Page 20 of 20 FirstFirst ... 10 16 17 18 19 20
Results 381 to 387 of 387
  1. #381
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    16,049

    Default

    Those tea lists others provided are really great offering new ideas to me. I'm impressed with all that was offered by others. I like to learn what others are doing. Now, we're sharing not talking at or down to each other. That's so appreciated.

    Like my snobbish coffees but maybe I need to turn a new leaf.

  2. #382
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-20-2017
    Location
    Saint Johns, FL
    Age
    51
    Posts
    502

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Don't believe the USA hardiness maps for Ilex vomitoria - yaupon. It can be grown in Zone 7 especially cultivars. I used to incorporate Ilex vomitoria "Schillings", also know under the alternative name "Stokes Dwarf", a Monrovia introduction, mainly in commercial designs in eastern PA and much of NJ.

    There's a strikingly beautiful weeping form of I. vomitoria cultivar, especially when dripping in small dark red abundant fruit, but less hardy than "Stokes", when allowed to exist without being massacred into a tightly sheared formal monstrosity, called Pendula. I use it as an accent in its natural form unsheared in fte form naturalized xeriscape designs in the south.

    I wasn't gung ho on yaupon tea unless it had much honey in it. I can say that about most foraged teas unless adding some leaves with sweetness, flowers, or fruit.
    I have those ilex schillings in my landscape. Didn't recognize that it's related to yaupon holly, but now that you mention it I see the similarity.... Do you know for sure if these other varieties have the same properties regarding making the "black drink"? are they edible just the same?

  3. #383
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    16,049

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blw2 View Post
    I have those ilex schillings in my landscape. Didn't recognize that it's related to yaupon holly, but now that you mention it I see the similarity.... Do you know for sure if these other varieties have the same properties regarding making the "black drink"? are they edible just the same?
    They probably can be made into a tea too but I don't know as the only yaupon tea I've had was in FL and GA and it was the straight species Ilex vomitoria from new growth tips of female trees. The best tea leaves are often young tender leaves just as Camellia sinensis what most know as tea Asian tea.

    Did you know yaupon has caffeine and that it is in the same Ilex - holly' genus as yerba mate which comes from S. America, I. paraguariensis?

    I do prefer yaupon tea over yerba mate but have not extensively sampled either. YM is too bitter for me.

    A lot of info can be gleaned by knowing the origins of botanical nomenclature. It can be easier than might be assumed. For example, vomitoria I think came from Native Americans drinking too much yaupon tea inducing vomiting. Paraguariensis refers to the general region where yerba mate is grown - Paraguay

    http://www.walterreeves.com/landscap...a-from-leaves/

  4. #384
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    16,049

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Deacon View Post
    Ever since I was little, I’ve made tea from the root of Queen Anne’s Lace, one of the most common plants in the east. It has a taste reminiscent of carrots and licorice.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I've eaten it raw. You nailed the taste.

    For some brain fog reason I still will not eat it unless I have a pic or description in front of me because I'm concerned about unintentionlly going as Socrates. I still can't 100% distinguish it from poison hemlock.

  5. #385
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-13-2015
    Location
    Orangeville, Ontario, Canada
    Age
    67
    Posts
    325

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    I've eaten it raw. You nailed the taste.

    For some brain fog reason I still will not eat it unless I have a pic or description in front of me because I'm concerned about unintentionlly going as Socrates. I still can't 100% distinguish it from poison hemlock.
    Queen Anne’s Lace _is_ wild carrot, an introduced weedy variation accidentally brought over from Europe by immigrants. Up here in Canada, it is very common and grows in disturbed, mostly dry and open habitats. Mostly tough and fibrous thin roots, seldom as big as a short thin pencil, and often not much thicker than a pencil lead. The seeds were reportedly used as a cheap pepper-like seasoning. I’d never consider them a ‘first-line’ food, as gathering them, even when in profusion, requires a lot of labour. Nice taste to chew on raw, but not much else.

    The various poisonous hemlocks here (and elsewhere, I believe) are wetland plants, and are not very common unless your feet are muddy and wet. A wetland plant looking carrot-like is worth NOT even touching, as the worst can transmit small amounts of poison through the skin …

  6. #386
    Registered User theinfamousj's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-23-2007
    Location
    UNC-CH, NC
    Posts
    677
    Images
    60

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Traillium View Post
    Actually, what non-caffeinated teas/tisanes/drinks do folks make along the trail from gathered material?
    I make pine needle tea. Don't drink this if you want to keep your pregnancy. Do drink it if you don't. So much vitamin c. Causes a chemical abortio-- miscarriage.

    Sent from my SGH-I337 using Tapatalk

  7. #387

    Default

    I am a starbucks Via user... Its pretty good and barely takes up any room packed. I keep a few pouches in my stove kit at all times.

Page 20 of 20 FirstFirst ... 10 16 17 18 19 20
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •