Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,033

    Default Stoveless "Cooking" Book recommendation

    I have a 2 1/2 week section hike coming up this fall and I'm probably going to try out going stoveless. Dinners will be the main stumbling block for me. So far I have successfully made instant mashed potatoes and couscous using cold water but I don't have any other dinner ideas at the moment. I also don't have much time to experiment before my trip so I'm hoping to find some ready source of ideas in the form of a book. I'm doing some searches but also would like recommendations on books to purchase with recipes that have been tried and tested on long distance trips. I'm OK with ingredients that have to be sent ahead as I will be using mail drops for the trip. However, I don't think that I'm going to want to dehydrate anything myself so I want to use mostly ingredients I can buy. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-30-2009
    Location
    Woodbridge, Virginia
    Age
    60
    Posts
    2,345

    Default

    I don't know of a book (watching this thread for ideas), but another possibility is instant refried beans. Could add hot sauce, summer sausage, cheese and other goodies. What about boxed stuffing mix? Might work, add a pouch of chicken.

  3. #3

    Default

    I haven't seen any book either. Dried lentil soup mix is good. You can rehydrate for soup or a thick dal. I think some of the cup a soups or microwave in cup foods can be rehydrated cold, I haven't tried tho. Tabouli mixes are good cold. I have seen instant sweet potato in the grocery store, I can't deal with cold mashed potato but I like cold sweet potato.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    Is there a brand of dried lentil soup worth trying? I was at Whole Foods yesterday looking at some of the packaged dry soups and they all seem to require quite a bit of cooking time so I wasn't optimistic on how they would react when rehydrated cold.

    Tabouli is a good idea. I've made it cold before.

  5. #5
    Registered User Walkintom's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-16-2010
    Location
    Eagle River, WI
    Age
    47
    Posts
    697

    Default

    I'd bet that almost any freeze dried meal will rehydrate just fine with cold water and additional time.

    Also, I'd trysoup mixes. Those should work. Look for ones that have ingredients that were cooked and then deyhdrated instead of ones that have ingredients that need cooking. I'd probably dodge anything with rice or beans unless I knew those were already cooked.

  6. #6

    Default

    I've bought lentil soup mix from the bulk bins and I have dehydrated my own mix. If you start soaking your dinner during the day it should be ready to eat when you stop. Food that is powdered rehydrates fast, lentil soup takes some time.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-15-2013
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA or Tahoe or SEKI
    Age
    61
    Posts
    561

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Walkintom View Post
    I'd bet that almost any freeze dried meal will rehydrate just fine with cold water and additional time.
    I've re-hydrated Mountain House Breakfast Scramble with cold water and put it in a tortilla for dinner. I forget how long I soaked it. Probably 2-3 hours. I've also re-hydrated ChiliMac with cold water.

    I've dehydrated angel hair pasta at home and re-hydrated it and added parm cheese and olive oil and eaten it cold.
    I think that any backpacking recipe book with do-it-yourself dehydrated meals will work.
    This shredded chicken dinner looks really good.
    http://gossamergear.com/wp/backpacki...-no-cook-foods

    My sister had good luck shopping for resupply food at Cost Plus. They have salami and cheese that is shelf stable and was not refrigerated. It sat in a bear box in a parking lot for a week and was fine.

    I went stoveless for 10 days, but I mostly ate "lunches" for dinner. I usually ate peanut butter and jelly for lunch and salami or tuna for dinner.

    Best wishes. Let us know how it goes!
    Last edited by DLP; 08-11-2015 at 14:45.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-15-2013
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA or Tahoe or SEKI
    Age
    61
    Posts
    561

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    Is there a brand of dried lentil soup worth trying? I was at Whole Foods yesterday looking at some of the packaged dry soups and they all seem to require quite a bit of cooking time so I wasn't optimistic on how they would react when rehydrated cold.
    I'd look more at the "Cup of Soup" kind of lentil soups. I've taken the cup of lentil soups and put them in the blender dry and powdered them so that they rehydrate faster.
    truRoots Sprouted Green Lentils package says, "Rehydrate them without cooking for raw-food diets and an extra fresh crunch". I didn't care for the raw taste, but others apparently do.
    http://www.amazon.com/truRoots-Organ...+green+lentils

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-15-2013
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA or Tahoe or SEKI
    Age
    61
    Posts
    561

    Default

    I think that you might have more luck Google-ing blogs vs. a printed cookbook.
    http://gossamergear.com/wp/going-stoveless-dinner-jar

  10. #10

    Default

    In addition to the sandwiches already suggested one could also consider MREs and canned food including things like Chef Boyardee. Some of their products are in sealed styrofoam containers, not actual cans. Of course now you're carrying the hydrated, heavier food for each day, instead of adding water midday to one meal and carrying the next few days meals in the dehydrated and hopefully lighter state.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DLP View Post
    I think that you might have more luck Google-ing blogs vs. a printed cookbook.
    http://gossamergear.com/wp/going-stoveless-dinner-jar
    There's definitely a lot of information out there. I was just being lazy hoping for a consolidated recipe list but I should just run some more searches. thanks for all the ideas.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    Here's a promising recipe that I plan to try: http://www.trailcooking.com/fbc/pepperoni-pasta-salad/ I might sub additional freeze dried vegetables for the pepperoni. http://www.trailcooking.com/fbc/pepperoni-pasta-salad/

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,196

    Default

    I've found powdered hummus to be an excellent, healthy, tasty, no-cook meal ingredient.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,196

    Default

    Miso is another food I have read many positive reviews of for no-cook backpacking, although, I have not yet tried it myself.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    4,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    I've found powdered hummus to be an excellent, healthy, tasty, no-cook meal ingredient.
    Definitely. I can never find it anywhere in local stores but Amazon does carry a couple of brands. I used it on one trip and should do so again.

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    I can never find it anywhere in local stores . . .
    I bought mine in the bulk food section in Market of Choice, a higher-end grocery chain fairly common in Oregon at least. From that, powdered hummus may be more common in higher-end or healthfoodish shores and/or stores with a broad selection of bulk foods?

    It's just so darn simple to rehydrate on-the-spot for lunch, dinner or whatever.

    Market of Choice also had several bulk dried soups like corn chowder, lentil and split pea, all of which were surprisingly good, and would probably work no-cook quite well, although, I didn't personally try rehydrating the soups with cold water at the time.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  17. #17
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    73
    Posts
    8,284

    Default

    Why couldn't you put the dry food and water in a clear container strapped to the top of your pack and get some solar warming to assist in rehydrating and warmish food.
    We used to make tea like that in the backyard. The water got quite warm.

    Wayne

    Sent from my AT100 using Tapatalk
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  18. #18
    Registered User Country Roads's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-25-2007
    Location
    Preston County, West Virginia
    Posts
    303
    Images
    16

    Default

    I have made pasta "salad" using Ramen noodles. They are already cooked and just need to soften up & then drain it off. You can add pretty much anything to it: dried or fresh veggies, pepperoni and/or summer sausage, some kind of cheese and a packet of Italian dressing.
    Give Me Mountains & I Am Happy!

  19. #19
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO or Scottsdale AZ
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,380
    Images
    2

    Default

    It's probably not the answer you're looking for, but cookless works best for me if I stop thinking in terms of "meals." I have a bag of food I can eat anytime and that's exactly what I do. At least every two hours I eat my fill out of my bag. When I stop for the day, usually in the early to late evening, I'm seldom hungry enough to want to eat much more than a snack.

    That said, I do carry traditional breakfast foods like muesli which I will usually have in the morning (but often in the evening) and traditional dinner items like instant mashed potatoes which I seldom have before early afternoon.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  20. #20

    Default

    Along the line of what garlic said, my stoveless cooking is no cooking, no soaking. Walking down the aisles of a good grocery store there are hundreds of items that don't require any cooking at all and would hit the spot if you were hungry. Think outside the box and it's a piece of cake.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •