Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 42
  1. #21
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,127
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    If the idea is to get insights into the experience of people in the past, one might strive to be authentically laden and equipped, as well as dressed.
    Of course, that is seemingly his plan. My point was that you made the point "You are free to carry non working replica firearms...." and I simply stated that there is nothing illegal about him carrying WORKING firearms, as far as I know.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    I think its cool.

    However I imagine you will omit the firearms, cast iron cooking implements, cook fires, bushcraft style camps, and diet of bacon grease, flour, and whatever small game you happen across? You are free to carry non working replica firearms.

    If only there were grizzlies and savages around...

    My parter in crime has considered carrying one of his period fire arms but I think we have come to the conclusion to omit this... not because we can't but because we want everyone on the trail to be comfortable. We don't want to run the risk of upsetting another hiker or group of hikers. Just not worth the trade off. My research on early western material culture.... exceeds more than just the clothing. Every piece of period gear we are taking is not only 100% appropriate for the era but the place specifically. Looking at import records as well as store sales records and wagon train information I have been able to narrow down, types fabrics, boots/shoes, leather, every little detail of what would have been available in the Colorado territory within our decided time frame. I think we will be right on the mark with authenticity for the period and place!

  3. #23

    Default

    what about food? Will you eat and carry "period food?" Gotta love hard tack!
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    what about food? Will you eat and carry "period food?" Gotta love hard tack!
    We have decided to do a mix.... I did a study not to long ago for the CHS and was able to compile a pretty solid list of foods readily available within the territory the first 5 years ( 59-63 ). Blocked dry soups, dried meats, fruits and vegetables, hard and soft breads, oysters, the list goes on and on. We have compiled a pretty decent list of period foods that will be mixed with high calorie modern add ins. First and foremost we want to be safe, thats key number one, so having things like a proper amount of food as well as a water filter, modern maps and guidebooks is paramount.

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-29-2008
    Location
    REHOBOTH BEACH, DE
    Age
    68
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    Thank goodness for honey. No Snickers for you guys.

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TD55 View Post
    Thank goodness for honey. No Snickers for you guys.
    Right : )

    Ben

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    958

    Default

    Wonder what the "ultralight hiker "of that era carried weight wise? Cast iron fry pan? Wood fire cooking? Tarp shelter .

  8. #28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheyou View Post
    Wonder what the "ultralight hiker "of that era carried weight wise? Cast iron fry pan? Wood fire cooking? Tarp shelter .
    I'm guessing most if not all of them used pack animals

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
    I'm guessing most if not all of them used pack animals
    Right on the money with this one.... What a lot of folks have to remember about this early era is "backpacking" Was not really a thing. Mountaineering had not really caught on in america. The French, and those spread out through the Middle East were already toying with climbing and hiking for fun but with the westward expansion in the US most folks were only walking long distances because they had to. The similarities between those who actually "hiked" For fun and that of the modern ultralight backpacker are shockingly similar, techniques and tools were in essence the same just minus the fancy modern synthetic cloths. So just as a simple breakdown here is my current setup.

    Pack - Box Frame Knapsack - Roughly
    Wool Blanket
    Shelter half - wax & water treated cotton drill. (partner is carrying the other half )
    India Rubber Ground Sheet / Poncho
    4x4 Hot dipped tin cup
    1 L tin ribbed canteen W/ leather strap
    Small stamped steel frying pan
    Hot dipped tin stamped steel plate
    Eating utensils ( Spoon & Fork )
    Tin Lantern
    Extra Candles
    Matches

    Canvas (wax and mink oil treated ) Sporting Shoes ( ill send several pair along the way to swap out )
    Knit wool drawers
    Knit undershirt
    Pleated linen shirt
    Jean Wool ( cotton wool blend ) trousers
    Wool socks ( will carry several pair to rotate )
    silk padded waistcoat
    Unlined wool DB frock
    Fur Felt wide brimmed hat
    Waist belt
    India Rubber Rain Coat

    Im sure I'm missing some stuff this is just off the top of my head. With the list above you'd be shocked as to how much is multi use just as modern gear is. You'd also be shocked to learn how light some of the stuff actually is. With the tin items all if it is hot dipped steel. Meaning its very thin pliable steel thats then dipped in molten tin which hardens the steel yet keeps it fairly rust resistant and lightweight. The box frame pack weighs in at only 37 oz. The india rubber goods are a bit heavy but incredibly insulating and entirely water proof. Once i square things out a bit more ill make a more detailed list with weights and such.

    We also considered bringing a pack animal but did not have the money or means to do so properly.

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Although this is not the pack ill be carrying for this trip.... its a cool example of one of the first packs designed within the US for the original purpose of hiking. Its an 1857 patent pack known as the "baxter" pack. IT was later redesigned for the federal war effort in 1863. Eerily similar to a lot of the aluminum frame packs of the 1970s.

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    This is another great example of a civilian used 1850s/60s pack. Its considered a single bag style. Both of the last packs are packs i made based off original images, descriptions and catalog images.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    This is one of the best images/paintings I've been able to come across showing a true "Hiker" painted in 1858. That pack is a box frame pack is similar to what ill be using.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    ^ as to the above.... the shoe image is that of the "Canvas Sporting Shoe" Ill be wearing. it gained popularity in the mid 1850s and the style stuck around late in the the 1920s.

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    958

    Default

    Soldiers must have bin like backpackers

  15. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-29-2012
    Location
    Moorhead,Minnesota
    Age
    51
    Posts
    238

    Default

    The shoes don't look like much fun to hike in to me...

  16. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by archie View Post
    The shoes don't look like much fun to hike in to me...

    They are surprisingly comfortable.... They equate to a modern converse shoe. A bit of a hard step with the leather soles but mold to feet nicely. Also with the treated canvas body they breath quite well while still repelling water.

  17. #37
    Registered User Water Rat's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-17-2012
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    2,443
    Images
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BensMusicHiker View Post
    They are surprisingly comfortable.... They equate to a modern converse shoe. A bit of a hard step with the leather soles but mold to feet nicely. Also with the treated canvas body they breath quite well while still repelling water.
    I look forward to following your trip - It sounds like it will definitely be an unforgettable journey!

    Very curious about the shoes and I figured you would be the best person to ask. Have you come across any information as to how long/how many miles the shoes might last? Do the toes pinch, or do you need to wear a size larger than you normally wear?

    I wish you all the best with your travels!

  18. #38
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-29-2012
    Location
    Erie, Colorado
    Age
    30
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Water Rat View Post
    I look forward to following your trip - It sounds like it will definitely be an unforgettable journey!

    Very curious about the shoes and I figured you would be the best person to ask. Have you come across any information as to how long/how many miles the shoes might last? Do the toes pinch, or do you need to wear a size larger than you normally wear?

    I wish you all the best with your travels!
    This particular style shoe is not double soled or "half soled" So they will need to be replaced along the trip. I manufacture these shoes so have access to an unlimited amount. So I am currently debating on how often I should replace them since I can pretty much replace them as much as Id like. That being said every 150-200 miles would be their max. As for the fit... they fit much like modern tennis shoes... Think Converse ( funny because they kind of look like them in a way. ) If I go half a size up on these shoes they ride and fit perfectly.

  19. #39

    Default

    It doesn't matter who makes your shoes, get them oversized or you will have foot problems.

  20. #40
    Clueless Weekender
    Join Date
    04-10-2011
    Location
    Niskayuna, New York
    Age
    63
    Posts
    3,863
    Journal Entries
    10

    Default

    That's so cool!

    Modern hikers don't realize that there were explorers and travelers even in that period who traveled lightweight even by today's standards. If you look at the gear lists in some of George Washington "Nessmuk" Sears's letters, or read his Woodcraft and Camping, you'll realize that even in 1880 (twenty years after the time you're targeting, but I suspect that a similar kit can be put together from 1860 gear), there were people who could do a solo wilderness trek with a pack that Sears says never exceeded 26 pounds.

    Sears was an ultralighter before ultralight was a thing. His canoe, the Sairy Gamp, weighs a mere 10.5 pounds. (Of course, he was a very small man. A similar boat scaled to carry me safely would be over twice that weight!) Incidentally, it was he that pioneered the use of a double-blade kayak paddle and a sitting, rather than kneeling position in a canoe. The man liked his comfort on the water, while making his way through the beaver swamps of the Adirondacks with paddle, pole and portage.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •