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  1. #1

    Default What did You Eat?

    What did you pack on your CT thru-hike? I've never done a thru-hike, never more than 3 nights, so I'm not sure what you pack to eat. In my normal life, I don't eat carbs and over the past couple of days I've tried having cereal with milk and it makes me a little sick for a few hours afterword and "backed up" the next day. Next I'm going to try it without the milk to see if that's the problem? Fruit and veggies are heavy and go bad. Those prepackaged meals are gross and expensive. So do I just have to build up a tolerance for oatmeal? Your shopping list would be very appreciated.

  2. #2
    Registered User HeartFire's Avatar
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    Cook and dehydrate your own meals - the carbs and milk may be giving you trouble now, but you are not 'exercising' the way you will be on a hike. Walking 15 or more miles a day does a lot of good for that 'backed up' feeling. If milk and dairy is a problem for you- switch to a non dairy 'milk' like drink . Personally, I make all my own food - smoothies for breakfast with lots of fresh fruit and greens, lunch can be peanut butter, crackers, I some times make salads. Tuna packets work if you are not a vegetarian. Dinner is all over the place, most any meal you cook can be dehydrated.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by newToThrough View Post
    In my normal life, I don't eat carbs
    you will have a tough time on an extended hike without eating carbs. you need mucho calories. it is 90% of what you eat by necessity.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    you will have a tough time on an extended hike without eating carbs. you need mucho calories. it is 90% of what you eat by necessity.
    And by necessity, I believe Muddy means the inability to carry enough fats and proteins to adequately provide enough calories over the long haul.

  5. #5
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    No Carbs = No CT! You will be done and off the trail in less than a week. Goggle "Thru Hiking food / nutrition". There is lots of good info on the Internet. You need to look at the nutritional value of your food, calories per ounce, total calories and carbs consumed, etc.

    I try to keep carbs fairly low when I am on non thru hike working out schedule. That goes out the window on a thru hike and foods that I would never eat become my staples on a thru hike (macadamian nuts, Granola bars, snickers, oatmeal, etc.).

    You are probably going to burn 5k-6k calories per day. I shoot for 3k calories per day in my backpack and then load up with burgers & pizza & pancakes (I never eat this normally) when I drop into a town for resupply. Even with those gorge meals in town, I still manage to lose 1/2 pound per day.

    I purchased in bulk Mtn House meals ($4/meal) several years ago and they serve me well. But, everyone is different when it comes to food and many hikers dehydrate their own food.

    Ron

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by San Juan Ron View Post
    No Carbs = No CT! You will be done and off the trail in less than a week. Goggle "Thru Hiking food / nutrition". There is lots of good info on the Internet. You need to look at the nutritional value of your food, calories per ounce, total calories and carbs consumed, etc.

    I try to keep carbs fairly low when I am on non thru hike working out schedule. That goes out the window on a thru hike and foods that I would never eat become my staples on a thru hike (macadamian nuts, Granola bars, snickers, oatmeal, etc.).

    You are probably going to burn 5k-6k calories per day. I shoot for 3k calories per day in my backpack and then load up with burgers & pizza & pancakes (I never eat this normally) when I drop into a town for resupply. Even with those gorge meals in town, I still manage to lose 1/2 pound per day.

    I purchased in bulk Mtn House meals ($4/meal) several years ago and they serve me well. But, everyone is different when it comes to food and many hikers dehydrate their own food.

    Ron
    Ron,

    I'm relatively 'nutritionally savvy' and what I think it comes down to is logistics, not nutrition. Carbs are by far easier to come by, lighter in weight, and overall more accessible while on the trail. The amazing sources of protein and fats that those of us who partake in the paleo/primal lifestyles would like to bring on the trail are either extremely difficult, or monetarily infeasible to bring along.

    Nutrition has more to due with nutrients, health, and growth - what we're talking about pure, unadulterated energy (calories), which is what carbohydrates, on the trail, are absolutely phenomenal for (we can debate later whether or not we as humans should be eating them long-term, or at all).

