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Thread: Ticks???

  1. #21
    Registered User q-tip's Avatar
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    The O'TOM / TICK TWISTER® http://www.otom.com/how-to-remove-a-tick

    This is a great little product for removing.



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    Quote Originally Posted by novasquid View Post
    I bought the 10% insecticide and was wondering how to do a soak instead of spray? one instruction I came across said to dilute 3 to 1 the normal .5% found in sprays, and soak for at least 2 hours and then let air dry.
    I use the 10% permethrin, with a ratio of 1:11.5 (10% permethrin:water) to yield a 0.8% solution, which conforms with the military spec. 3:1 would yield a 2.5% solution, which is way more than you need. Still, it is likely not too dangerous unless you have a specific allergy, as the topical cream for scabies is at 5%, applied to skin.

  3. #23

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    I've already removed ticks getting on me in North Florida. I expect it will be a bad year for them on the AT too.

    The Permathrin spray treating lasts 6 weeks, then need to retreat.

  4. #24
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    I lived in Va about 1/2 mile from the AT for a long time. Yes there are heavy populations of ticks all the way up the trail to at least Conn. I have had Lyme disease like Fredt4.

    Additional advise is that ticks to my understanding are barrier creatures. That is that most of them are going to be where the forest gives way to an open space. So I was always extra cautious not to rub on vegetation (which tends to be thicker at the forest edge). That being said one day in SNP I found 8 ticks on me. Heavy rain (it is a rain year) tends to wash them onto the ground so maybe it will not be too bad of a year. Just look for them all the time.

    There is LOTS of poison ivy too so don't rub on it either.

  5. #25

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    I use permethrin and deet. Up until now I’ve just been using a pair of tweezers for the occasional inevitable tick. Both the tick key http://www.tickkey.com and the O’Tom Tick Twister http://www.otom.com sound interesting. Has anyone used both and have an opinion between the two? How much do each weigh?


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    I bought the otom twister and have been using it for about 4 years. I love it enough that i've bought additional sets of them since and given them to family and friends. Between myself, my dogs and horses it's not unusual for me to pull over 100 ticks a year and the small size otom twister is the easiest way I have found to get the smaller deerticks that I can't pull with my fingers.
    Last edited by Sarcasm the elf; 04-27-2015 at 19:41.
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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    I bought the otom twister and have been using it for about 4 years. I love it enough that i've bought additional sets of them since and given them to family and friends. Between myself, my dogs and horses it's not common for me to pull over 100 ticks a year and the small size otom twister is the easiest way I have found to get the smaller deerticks that I can't pull with my fingers.
    I do the same, I carry extra OTOM's to give to folks I meet along the trail.

  8. #28
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    I live in the heart of deer tick country. The White Footed Mouse is the principle vector for deer ticks. White Footed Mice inhabit deciduous forest with adjacent brushy fields. Accordingly, this is where you will find the highest densities of deer ticks. I rarely, if ever, come in contact with Deer Ticks in forested areas. But, very frequently I will find deer ticks after walking through brushy areas.

  9. #29
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    A dryer on hot is supposed to kill deer ticks; I think they dehydrate and die.
    If you use wash-in permethrin be careful with it. It's very toxic to fish and somewhat toxic to cats. Once the permethrin has dried it's stable and won't harm fish or cats.

  10. #30
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    Perhaps a dumb question .... what if your permethrin shirt gets rained on and you cuddle with your cat ... does it get dangerous again?

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by teefal View Post
    Perhaps a dumb question .... what if your permethrin shirt gets rained on and you cuddle with your cat ... does it get dangerous again?
    no, permethrin bonds to the clothes.

  12. #32

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    I understand the above- it bonds to clothes and it isn't supposed to come off in rain, etc. However it only last X amount of washings. It doesn't seem to add up. Putting it in water and agitating it decreases its life. It has to go somewhere. Granted, I am an imbecile and am slow on the uptake. Can someone explain what appears to be an inconsistency?

  13. #33

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    The molecule decomposes and deteriorates - not dissolves. Therefore, your cat is safe even if you are wet and cuddle with your cat . Permethrin is a very safe molecule once dry. Even wet, it's certainly not extremely toxic unless you are a cat. Light will especially deteriorate permethrin, which is why you need to store left over solution in a cool, dark place.
    JC

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by ExNihilo View Post
    I understand the above- it bonds to clothes and it isn't supposed to come off in rain, etc. However it only last X amount of washings. It doesn't seem to add up. Putting it in water and agitating it decreases its life. It has to go somewhere. Granted, I am an imbecile and am slow on the uptake. Can someone explain what appears to be an inconsistency?
    Its not a matter of washing off, it degrades. In time, permethrin breaks down into other compounds ("breakdown products"). Exposure to light and water hastens this. Permethrin is a fairly stable molecule, but in time, enough will break down to make it ineffective due to the low remaining concentration. Hence the Sawyer statement about lasting 6 washings or 6 weeks. Insect Shield uses a process that gets more molecules bound into the fibers than a surface spray can achieve, resulting in a longer effective useful life (a claimed 70 washings). In either case, dry cleaning will remove permethrin pretty much all at once. I wash my Insect Shield clothing on gentle using a sport detergent, hang it do dry, and store it in a dark closet, away from sunlight.

  15. #35
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    Just be aware and look for ticks. Whenever I have an itch I pay attention to it, rather than just scratch it. If there is an itch in tick country/climate, there is a good chance there is a tick attached. Ticks are kind of predictable as to where they are likely to attach. Applying chemicals means creating another possible problem and the deterrent ability of repellents is questionable.
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  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by ocourse View Post
    Just be aware and look for ticks. Whenever I have an itch I pay attention to it, rather than just scratch it. If there is an itch in tick country/climate, there is a good chance there is a tick attached. Ticks are kind of predictable as to where they are likely to attach. Applying chemicals means creating another possible problem and the deterrent ability of repellents is questionable.
    I'm not sure of the effectiveness of repellents like DEET, I never use them. Since I'm in ground zero for ticks and Lyme, I always wear Insect Shield long sleeve shirts and pants and sometimes a buff. I use Sawyer permethrin spray on my socks and boots. Permethrin is not a deterrent but an insecticide and has a long science-based track record of safety and effectiveness when used as directed. This is especially true given the limited exposure most hikers have when using it on clothing relative to the occupational exposure times evaluated in occupational health studies (where most of the toxicity and exposure data comes from). The very real risks of Lyme vs. the negligible risks associated with permethrin is a no brainer to me. I strongly disagree with the premise of relying on feeling a tick as the sole means of defense. It goes against the advice of every creditable tick information source and strikes me as foolhardy.

    For some good info on ticks and avoidance of tick-borne diseases, check out http://www.tickencounter.org/prevent...en_things_list from the Unversity of Rhode Island.
    Last edited by Offshore; 05-07-2015 at 20:01.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Offshore View Post
    I'm not sure of the effectiveness of repellents like DEET, I never use them. Since I'm in ground zero for ticks and Lyme, I always wear Insect Shield long sleeve shirts and pants and sometimes a buff. I use Sawyer permethrin spray on my socks and boots. Permethrin is not a deterrent but an insecticide and has a long science-based track record of safety and effectiveness when used as directed. This is especially true given the limited exposure most hikers have when using it on clothing relative to the occupational exposure times evaluated in occupational health studies (where most of the toxicity and exposure data comes from). The very real risks of Lyme vs. the negligible risks associated with permethrin is a no brainer to me. I strongly disagree with the premise of relying on feeling a tick as the sole means of defense. It goes against the advice of every creditable tick information source and strikes me as foolhardy.

    For some good info on ticks and avoidance of tick-borne diseases, check out http://www.tickencounter.org/prevent...en_things_list from the Unversity of Rhode Island.
    I have been diagnosed with and treated for Lyme disease three times over the years (After all Connecticut is ground zero for ticks ). In my experience, I am much more concerned about the harmful effects of the disease itself as well as the month long dose of Doxycycline which is used to treat it than I am with the toxicity of permethrin or DEET. Also, the side-effects of Doxycycline SUCK, so be forewarned and be careful out there.
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  18. #38
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    carry a small amount of duct tape wrapped around one of your water bottles. If you run into a nest of seed ticks ( baby Ticks) just blot the tape over your skin and they will stick to it easily if they have not embedded yet. Unfortunately it works best with baby tick but you run into them a lot in the spring and early summer. I have had 30 or 40 babies get on me at one time when I brushed up against a bush walking down the trail.

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Offshore View Post
    Its not a matter of washing off, it degrades. In time, permethrin breaks down into other compounds ("breakdown products"). Exposure to light and water hastens this. Permethrin is a fairly stable molecule, but in time, enough will break down to make it ineffective due to the low remaining concentration. Hence the Sawyer statement about lasting 6 washings or 6 weeks. Insect Shield uses a process that gets more molecules bound into the fibers than a surface spray can achieve, resulting in a longer effective useful life (a claimed 70 washings). In either case, dry cleaning will remove permethrin pretty much all at once. I wash my Insect Shield clothing on gentle using a sport detergent, hang it do dry, and store it in a dark closet, away from sunlight.
    It does degrade over time hence the statement about it lasting up to 6 weeks. But, as I understand it, the agitation (not the water or detergent) is what breaks the "bond" with the fabric, therefore the statement of lasting up to 6 washings. If I remember correctly, I got this information from the Sawyer website.
    Lonehiker

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    Quote Originally Posted by fizz3499 View Post
    carry a small amount of duct tape wrapped around one of your water bottles. If you run into a nest of seed ticks ( baby Ticks) just blot the tape over your skin and they will stick to it easily if they have not embedded yet. Unfortunately it works best with baby tick but you run into them a lot in the spring and early summer. I have had 30 or 40 babies get on me at one time when I brushed up against a bush walking down the trail.
    That sounds horrific.

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