WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 61
  1. #41
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-25-2016
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Well, I've settled on 2 WB blackbird double layer and 2 WB ridge runners, and 4 cloudburst tarps. I plan on using pads and a 30* sleeping bag instead of quilts, because there will probably be times when sleeping on the ground is necessary. I'll test out one of each before I go, and will let my wife and daughters test each one too. If one (bridge vs regular) is overwhelmingly better than the other, I may return or sell the less desirable and stick with all four of the one we like.

    Normal temperatures in the first week of May on our section will be down into the 40s at night. I'm a little apprehensive about this, seems like others have reported being cold at this temp with a bag and pad combo. Any recommendations for pads with this setup?

    thanks!

  2. #42
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-06-2013
    Location
    Chicago, Il
    Age
    42
    Posts
    3,772

    Default

    I'd try to get a few practice runs in- there's a learning curve with Hammocks and even a good week with one will vastly improve your experience in them. It's pretty wild how much fiddling and fumbling you'll start with, and how big a difference it makes. Getting structrucal ridgelines, in my opinion, helps alot with getting a consistent setup from night to night.
    The best thing about the ground- so long as you pick a decent enough spot- you just lay down and call it a day. Hammocks take some more practice- you can't just pull em outta the box and call it a day.

    For the adults- I'd stick with large size pads. If your sons are smaller you could go with a regular pad.

    I like air pads, but foamy is much cheaper.

    Large size- I've been happy with the Neo-air as it's my go to ground pad anyway. Square,mummy, speedvalve is up to you- just make sure it's the 25" wide.
    I'd feel decent at 40* for the regular neo-air, but that is about the limit. after that you need an X-therm.
    That said if you're expecting 50"s, with a chance of 40*, you can always go to ground on the odd chilly night and be good with a Neo-Air model into the 30's.

    Klymit Static V insulated is an option too- but I didn't personally like it much. Some hammock guys swear by it though. It comes in 30" "luxe" version.
    I am testing the Exped Synmat Hyperlite Large now- it's pretty tapered but has some different insulation so may prove warmer in the air than the Neo-Air series... but we'll see.

    http://www.cascadedesigns.com/therm-...lassic/product
    You can get this foamy in a Large width- fine to 40's. Only big plus to this is you might find it locally. But good pad that will work on the ground okay.

    http://gossamergear.com/thinlight-hammock-pad.html
    Good wide pad you can trim down as needed. Should be fine to 40's as is- but at 60" you may need a small pad for your feet (doubles as sit pad around camp)
    The nice thing about this- is you can fold it in half and have a 1/2" thick 19" wide ground pad but still get full coverage in the hammock.

    Something like this- http://gossamergear.com/sitlight-sit-pad-group.html

    On the cheapie side- you can do the PLUQ or the truckstop windshield (reflectix) pads- but those are crap on the ground and bulky.

  3. #43
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-25-2016
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Thanks Bill! Great info. I'm liking the NeoAir Trekker in large size at the moment. Fairly light, supposedly very comfortable if you have to go to ground. 1lb 7oz, 25"x77". Maybe noisy though, from the reviews. It's $150, though, ouch. My sons are bigger than me, over 6'.

  4. #44
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-25-2016
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Update: My 2 sons and I did the section hike from Fontana Dam to NOC the first week of May. We had Warbonnet hammocks (2 bridge, 1 end gathered). We had Jacks top quilts, but instead of an under quilt we opted for Thermarest Trekker air mattresses in the hammocks (which have a 'pocket' for air mattresses). I was worried that we might have to go to ground, hence the air mattresses. Our last night it was cold and rainy, actually turned to snow in the morning, so was in the 30s. It was impossible to keep on top of the air mattress in either style of hammock, so we got cold on whatever body part of us slipped off the mattress. It's a hard decision to replace the air mattress with an under quilt, but the air mattress/hammock combo was definitely not ideal. The hammocks are definitely more comfortable than sleeping on the ground even with the best lightweight air mattress. It's a tough call!

  5. #45
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-26-2015
    Location
    St Louis, MO
    Age
    46
    Posts
    39

    Default

    In high humidity 30s and below as described a combination of pads, quilts and warm clothes is best. Throw in a hammock sock or very well situated tarp and windbreak for good measure. It's no fun to find out your quilts are below their comfort rating, and have your core be cold. 1+ on the GG thinlight pad plus quilts for that.

    Hammocking in those conditions is nothing like crawling into a 20 degree bag. The hammock is always going to be much colder.

    Quote Originally Posted by FossilFool View Post
    Update: My 2 sons and I did the section hike from Fontana Dam to NOC the first week of May. We had Warbonnet hammocks (2 bridge, 1 end gathered). We had Jacks top quilts, but instead of an under quilt we opted for Thermarest Trekker air mattresses in the hammocks (which have a 'pocket' for air mattresses). I was worried that we might have to go to ground, hence the air mattresses. Our last night it was cold and rainy, actually turned to snow in the morning, so was in the 30s. It was impossible to keep on top of the air mattress in either style of hammock, so we got cold on whatever body part of us slipped off the mattress. It's a hard decision to replace the air mattress with an under quilt, but the air mattress/hammock combo was definitely not ideal. The hammocks are definitely more comfortable than sleeping on the ground even with the best lightweight air mattress. It's a tough call!

  6. #46
    Registered User RabbitHole's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-11-2014
    Location
    Arlington VA
    Age
    32
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    I have limited hammock experience but from that I found a mat inside a hammock doesn't work very well. It's just not the right shape. You also need a side entry hammock, a bottom entry like some of the Hennesys are impossible.

    I'm not sure how effective an air mattress like a neo-air would be in a hammock. I have a feeling it wouldn't be too good. A closed cell foam would be better and you could shape the top and bottom edges to better conform to the shape of the hammock.
    Pads work fine for warmth but not comfort. Keep the pad way under inflated so it takes a less rigid shape. I'm struggling with the same issue. 30 degree bag and neo air sleep well down to about 25. But it's a rough night in terms of comfort.

  7. #47

    Default

    When I'm in a gathered end hammock I prefer an UQ. When I'm in my Ridgerunner bridge type hammock I actually have come to prefer my closed cell foam pad as I don't have to worry about keeping it dry and it is multi use. It makes a great sit pad, yoga mat and works in a pinch if I want or need to go to the ground. Being closed cell I don't have to worry about leaks. Pads don't move around or distort in bridge type hammocks.

  8. #48
    Registered User Theosus's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-22-2011
    Location
    Florence, South Carolina, United States
    Age
    49
    Posts
    711
    Images
    1

    Default

    I tried a pad and hated it in the Hennessy. Sweaty back and frozen sides. I like the wrap around effect of the quilt MUCH better. Warm and snug all around.
    Please don't read my blog at theosus1.Wordpress.com
    "I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference. Thank God for Search and Rescue" - Robert Frost (first edit).

  9. #49
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-25-2015
    Location
    Sugar Hill, GA
    Age
    55
    Posts
    920

    Default

    IMO, a pad is a step to an UQ. Will it keep you warmer than nothing? Yes. But everything I've read says it won't compare to an UQ.

  10. #50
    Registered User allmebloominlife's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-20-2015
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Age
    51
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Cadenza...

    I think it has a lot to do with WHICH HAMMOCK.

    In my Clarks a pad works just fine.
    In the Warbonnet Blackbird (which I hate anyway) a pad is a disaster.
    In the Dream Hammock Thunderbird (double layer) a pad is OK but it's easy to get partially off the pad.

    In all cases, an UQ is warmer. But in mild weather the Clarks with a pad is not a bad way to go. The 3/4 length Thermarest inflatable is simple and quick.

    I'm considering the WBBB....you said the pad is a disaster. Is that because the extra layer doesn't conform to the asymmetrical cut? Does is follow the natural banana shape?

  11. #51
    In the shadows AfterParty's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-11-2016
    Location
    Norton, Kansas
    Age
    40
    Posts
    490
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    12

    Default

    I don't mind pads and ordered a revolt 75 that should be getting close!!! I have rigged my rev up and it kinda worked. Sides were floppy obviously. But it made me more comfortable. I also just rigged up a hang on my closed in porch. Has windows on 3 walls. Can't wait to try out the UQ. A women's xlite will stay on a good angle in my explorer which is 11 I believe. I just fill it about half way up. And sleep fine. But I can sleep in the cold.

  12. #52
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-06-2013
    Location
    Chicago, Il
    Age
    42
    Posts
    3,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jpolk84 View Post
    IMO, a pad is a step to an UQ. Will it keep you warmer than nothing? Yes. But everything I've read says it won't compare to an UQ.
    On comfort basically... there are some very experienced deep winter folks that have chimed in before that rely on foam.

    Basically- a decent enough pile of crumpled up newspaper compares quite favorably to down. You probably just wouldn't pack them.

    By far, an UQ is more comfortable in most any hammock.
    But warmer has nothing to do with it really.

    And on a trail like the AT, where you may want to stay in a shelter, at a hostel, on top of Max Patch, above treeline up north, or simply cowboy camp in an open meadow... it's very difficult to so with an UQ

    That said-
    A neoair is only good to about 45 or so in a hammock. An Xtherm is only good to about freezing. The convection losses are too great for pads working mainly on air.
    Foam is unaffected, but does have a hard time conforming to you to the point it may not work. However a Segmented Pad Extender (SPE) solves that.
    However an insulated pad like an Exped or Down Mat performs similar in a hammock to how it would on the ground.

    So these seem to be the ideal pads for those interested in a more balanced kit that is capable of sleeping wherever they choose.

    Personally I like a bridge (easy piesy), or the shortest gathered end you find comfy for pad use so that it doesn't have as much room to skitter away on you.

    I'm a fan of the Exped Synmat hyperlite MW- it has a Primaloft like insulation and falls between the NeoAir and Xtherm in specs (15 oz or so with the bag and good to 35 or so)

    The other thing to realize- is if it is really cold and you have a pad- going to ground will let you take that pad into colder temps than in the air. As in... say you shot for 35 with your gear but a bad night rolls though at 25*. Just go to ground and you'll get the full value of the sleeping pad once the excessive convective loss is gone.

  13. #53
    In the shadows AfterParty's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-11-2016
    Location
    Norton, Kansas
    Age
    40
    Posts
    490
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    12

    Default

    That's good advise for this rookie. I figure if it is too cold with a 40 UQ and a 30 TQ I can throw my xlite on the ground and double my quilts. I have also heard great things about EE temp ratings. So I might have a few cold nights but I'm planning a mid April start and temps should not be below 45 many nights according to the internet in GA.

  14. #54
    Registered User stilllife's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-28-2011
    Location
    Madison,MS
    Age
    59
    Posts
    228

    Default

    gbolt, I'm curious what you mean by "except for the smokies".

  15. #55
    In the shadows AfterParty's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-11-2016
    Location
    Norton, Kansas
    Age
    40
    Posts
    490
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    12

    Default

    You have to stay in shelters in the smokies until full then you if thru hiking can set up in close proximity to the shelter. So you need a pad in the smokies making it not obsolete.

  16. #56
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-02-2017
    Location
    Woodstock, GA
    Age
    48
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I use a clark UQ but take a bed roll sized piece of reflection with me, It weighs very little and it's cheap. Works great if the wind is blowing to give me a little extra wind protection if needed. Slept in heavy winds with actual temps in the low teens. my bag is a 15 degree bag. but with the UQ and reflectix I was toasty. Also on a night that was blowing wind and sleeting rain with temps in the 20's I was able to set my hammock a little higher and draw my tarp down. Then I was able to sit under my set up and use my reflection as a wind break while I cooked supper. I curved the reflectix around me and ate comfortably. while cooking the heat from my stove actually heating the space up around me inside the reflectix wind break and the UQ above me. Felt like the temp was about 10 degrees warmer than the blowing air on the other side of the wind break. I will never winter hike without my UQ and my cheap sheet of reflectix.

  17. #57
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-14-2014
    Location
    Eastover, NC
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I have a 20 year old bottom entry Hennessy and a 3/4 thermarest Neo Air that I have used for a cumulative two months time while attempting a thru hike in 2014. I went with the shorter air mattress and a thermarest sleeping bag designed to be used together (sleeping bag has elastic material on the underside of the bag to secure the air mattress to the bag). The bag/air mattress combo takes awhile to get right and it takes practice to sleep on ones side or move around without the mattress slipping.

    I like the versatility of being able to use the air mattress in shelters when I'm feeling too lazy or too beat to set up my hammock.

    I minimize the cbs by also carrying a hand made poncho liner that I use to stuff around the cold spots...my poncho liner is made of wind proof outer shell and space age insulation that provides warmth when wet...helped on those early days when I didn't get my hammock tarp set up quite right on rainy nights.

    I recently bought a regular/full size thermarest neo air for those nights in a shelter...3/4 is cool (I'm 5'7") but I have difficulty getting comfortable with my feet and lower legs dangling off the mattress...haven't tried it yet with the hammock...

  18. #58
    Registered User ggreaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-13-2013
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Age
    54
    Posts
    190

    Default

    The Klymit Insulated Static V-Lite (slightly underinflated) is the perfect mattress for a hammock. I've used one (the older Klymit Insulated Static V) for 4 years now. Because of the baffle shape it conforms to the hammock quite well. You won't have cold shoulders with it (23" wide). I have underquilts and I alternate quite regularly between the Klymit and UQ's. I don't even bother putting it between the hammock layers as well. Steer clear of the Neoairs for hammocks. It's a great ground pad but the horizontal baffles don't work well in a hammock. The ridgeline is in your face and the hammock becomes tippy. The 20" wide ones won't keep your shoulders warm and the 25" wide ones are too wide for a hammock.

  19. #59
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-14-2017
    Location
    Pasadena, Maryland
    Age
    49
    Posts
    486

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ggreaves View Post
    The Klymit Insulated Static V-Lite (slightly underinflated) is the perfect mattress for a hammock. I've used one (the older Klymit Insulated Static V) for 4 years now. Because of the baffle shape it conforms to the hammock quite well. You won't have cold shoulders with it (23" wide). I have underquilts and I alternate quite regularly between the Klymit and UQ's. I don't even bother putting it between the hammock layers as well. Steer clear of the Neoairs for hammocks. It's a great ground pad but the horizontal baffles don't work well in a hammock. The ridgeline is in your face and the hammock becomes tippy. The 20" wide ones won't keep your shoulders warm and the 25" wide ones are too wide for a hammock.
    I was actually looking at this and the new insulated Hammock V. I was worried the Hammock version would be too wide when I have to tent camp with my kids. Thanks for the input on the regular Insulated V, you probably just swayed my decision.

  20. #60

    Default

    I've too tried the Klymit Insulated Static V-Lite and found it to be probably the best mattress for hammock use. However it still is not the ideal design and moves around a bit if you toss and turn in the night. This can incredibly annoying at 2AM. For underquilts, I think that I find them more warm overall.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •