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  1. #61

    Default No freezer bag, no dish washing, I boil

    My eating gear consists of my pot/bowl and a spoon. I scrape my pot/bowl as clean as possible and lick my spoon clean.

    The next time I use my pot/bowl it will be full of boiling water which I will stir with my spoon.

    To my way of thinking, boiling water is safer than dish washing. For me this system is the easiest and most environmentally friendly method of cooking. No gray water, no used plastic bags.

  2. #62
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    I tried freezer bag cooking, but cleaning the bag was worse than cleaning the pot. I can reuse my bags for storing food, if I dont cook in them. Cleaning my pot is a very minor inconvenience compared to throwing away soiled freezer bags after use.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post

    Another way I reduce trash on trail and gain better overall energy, health and nutrition is by growing my own sprouts as I hike. It's simple. http://outdoorherbivore.com/trail-sprouts/
    I'm kinda fascinated by this, what a cool idea!

    can you give more details? maybe another thread?..

  4. #64
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Secondmouse View Post
    I'm kinda fascinated by this, what a cool idea!

    can you give more details? maybe another thread?..
    Back in the Stone Age, before the Internet, we grew our own sprouts at home. I'm sure the Internet is chock full of information on sprout growing.
    Wayne


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  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    I tried freezer bag cooking, but cleaning the bag was worse than cleaning the pot. I can reuse my bags for storing food, if I dont cook in them. Cleaning my pot is a very minor inconvenience compared to throwing away soiled freezer bags after use.
    +1.

    Moi mÍme.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Back in the Stone Age, before the Internet, we grew our own sprouts at home. I'm sure the Internet is chock full of information on sprout growing.
    Wayne


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    I was asking Dogwood...

  7. #67
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    I tried freezer bag cooking, but cleaning the bag was worse than cleaning the pot. I can reuse my bags for storing food, if I dont cook in them. Cleaning my pot is a very minor inconvenience compared to throwing away soiled freezer bags after use.
    +1

    In town you can resupply your favorite staples (oats, rice, noodles, ...) and reuse the same bags for the same purpose. (Just make sure you never put dirty hands inside those bags!) If you can buy in bulk that's great; if not, you can often find places to recycle. Peel the plastic off your Quaker Oats cylinder and the rest goes into the mixed paper bin. I always look for the small box of Idahoan potato flakes (cardboard is recyclable) and split the contents into multiple bags; I avoid the foil pouches. I can also add powdered Nido Fortificada, parsley flakes, and whatever else I want to make the potatoes suit my taste. If you can save weight using freezer bags for food storage (rather than for cooking) I don't see any reason why you wouldn't want to. Most food packaging stays in town; the containers that go on my back are mainly reusable zipper bags. Lots of times on previous hikes when I dumped my trash bag it only had used dental floss and Ramen wrappers (lighter than freezer bags) in it. (I must admit these days I accumulate more trash, including powdered cheese packets now I'm past being sick of mac & cheese. Also wet loose tea since I discovered Lipton Yellow Label.)

    I disagree with the claim that you don't need soap for cleaning your cooking gear. If you're adding butterfat/olive oil to maintain your calorie intake, you really do want to use soap to remove the grease. The only thing that smells worse than a through-hiker is the through-hiker's rancid cook pot. Once a day you might time things to dump your soapy water into your cathole before filling it in; soaking the TP helps it start decomposing.

  8. #68
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    I'm not reading 4 pages to find out if anyone else agrees with me.
    I wasted good money finding out that I can't stomach Knorr and Bear Creek products and FBC.
    I learned how to wash and sterilize dishes and utensils ages ago.
    I wonder if there is a correlation between norovirus (sp?) and FBC? It's plausible.
    Wayne


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  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    I wonder if there is a correlation between norovirus (sp?) and FBC? It's plausible.
    Open bag add hot/boiling water, wait, eat, put empty FB bag in your trash bag, done.

    I really don't see how FBC could contribute to getting or spreading Norovirus, more than pot cooking.

    I could see pot cooking contributing to the spread, if the pot's wash water was not disposed of correctly.

    What am i missing?


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  10. #70

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    I started cooking in my pot again last summer. I didn't like the way pasta/rice cooked in a freezer bag and I realized using a little extra fuel to simmer a few more minutes was not the end of the world. Pasta and rice cooked better and I started to actually attempt cooking again. How I clean depends on location and what I am cooking but I make sure to keep things in compliance with LNT or minimizing impact. I have done the cathole dirty water technique and I have discarded dirty water in an active fire ring. It really depends on the situation. I rarely use soap when cleaning my pot. Usually after my dinner I boil some more water to make hot tea so I'm getting some sanitizing that way.

    With regards to brushing teeth, I am not sure if it's been updated but I was taught in Scouts 30 years ago when spitting out toothpaste, you want to spray it as wide as possible. The term used was "atomizing" your spit. I still do that to this day.

  11. #71
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by V Eight View Post
    I really don't see how FBC could contribute to getting or spreading Norovirus, more than pot cooking.
    ...
    What am i missing?
    I think the problem is from dirty hands scraping the insides of the freezer bag, then the contamination being consumed in subsequent spoonfuls. A cooking pot has rigid sides that won't collapse on the eater's hands, plus it isn't nearly as tall as a bag so you don't have to reach in as far. Tired, hungry hikers tend to focus more on food than on hygiene, and bags are inherently messier to eat from than rigid containers.

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by DownEaster View Post
    I think the problem is from dirty hands scraping the insides of the freezer bag, then the contamination being consumed in subsequent spoonfuls. A cooking pot has rigid sides that won't collapse on the eater's hands, plus it isn't nearly as tall as a bag so you don't have to reach in as far. Tired, hungry hikers tend to focus more on food than on hygiene, and bags are inherently messier to eat from than rigid containers.
    Gotta disagree with this.

    A quart size ziploc fits perfectly in a plastic caldera cone screw canister (as sold at Traildesigns.com) making it a lined pot. Any long handled spoon reaches to the bottom with dirtying hands.

    When done, just pull out the bag and discard. No cleanup.

  13. #73

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    If soap has phosphates, it will definitely kill bacteria that break down what is in privies.

    The other problem of soap used while backpacking is having sufficient rinse water 200' from the water source. The residual "soap" can give you diarrhea.

    If you must, use a biodegradable soap like CampSuds.

    I prefer to have a little extea boiled water than I need for fb cooking and a hot drink, if the pan size allows.

    I usually simply scrape out the residual food with a GSI mini scraper, or Snow Peak combination Scraper and Spork, or GSI long handle scraper, wipe with a net bag cut from a garlic net bag, then rinse with that left over hot water.

    No matter what my cooking gear, I have a scraper in my cook kit.

    Others like the cut scrap of a net bag for garlic, however I would rather use the scraper as an eating utensil rather than rinse food bits off the scrap of a net bag for garlic. I do not like leaving the food scrapings on the ground.

  14. #74

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    The quart size ziploc fits perfectly inside my JetBoil Zip, after cooled down while it has been cooking inside a cozy.

    It will work just fine with any 3 3/4" or 10 cm diameter opening cookpot.

  15. #75
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    PackIt Gourmet meals are made to be steeped in their own bag.

  16. #76
    Registered User ShelterLeopard's Avatar
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    I just cook everything in my pot, and I don't use soap to clean until I get to a town for a resupply. In winter I scrub it with snow, all other times I just use water and a bandana (pine needles also work well). Next time you boil water in your pot, it'll get nice and sanitized.
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