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  1. #1

    Default Tarp tent or regular tent for a thru hike?

    I'm planning my first thru-hike (NOBO) for the following season and I'm having trouble deciding what would be best for all conditions. I was all set on going the tarp route, but then considered how the openings would let in no-see-ums, and it was suddenly conflicting. Then the obvious issue with tents is added weight (I'm gonna have trekking poles anyway, so why not use them with a tarp). I don't want to spend a ton, no more than around $200 either way and was hoping to receive some gracious input. Thank you, and happy trails!

  2. #2
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    An 8x10 silnylon tarp with a separate bug net works for me. I like the airiness. Several cottage companies make nice light tents as well. Total weights would be similar.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    TarpTent Pro Trail. 26 ounces. $210. Done.

    Wayne


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  4. #4

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    Use the search button my friend.

    There are so many options.

    However the easiest was mentioned above, Tarptent Protrail.

    Many good companies make excellent rectangular tarps. Etowah Gear makes nice rectangular tarps.

    Or is you have access to a sewing machine, you can make a real nice sil nylon tarp for about $60 worth of materials.

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    Registered User Moosling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    TarpTent Pro Trail. 26 ounces. $210. Done.

    Wayne


    Sent from somewhere around here.
    This would be my choice for a thru hike


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    I've now grown out of my Tarptent phase. No more saggy, fussy silnylon for me. Went back to a conventional good quality double-wall, freestanding solo tent. It will be your home for many months. Splurge and carry a nice one. I happen to use an MSR Hubba NX-1 now. Only about a pound more than my previous Tarptent Notch, but way more durable IMHO.

  7. #7
    Garlic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    TarpTent Pro Trail. 26 ounces. $210. Done.
    Me too. Search over. Lots of Tarptent products out there on the long trails.

    You will never find the perfect tent for all conditions. If there were such a thing, there would only be one tent.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

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    I like the idea of a tent with a floor and zippering up capabilities . My main 2 qualms at night are : Bugs and the Timber Rattle Snakes . These tents have always been a security for me in that respect .


    Gonzo

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    Quote Originally Posted by daddytwosticks View Post
    I've now grown out of my Tarptent phase. No more saggy, fussy silnylon for me. Went back to a conventional good quality double-wall, freestanding solo tent. It will be your home for many months. Splurge and carry a nice one. I happen to use an MSR Hubba NX-1 now. Only about a pound more than my previous Tarptent Notch, but way more durable IMHO.
    Same here, except that my double-wall tent is not freestanding. That's a good thing for me, as it motivates me to actually stake it out enough for moderate weather conditions that may arise in the night. I don't want to admit the weight though, so I am likely to take the ultralight single-wall on my thru. The increased comfort and security of the heavier tent is undeniable though. I am actually contemplating getting another double-wall tent by the same brand that isn't quite as luxurious but will shave off a few pounds...just not sure I can justify buying yet another tent, lol.

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