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  1. #21
    Registered User
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    03-20-2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Options View Post
    Hey guys. I'm a Type 1 , T1D (The D) and currently thru-hiking. I'm currently using an Animas Vibe pump and Dexcom G4 CGM. I store my insulin in a Frio and sleep with it if the temps drop close to or beneath freezing. I carry a thirty day supply of everything and have pens for a backup. The entire kit including batteries is just over 3 pounds. Lows that come on at night are treated with glucose tabs. I sleep with two small containers of them always within easy reach. In case you're wondering I'm hiking solo and having a blast. I'll be in Erwin, TN tomorrow so that's just over 350 miles counting the approach trail. The D has caused no problems to date. I do monitor closely as everyone should. You can check out my hike progress at trailjournals.com. My trail name is Options. I'll be happy to answer any question concerning my management plan. PM me if you'd like. Happy trails.

    We talked before about resupply. What are you doing to get pump supplies and pens, etc?
    76 HawkMtn w/Rangers
    13 HF>CramptonsG
    14 LHHT
    15 Girard/Quebec/LostTurkey/Saylor/Tuscarora/BlackForest
    16 Kennerdell/Cranberry-Otter/DollyS/WRim-NCT
    17 BearR
    18-19 AT NOBO 1540.5

  2. #22
    Registered User Options's Avatar
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    02-27-2011
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    Lenoir, NC
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    61
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    As for resupply, I setup up supply boxes that my SO mails out when I notify her of my location and scheduled arrival at a town, hostel or inn. The contents include only supplies that are needed for management of the D. Since I've only been on the trail 5 weeks only one resupply has been needed and it went off without a hitch. I also carry backup scripts, have my home pharmacy on speed dial as well as contact info for my endo.

  3. #23
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    01-22-2013
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    Fayetteville, NC
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    That's great! Good luck on your journey and I'll try to monitor your progress. These examples are an inspiration to myself and my son that he can still do things he wants with Type One! FYI he loves his Dexcom. And his omnipod much better than a traditional pump. Only problem is having to change the Omnipod every three days.

  4. #24
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    11-01-2014
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    Norwell, MA
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    57
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    It may be hard to imagine doing, but, going back to multiple daily injections (a pump holiday as it were) may be a simple and good option under some circumstances where the pump doesn't work well such as in prolonged hot weather or swimming where sets don't stay put or insulin doesn't stay cool enough in the reservoir. When we were on the Omnipod, we had endless problems with the sets because my son was constantly knocking the pods loose or getting bleeding with his activities. Sometimes it's a challenge finding enough set locations that don't interfere with backpacking suspensions and straps. In the end, for us, the pump and CGM does work best (and work well) most of the time.

    One summer we were on a canoe trip when my son's pump flooded and died. Oops! Luckily, we had the basics and just switched over to Lantus and multiple daily injections for the remaining few days until we got back to civilization and got a new pump. The broken pump turned out being non-issue. We actually held off on getting a new pump for a while while we debated the best upgrade options.

    In the end, I like to think of T1 as a pain in the butt, extra logistical headaches, and occasionally having to back away from short term goals because of waiting out lows or highs, but NEVER an insurmountable obstacle that limits what you and/or your kid can do. . . aside from join the military.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  5. #25

    Default A new option for diabetics

    There is an option for diabetics that I think is amazing and could stop the need for medications or greatly reduce them. It is called a Ketogenic diet and there is a ton of medical research to back it up. It has been used a long time to control epilepsy in children but later showed benefits for many others including myself.

    I am completely medication free and was bedridden for years before starting it and now I am preparing for the AT.

    Look it up on Wikipedia, Youtube and also DR Peter Attia who has some videos and a website. For those using this diet for diabetes or major illness, it is likely different than those just doing it for weight loss and general health. The difference would be that Carb intake must be less than 15 gr permanently.

    You will not feel hungry very often do to little to no glucose peaks and lows, inflammation is at the lowest it can possibly be which helps the body heal and repair itself faster than you have ever felt, energy levels both mental and physical are indescribable.

    Many famous athletes including Lebron James love the mental and physical energy as well as healing so much that they are doing this without having a serious illness.
    It can be done in different ways according to your lifestyle some people opt for some processed items and others do Paleo versions.

    There are many Dr's now jumping on board when it comes to milder versions of this diet basically Very low carb.

    These are good youtube channels to find out a lot of info

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_evJd_iZZzs ( General introduction by a Dr)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJtEO_U-JZQ ( Dr OZ)

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC03...m0wTJpDsu-9u4g ( Ketogenic health coach and Athlete)

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