WhiteBlaze Pages 2022
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$5 for printable PDF, AVAILABLE NOW. $9 for interactive PDF(smartphone version)
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2016
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Age
    52
    Posts
    14
    Journal Entries
    3

    Default ULA CDT fit question

    I've got a question for ULA CDT owners. I just received a CDT in medium, and I'm concerned about the fit. This is my first large frameless pack (and my first ultralight pack, having used a 5lb Dana Design previously.) My immediate impression was that it is too small and that I need a large despite the manufacturer's torso sizing recommendations (my torso is 19-20".)

    How is this fit? Far more weight on the shoulders than I would expect...

    Thanks in advance...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2016
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Age
    52
    Posts
    14
    Journal Entries
    3

    Default

    I guess I should have noted that the belt is cinched over my iliac crest.

    I'm 5'8 145lbs, if that's helpful additional info.

  3. #3
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-18-2005
    Location
    Cheyenne, WY
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,438

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shawnb View Post
    I guess I should have noted that the belt is cinched over my iliac crest.

    I'm 5'8 145lbs, if that's helpful additional info.
    It is sitting too low. ULA website has good info on sizing and fitting their packs.
    Lonehiker (MRT '22)

  4. #4

    Default

    Looks about right torso length to me. What kind of frame were you using in that pic? It looks like the pack may be hanging a bit off your shoulders because the lack of adequate suspension and possibly the pack not being full and/or the waist belt not being tight enough(it looks to be slightly angling down rather than even more horizontal?) The CDT does not have load lifters. It was not designed for loads of more than about 25-28 lbs for long periods. As a consequence it can fit(hang of the shoulders) a bit different than a conventional pack with a stiff internal built in suspension. When I'm near my max wt load I put the CDT on shrugging my shoulders upwards first, hold the wt there and adjust the shoulder straps tighter but not in their final position so they still have some play. Then tighten the waist belt, shoulders still shrugged upwards. If you have the suspension right(stiff enough for the load) and the adjusting correct load should be on your hips when you loosen your shoulders to a relaxed state. I THEN make final adjustments to the shoulder harness bringing the pack slightly inward closer to my back. That's how I do it. The feel is still a bit different than say even a framed ZP Arc Blast with load lifters or a conventional well fitting well adjusted pack!

    I hear ya. When I first went to this type of rucksack from the more conventional stiff internal framesheet of the Granite Gear Vapor trail it felt weird. I felt like the load was hanging too much on my shoulders. Getting the virtual suspension right and packing the load differently helped me adjust. If you play with these things I think you'll get used to it too getting a better adjusted fit.

    I once used the older Thermarest ProLite Shorti, now renamed, folded in threes or fours as my virtual suspension. I now use the NeoAir XLite Shortie. I strip down all the removable items on my CDT. The foam backrest alone will not be adequate with anything but the lightest load. I almost fully deflate the pad, place inside with top elastic straps holding it in place with the pad air nozzle up and facing into the pack volume not towards my back. Then the load is almost fully packed. I do be mindful of not placing sharp(shepard hooks) or bulky objects(cook pot) next to the pad. Near the top before I place a rain jacket, WP apparel, or final gear I reach in and puff a few more breathes into the pad. Close the air valve. This anchors the load by filling in any space. It stiffens the pack. It also keeps from unduly inflating the pad taking up too much of the interior's main body volume. That's my frame that I'm well able to handle 25 lb loads with all/almost all of it on my hips. If my frame or pack folds easily or doesn't stay stiff when I have it off sitting upright on the ground with pretty much a full load suspension isn't right for the maxed out load wt. When I have my suspension(pad) and load right there is usually a little vertical arc to where it lays next to my pack. The arc is not like an Arc Blast It's in the vertical direction the entire length next to my back all the way down to where the hipbelt starts. I find this to be more important in hot weather so less of the Dyneema or Robic is up against my back. It's less sweaty.

  5. #5
    Registered User lonehiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-18-2005
    Location
    Cheyenne, WY
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,438

    Default

    The shoulder straps should only curve around the shoulders an inch or two.
    Lonehiker (MRT '22)

  6. #6

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,866
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Pack looks way too low.

    Too have structure a frameless pack needs to be packed full and rigid, using sleeping pad usually for support. Or else its just a sack. Being a sack is OK at 10 lbs, not 25.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 04-16-2016 at 22:14.

  7. #7
    AT 2012
    Join Date
    09-11-2006
    Location
    Wallingford, CT
    Age
    71
    Posts
    1,747

    Default

    Is this a recent mass drop delivery? Mine just arrived too. Good luck with your New pack.
    Lazarus

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    I use a CDT on week long hikes . 18 lbs is great 20 is pushing the limits for me.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2016
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Age
    52
    Posts
    14
    Journal Entries
    3

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the input. I've also been talking with Chris McMaster (excellent product support thus far with this company) and he says I need a large. Several (including Chris) have said I wear it low - I don't know - if I wore it any higher the belt would be not be load bearing at all. The picture I posted is only with the included pad - I was planning on getting the Gossamer Gear Nightlight for "frame" support. I did an experiment with (an obviously overkill) Thermarest full-length basecamp just to see how the pack is different with a lot of structure and the fit was not much different.

    I may well upgrade to an Ohm 2.0 at this point.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    CDT load bearing on hips that's funny.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2016
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Age
    52
    Posts
    14
    Journal Entries
    3

    Default

    Yeah I don't know. Perhaps I've been spoiled having a pack with a great suspension for a long time. My idea of UL comfort is not carrying 18lbs on my shoulders.

  12. #12

    Default

    That foam sheet the CDT comes with does not constitute a suspension. If using that by itself the pack will sag similar as seen in your pic. Wt will not be transferred mainly to the hips. The wt will pull mainly on the shoulders. You are desiring a more rigid virtual suspension. I see the stock foam pad mainly padding for against the back only needed if you want to haphazardly pack your load or don't like a possible temp difference of water against your back if using the removable hydration sleeve storing water inside the pack. Exactly what I see in your pic I've dealt with before my lack of understanding how to create an adequate load hip bearing virtual suspension. IMO, the OHM, may have been a direct ULA design attempt at offering a backpack with a suspension because of, no offense intended, user's lack of familiarity with the CDT rucksack design. Hence, we see offered the Ohm with a carbon fiber/delrin active suspension hoop. In short, if you don't want to learn how to create a suspension in a frameless pack or consider how to pack a frameless pack this pack may not be right for you. This is after all an UL pack. Umm, Ultra Light Adventures is what ULA stands for.

    FWIW I prefer, especially with the ULA CDT, the hip belt riding high on my hips. With a conventional fully framed backpack I don't perhaps mind the hip belt riding just a bit lower.

    Again, if you try doing what I suggested, before you relax those shoulders downward, AND after firmly adjusting down the hip belt buckle to have the hip belt firmly riding on your hips, then relax the shoulders, a properly adjusted and framed CDT should hold on your hips with the wt on the hips with the pack still having good rigidity. Then, make final shoulder harness adjustments pulling the pack closer to your upper back. The pack should not be pulling away unduly from your upper back.

    FWIW, my info comes from contact with Brian Frankle, the founder of ULA and designer of the CDT when it was called the Conduit, and through my own experiences. The Conduit(CDT)'s design arose out of what Brian wanted in an UL backpack. He used the Conduit/CDT extensively. I liked what he came up with and likewise adopted the pack for my UL uses on many of the same hikes Brian accomplished using the Conduit/CDT. FWIW, I just bought my 8th ULA CDT/Conduit hiking everyone into the ground, FWIW, more than anyone else I know as a LD hiker who currently employs the pack. The ULA CDT has been my goto hands on choice LD backpack since 2007-08 averaging, as a good guesstimate, 2500+ hiking/trail miles on it per yr. I use the CDT as my travel luggage, traveling pack(non hiking) as well. In short, 10,000's of trail miles and who knows how many train, airport, bus etc miles, on my ULA Conduits/CDTs.

    Always better to check things out in person so certainly missing things coming to an incorrect or incomplete conclusion is possible but that's my initial assessment based on what's been shared by you. Even with a longer torso length, which I don't think is your problem (based on the accuracy of the info shared), although that might help some with the comfort factor, the pack would still be sagging on you with too much wt/pull on the shoulders if relying solely on the stock foam sheet as your suspension and adjusting/wearing it as you are in your pic. The pack is pulling away from your upper back too much. I hope this helps.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2016
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Age
    52
    Posts
    14
    Journal Entries
    3

    Default

    I appreciate it Dogwood, I really do. No offense taken regarding unfamiliarity with properly packing this style of pack. I took your fitting suggestion, and I had another picture taken with the aforementioned oversize thermarest in it plus various bits for weight. What do you think of this? It is far more comfortable, rides much higher on the hips than I'm used to (although still carries much of the load on the hips), and still feels a bit strange... but enough to make me second guess myself on sizing.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    CDT - 2013, PCT - 2009, AT - 1300 miles done burger's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-03-2005
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,437

    Default

    That picture looks better. The next question is: is there a lot of weight on your shoulders? Most all of it should be on your hips. Also, are you wearing using the sternum strap? I always do with the CDT--it seems to keep the pack closer to my back, and thereby higher on my shoulders.

    The main question, though, is: is the pack comfortable? If it feels strange walking around the house, imagine how it's going to feel after 10 or 20 miles...

  15. #15

    Default

    Better. How does the hip belt feel? Not riding obsessively high? The med length torso should work if you're a 19-20" length torso. The 20 oz CDT rucksack is a vastly different feel than a 80 oz conventional Dana. Gonna be very strange feeling like the CDT is floating on your back! Try out a short hike playing with the virtual frame keeping the load under 20lbs and the pack pretty full. Play with the adjusting.

    As you stated ULA has great Customer Service. They'll work with you. Have you sent Chris these pics? I'd like to know what he says.

    I'm with Burger on his sternum strap comment which I feel is perhaps even more important with the J shoulder harness as it looks you have or with less broad square shoulders.

    For entry into the frameless pack category at this volume, with the CDT's features, with it's durability, at a 20 oz wt(removable items removed), at its price pt there's a lot to like about the CDT IF it works within your hikes. Of course, I'm biased though.

  16. #16

    Default

    Have you tried out the front hand resting loops or carrying water bottles on the shoulder straps? This too helps balance out the load and usually results in a closer to the back position more centered feeling of gravity. Employing either of these takes some stress off needing an optimal virtual frame(could be beneficial as you adjust to a new frameless pack) but does bring more wt to the shoulders NOT all that critical if you're staying with the design parameters and not loading heavily to the rear of the pack.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2016
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Age
    52
    Posts
    14
    Journal Entries
    3

    Default

    I sent my CDT back today to exchange for a large. Thanks everybody for the help.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    That's what I would do

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-30-2012
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Age
    61
    Posts
    883
    Images
    8

    Default

    I am pretty dense, but it seems like if a pack is hanging too low, the torso is too long, not too short...but like I said, I am spatially challenged!

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Namtrag View Post
    I am pretty dense, but it seems like if a pack is hanging too low, the torso is too long, not too short...but like I said, I am spatially challenged!

    Yes you r ha ha

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •