Registered User Tuxhiker's Avatar
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    Cory
    Go by or call SF Almans in Gulfport on Courthouse Rd. The owners son backpacked the AT and slept in an Eno double nest. Mr Alman can give you contact info for his son who can tell you what he used with Eno hammock.

  8. #8
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    Check out Hammock Forums -- https://hammockforums.net/forum/content.php
    They're WB's sister site and are about all things hammock.

    For underquilt or quilt sources in general, here are a few manufacturers --
    http://www.enlightenedequipment.com/
    http://www.arrowhead-equipment.com/
    http://www.undergroundquilts.com/default.html
    http://www.jacksrbetter.com/
    igne et ferrum est potentas
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuxhiker View Post
    Cory
    Go by or call SF Almans in Gulfport on Courthouse Rd. The owners son backpacked the AT and slept in an Eno double nest. Mr Alman can give you contact info for his son who can tell you what he used with Eno hammock.
    Tuxhiker,

    Thanks for that info. I will definitely take a ride over there today. So cool.

  10. #10

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    The cheapest underquilt (besides a DIY project) is the Jarbidge by Kick Ass Quilts (Arrowhead Equipment). It runs $100, and it's 3/4 length so you'll need a small piece of CCF (closed cell foam) to keep your feet warm (a cut piece of a WalMart blue foam sleeping mat would be fine - you can keep this in the bottom of your sleeping bag so it stays in place).

    If you're going to try using your regular sleeping pad for your testing, you might find you need wings added to the side of the air mattress/foam sleeping pad to keep your sides warm. This is because any insulation from your sleeping bag will get compressed underneath you, and on your sides which will offer very little insulation.

    Last, how tall are you? Even people of average to shortish height most commonly find a 9'4" long hammock like your ENO Doublenest to be way too short to get a nice, flat, diagonal lay in. Most people have moved over to 11' long models (cheapest one out there is a mere $32 from Dutch Ware Gear).

    Besides that, I completely agree with the other posts about testing your setup for several nights beforehand, and going cheap on gear at first to make sure hammocking is for you (before blowing some major cash on the higher end equipment). It's a much steeper learning curve than sleeping in a tent.

  11. #11
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    http://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/superfly/
    Great tarp. You'll love it.
    For an underquilt and top quilt, I highly recommend the Incubator and the Burrow by Hammock Gear. Excellent gear.

  12. #12

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    The OP should really find out if they like sleeping in a hammock first before spending $600+ on that gear...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoryW View Post
    I'm planning to head out on the AT next week hiking from Springer Mountain to Hot Springs, NC. I will be bringing a double Eno hammock that a friend gave me. What else should I bring for camping? Underquilt, pad, sleeping bag, tarp, bug net? Would really appreciate it if some experienced hangers could give me tips on a setup that would be great for this April hike. I don't want to get cold/wet. Thanks in advance
    What do you already own? If you have a sleeping bag and pad, use them. You definitely need a tarp as well. Not sure about a bugnet. It might be hard to get an underquilt in less than a week.

    Also, try to sleep a night or so in the hammock before then. Remember to lie at a diagonal--your head on one side of the hammock, and your feet on the other.
    Time is but the stream I go afishin' in.
    Thoreau

  14. #14
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    Hey Cory, sent the last post from my phone. Harder to go into detail. There's a lot of good advice already given here.

    First and foremost, camp out in your backyard or whatever's available first. Shakedown trips like that are important and allow you to work out the kinks. Hammock camping requires a bit of fine tuning. I've seen others ask you what gear you already have. That's a good ask.

    Like anything, you can spend a small fortune on a gear setup or piece a kit together at various price points. If money is no object, head over to hammockforums.net and you'll find a lot of high quality vendors who offer excellent gear worth the money they charge. These aren't big box vendors, but people who love outdoors and make gear for others who also love the outdoors. Again, until you spend some time in your hammock and figure out what you like/need buying a bunch of gear may be a mistake.

    Good luck. If you decide to hang when sleeping outdoors, I hope things go well for you.

    Brian

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