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  1. #381
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    Those tea lists others provided are really great offering new ideas to me. I'm impressed with all that was offered by others. I like to learn what others are doing. Now, we're sharing not talking at or down to each other. That's so appreciated.

    Like my snobbish coffees but maybe I need to turn a new leaf.

  2. #382

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Don't believe the USA hardiness maps for Ilex vomitoria - yaupon. It can be grown in Zone 7 especially cultivars. I used to incorporate Ilex vomitoria "Schillings", also know under the alternative name "Stokes Dwarf", a Monrovia introduction, mainly in commercial designs in eastern PA and much of NJ.

    There's a strikingly beautiful weeping form of I. vomitoria cultivar, especially when dripping in small dark red abundant fruit, but less hardy than "Stokes", when allowed to exist without being massacred into a tightly sheared formal monstrosity, called Pendula. I use it as an accent in its natural form unsheared in fte form naturalized xeriscape designs in the south.

    I wasn't gung ho on yaupon tea unless it had much honey in it. I can say that about most foraged teas unless adding some leaves with sweetness, flowers, or fruit.
    I have those ilex schillings in my landscape. Didn't recognize that it's related to yaupon holly, but now that you mention it I see the similarity.... Do you know for sure if these other varieties have the same properties regarding making the "black drink"? are they edible just the same?

  3. #383
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    Quote Originally Posted by blw2 View Post
    I have those ilex schillings in my landscape. Didn't recognize that it's related to yaupon holly, but now that you mention it I see the similarity.... Do you know for sure if these other varieties have the same properties regarding making the "black drink"? are they edible just the same?
    They probably can be made into a tea too but I don't know as the only yaupon tea I've had was in FL and GA and it was the straight species Ilex vomitoria from new growth tips of female trees. The best tea leaves are often young tender leaves just as Camellia sinensis what most know as tea Asian tea.

    Did you know yaupon has caffeine and that it is in the same Ilex - holly' genus as yerba mate which comes from S. America, I. paraguariensis?

    I do prefer yaupon tea over yerba mate but have not extensively sampled either. YM is too bitter for me.

    A lot of info can be gleaned by knowing the origins of botanical nomenclature. It can be easier than might be assumed. For example, vomitoria I think came from Native Americans drinking too much yaupon tea inducing vomiting. Paraguariensis refers to the general region where yerba mate is grown - Paraguay

    http://www.walterreeves.com/landscap...a-from-leaves/

  4. #384
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deacon View Post
    Ever since I was little, I’ve made tea from the root of Queen Anne’s Lace, one of the most common plants in the east. It has a taste reminiscent of carrots and licorice.


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    I've eaten it raw. You nailed the taste.

    For some brain fog reason I still will not eat it unless I have a pic or description in front of me because I'm concerned about unintentionlly going as Socrates. I still can't 100% distinguish it from poison hemlock.

  5. #385
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    I've eaten it raw. You nailed the taste.

    For some brain fog reason I still will not eat it unless I have a pic or description in front of me because I'm concerned about unintentionlly going as Socrates. I still can't 100% distinguish it from poison hemlock.
    Queen Anne’s Lace _is_ wild carrot, an introduced weedy variation accidentally brought over from Europe by immigrants. Up here in Canada, it is very common and grows in disturbed, mostly dry and open habitats. Mostly tough and fibrous thin roots, seldom as big as a short thin pencil, and often not much thicker than a pencil lead. The seeds were reportedly used as a cheap pepper-like seasoning. I’d never consider them a ‘first-line’ food, as gathering them, even when in profusion, requires a lot of labour. Nice taste to chew on raw, but not much else.

    The various poisonous hemlocks here (and elsewhere, I believe) are wetland plants, and are not very common unless your feet are muddy and wet. A wetland plant looking carrot-like is worth NOT even touching, as the worst can transmit small amounts of poison through the skin …

  6. #386
    Registered User theinfamousj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traillium View Post
    Actually, what non-caffeinated teas/tisanes/drinks do folks make along the trail from gathered material?
    I make pine needle tea. Don't drink this if you want to keep your pregnancy. Do drink it if you don't. So much vitamin c. Causes a chemical abortio-- miscarriage.

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  7. #387

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    I am a starbucks Via user... Its pretty good and barely takes up any room packed. I keep a few pouches in my stove kit at all times.

  8. #388

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    Medaglia D'Oro instant Espresso coffee. About $5 for a 2 ounce jar. Way cheaper than starbucks via and just as good unless you're super particular about your coffee.

  9. #389
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    For tea, I'm partial to Jasmine Green tea. I have a tin of Twining loose leaf now. For "generic" affordable black tea bags, I like Red Rose. A good Canadian brand widely available.

  10. #390
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    Though I am a coffee snob, Starbucks instant tastes damned good after a night of sleeping outside.

  11. #391

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    Just read this entire thread, "coffee on the trail...". Fascinating lessons/opinions on LNT, cat poop, and tea! While lots of Bustello references, I don't think anyone mentioned this:

    CB_3in1_ConLeche_400.jpg
    Advertised as 'cafe con leche'. When I need convenience vs quality, I settle for this. Each box has 5 tubes, costs $2.39 at my Publix. Just my 2 cents.....

  12. #392

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    We used to try a lot of the fancy specialty coffees until we ran out. My wife went to the local store and all they had was Folgers dark roast. DANG, it is better than any of the designer coffees. On the trail I take some paper filters and enough Folgers for the trip. The filter works great!

    https://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-...+coffee+filter

  13. #393
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchee View Post
    We used to try a lot of the fancy specialty coffees until we ran out. My wife went to the local store and all they had was Folgers dark roast. DANG, it is better than any of the designer coffees. On the trail I take some paper filters and enough Folgers for the trip. The filter works great!

    https://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-...+coffee+filter
    Exactly the system I use, except that I grind whatever's on sale at Trader Joe's and bring that.

    The GSI isn't supposed to need paper filters, but without them it drips too fast and brews weak.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  14. #394

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    A paper filter would also make cleanup a bit easier. Just fold it up and drop it in a trash bag to pack out, no rinsing of the GSI unit needed. I might have to try that the next time I think about carrying a stove again.

  15. #395
    Registered User MtDoraDave's Avatar
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    For the coffee snobs who refuse to use instant coffee, I tried my little espresso maker with my fancee feest ... I understand that you are supposed to use medium heat, but I can't tell the difference when I use the stove on medium heat and the fancee feest - except the stove on medium heat takes forever, and with just 1 teaspoon of alcohol and 3 minutes of time is all that is required to make a cup of coffee in this fashion.
    I don't know that I'll ever take this setup on a hiking trip... I'm okay with instant - but I wanted to post this here for you guys who have a more discerning palate.

  16. #396

  17. #397

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    For you coffee lovers


    Some say it has multiple uses





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVx2PgHJhN8
    Last edited by zelph; 08-22-2018 at 20:30.

  18. #398
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    Someone mentioned about making instant coffee with cold water in the morning so they can get moving quicker. I tried mixing up a Starbucks Via this afternoon using cold tapwater. I'm pleased to say that I actually enjoyed it. I did not have high hopes, but it surprised me.

  19. #399
    Registered User MikekiM's Avatar
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    I'm a G7 Viet coffee drinker... Smells like crap when it's being made, but tastes about right once done.
    100 packets for $19 on Amazon.
    _______________________________________
    The difficulty of finding any given trail marker is directly proportional to the importance of the consequences of failing to find it.

  20. #400
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    Quote Originally Posted by Another Kevin View Post
    . . . The GSI isn't supposed to need paper filters, but without them it drips too fast and brews weak.
    I love strong coffee and use this GSI filter without a paper filter and without a problem. The secret is to manage the flow rate by how you pour in the water. I poor in enough water to wet the grounds. Then, enough water to wet the grounds again. And then poor water through more liberally. Thus, you control the brew time by how you pour. Works great. Surprisingly, it doesn't really take all that much time or fussing.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

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