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bemental View Post
    Ron,

    I'm relatively 'nutritionally savvy' and what I think it comes down to is logistics, not nutrition. Carbs are by far easier to come by, lighter in weight, and overall more accessible while on the trail. The amazing sources of protein and fats that those of us who partake in the paleo/primal lifestyles would like to bring on the trail are either extremely difficult, or monetarily infeasible to bring along.

    Nutrition has more to due with nutrients, health, and growth - what we're talking about pure, unadulterated energy (calories), which is what carbohydrates, on the trail, are absolutely phenomenal for (we can debate later whether or not we as humans should be eating them long-term, or at all).
    Bemental, I agree with you! When you are trying to keep you food per day at 2-2.5 pounds per day with 3,000 total calories per day, it begins to limit some of your food choices. Ron

  8. #8
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    I don't think carbs are lighter sources of energy. Fats have about twice the energy density of carbs (9 Cal/g vs 4, I think). For that reason, nuts and nut butters are good to carry. Fatty breads like tortillas and crackers (Wheat Thins for me) work well, too. Cheese packs well for days.

    I agree carbs are needed. I live with a type I diabetic athlete and it's a balancing act. If cereals don't work, try instant mashed potatoes (don't have to be cooked), breads, crackers, pasta, dried fruit.

    My typical resupply list is: the ingredients for muesli (rolled oats, walnuts, raisins), powdered milk when available, cashews and extra raisins, tortillas, peanut butter, cheese, crackers, instant mashed potatoes, Fig Newtons, hard-boiled eggs when available. I'm ovo-lacto vegetarian and don't carry a stove, so my list is pretty specific for my needs.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  9. #9

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    I carry a stove. These are my staples:

    Ramen, pad Thai, or similar dried noodles
    Instant potatoes
    Tuna packages
    Beef, turkey, or buffalo jerky
    Mexicali Rose instant refried beans (these are fantastic)
    EZ Mac
    cheese
    crackers
    Hatch chili to sprinkle on everything above
    nuts, granola bars, snickers, m&m's, Craisins trail mix
    oatmeal
    powdered eggs (the type that can be prepared with hot water without frying)
    Starbucks instant coffee

    With the the exception of the powdered eggs, everything can be found at grocery stores
    Last edited by bearcreek; 05-10-2015 at 16:11.

  10. #10

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    My food is mostly:

    candy bars
    trail mix
    tuna
    tortillas
    peanut butter
    jerky
    bacon , bacon jerky
    beef sticks
    granola/nido powder
    ghee/olive oil

    rice-a-roni instant dinners (precooked dehydrated rice )
    minute rice and soup mixes
    ramen
    couscous and soup mixes
    EZ mac and cheese

    In food drops I can include powdered eggs and freeze dried ground beef crumbles, and cheese powder to make different dinners using couscous and minute rice. These rehydrate quick and well compared to regular uncooked pasta.

  11. #11

    Default DeHydrating? huh?

    Quote Originally Posted by HeartFire View Post
    Cook and dehydrate your own meals - the carbs and milk may be giving you trouble now, but you are not 'exercising' the way you will be on a hike. Walking 15 or more miles a day does a lot of good for that 'backed up' feeling. If milk and dairy is a problem for you- switch to a non dairy 'milk' like drink . Personally, I make all my own food - smoothies for breakfast with lots of fresh fruit and greens, lunch can be peanut butter, crackers, I some times make salads. Tuna packets work if you are not a vegetarian. Dinner is all over the place, most any meal you cook can be dehydrated.
    How do you cook and dehydrate meals? And what happens when those foods run out? As I stated in my post I won't have a support crew sending me resupply (but maybe I could mail to myself before I start? Is that a good idea?) But basically, I expect to have to buy as I go.

  12. #12

    Default

    search the forum. nothing specific about a ct hike that other threads on this topic can't answer.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by San Juan Ron View Post
    No Carbs = No CT! You will be done and off the trail in less than a week. ... I still manage to lose 1/2 pound per day.
    That's good information. That's about what I'm aiming to lose, meaning that if I lose 15-20lbs I think I'll be just fine and really that's one of my goals. But obviously I want to have the calories to get through the days. I guess I'm trying to (a) carry more protein and fat and (b) get some veggies in there. Maybe I'll post a question about foraging!

  14. #14

    Default

    Except that resupply and foraging options on the CT are unique to the CT. Also, different wildlife is attracted to different food, so that might change what people carry.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hikeandbike5 View Post
    search the forum. nothing specific about a ct hike that other threads on this topic can't answer.
    Quote Originally Posted by San Juan Ron View Post
    No Carbs = No CT! You will be done and off the trail in less than a week. ... I still manage to lose 1/2 pound per day.
    That's good information. That's about what I'm aiming to lose, meaning that if I lose 15-20lbs I think I'll be just fine and really that's one of my goals. But obviously I want to have the calories to get through the days. I guess I'm trying to (a) carry more protein and fat and (b) get some veggies in there. Maybe I'll post a question about foraging!

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    My food is mostly:

    candy bars
    trail mix
    tuna
    peanut butter
    jerky
    bacon , bacon jerky
    beef sticks
    ghee/olive oil
    How do you carry this? In a bear canister? I'd be a little worried having bacon and peanut butter in my pack, especially if my pack sleeps next to me. Or am I worrying for nothing? I don't know if there are bears on the CT, but ... mountain lions, maybe? Even raccoons would ruin a good night's sleep pretty easily, no?

  17. #17

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    dont need bear cannister on the CT. Just carry in a foodbag in your pack. You can hang the foodbag if you like. Bears arent much of an issue on CT.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    dont need bear cannister on the CT. Just carry in a foodbag in your pack. You can hang the foodbag if you like. Bears arent much of an issue on CT.
    Not true. Bears have prematurely ended several hikes on the CT that I am aware of. When bears become a problem they are destroyed. Incidents have occurred throughout the trail.

    The number of Black Bears living in Colorado is estimated to be about 18,000 bears. http://www.denverpost.com/outdoors/c...nts-challenges

    Here are the statistics on bears that have died in recent years by means other than hunting statewide in Colorado.

    YEAR 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
    NON-HUNT MORTALITY 113 219 121 162 416 189 338 321 403 628 358

    During this time span covered by the chart, 126 identified problem bears were killed in The Durango area alone (wildlife district. 15), and 165 were killed by cars.

    It is so simple to not be a contributor to the issue. Secure your food by hanging it, using a cannister, or using a Ursack.
    Last edited by bearcreek; 05-10-2015 at 18:43.

  19. #19
    Registered User HeartFire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newToThrough View Post
    How do you cook and dehydrate meals? And what happens when those foods run out? As I stated in my post I won't have a support crew sending me resupply (but maybe I could mail to myself before I start? Is that a good idea?) But basically, I expect to have to buy as I go.
    Post office will hold a package for 30 days before sending it back, You could ship the food ahead of time to hostels - if you are going Denver - Durango, you would only need to worry about Silverton most likely (I don't know how fast you will hike). to make your own - buy a dehydrator, cook any meal you want and put it in (well, within reason) The book Backpacker Gourmet by Linda Frederick Yaffee has a lot of very good info on this. Some really good high protein meals consist of tuna and beans - you can blenderize a can of tuna and a can of beans, (white beans etc) season it to taste and dehydrate. I make all my meals vegan when I hike, - you can google info on it.

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HeartFire View Post
    Post office will hold a package for 30 days before sending it back, You could ship the food ahead of time to hostels - if you are going Denver - Durango, you would only need to worry about Silverton most likely (I don't know how fast you will hike). to make your own - buy a dehydrator, cook any meal you want and put it in (well, within reason) The book Backpacker Gourmet by Linda Frederick Yaffee has a lot of very good info on this. Some really good high protein meals consist of tuna and beans - you can blenderize a can of tuna and a can of beans, (white beans etc) season it to taste and dehydrate. I make all my meals vegan when I hike, - you can google info on it.
    I'll look into that, thanks!

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